Judson University Course Catalog
Index
1. Architecture, Art&Design 2. Business
3. Division of Education 4. Liberal Arts
5. Honors 6. Study Abroad Program


Architecture, Art&Design Undergraduate 2017-2018
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
ARC101
Shop Stewardship Materials and Processes
Introduction to a wide range of materials and their manipulation with hand and power tools, cutting, assembly and finishing in a model shop setting. Introduction to architectural models and flat work.
Architecture students should try to take this class in the Fall. Art & Design students should enroll for Spring if at all possible. Interior Design, either semester is fine.
Art/Design Fee: $50.00.
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ARC122
Communication and Architectonics
Graphic and spatial communications through a series of short, 2D and 3D composition explorations; developing the conventions of diagram, plan, section, elevation and model.
Arch Supply Fee: $650.00.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
ARC222
Construction Tectonics and Assemblies
Introduction to the role of architect, building, and zoning codes, and building systems with an emphasis on wood light frame construction and assemblies typical of residential buildings. Systems and assemblies studied include wall, roof and foundation enclosure, structural, HVAC, and electrical. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC231
History of Architecture I
The establishment of building traditions throughout the globe, emphasizing the means by which attitudes about environment, ecology, religion, government and leisure contribute to decisions about place, context, materials and methods of structural and ornamental design, Focus on the canon and customs from the ancient Mediterranean to medieval Europe, with additional studies on the Fertile, Crescent, India, Japan and China, and Muslim empires. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC232
History of Architecture II
Developments within, and in, response to, building traditions that emphasize the response of architects to changes in intellectual culture, religious belief and practice, technology and social structures beginning in the fifteenth century. Focus on the transformation of architectural literacy and professionalism among practitioners in Europe, its colonies, and the US.
Pre-requisites: ARC231
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC251
Heuristics and Architectonics
Introduction to concept generators and heuristic design process through architectonic explorations.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: ARC122
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
ARC252
Architectural Design Explorations
Explorations of architectural strategies in space, place, site, massing and tectonics including an introduction to digital modeling and fabrication.
Laptop computer per department specifications.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: ARC251
Every Spring and Summer Hours: 4.00
ARC310
Digital Design Simulation
Develops critical approaches to theories of digital design, fabrication, simulation and information modeling emphasizing the changing role of integrated design and analysis.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Art/Arch Supply Fee: $125.00.
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC321
Theories of Environmental Stewardship
Introduction to the ecological and environmental systems issues of architectural design, Lectures and problems related to vernacular and environmental principles that impact architecture.
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
Pre-requisites: PHY237
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC322
Advanced Construction Tectonics and Assemblies
Continues the exploration of the role of the architect, building codes, and building systems with an emphasis on construction and assemblies typical of commercial buildings. Systems and assemblies studies include wall, roof, and structural. Material exploration and utilization includes concrete, steel, and glass curtain wall. Student project includes a scaled building enclosure model.
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
Pre-requisites: ARC222 OR ARC222X
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC331
History of Architecture after the Industrial Revolution
Topics in the history of architecture starting in the Industrial Revolution and through another period of significant technological development, the Digital Age. Investigates various responses by architects to technological change, including aesthetics, construction materials and methods, means of communication, and professionalization, in the midst of social, religious, economic and political contexts in the period starting ca. 1750.
Pre-requisites: ARC232X & ARC252X
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC332
Architecture of Cities
Topics in city- and landscape-making are investigated chronologically; long-standing cultural habits, political and religious representation, effects of the modern economy, American suburbanization, and Western intellectual history for the city. Major attention given to Western cities and landscapes, lesser to non-Western cities.
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
Pre-requisites: ARC232
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC341
Theories of Architectural Structures
An introductory course in statics and strength of materials for architects, with a specific focus on the conceptual relationships between structure and form. Structural concepts including static systems, tension/compression, bending and shear stress, combined stresses, strain, cross-sectional considerations, and the physical behavior of structural materials will be addressed abstractly.
Pre-requisites: PHY237
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
ARC351
Intermediate Architecture Design Studies
Intermediate design method and systems thinking in the context of phenomenological explorations of light, material and form. Students explore poetic optimism in the creative enterprise in problems related to the natural environment and the interface of humans with each other and all of creation.
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 5.00
ARC352
Elective Architecture Design Studies
Intermediate design method and systems thinking in an open-elective studio approach. This non-prescriptive studio allows alternative exploration of design subject at the discretion of the design studio critic.
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
NOTE: All students register for this section of ARC352, and studiooptions will be determined once the semester begins.
Pre-requisites: ARC351
Every Spring Semester Hours: 5.00
ARC381
Architectural Study Tour
Observe and analyze selected European urban sites and architecture using various methods and media. Visits to museums may be included. On-site design project may be featured.
NOTE: Open to any SOADA student accepted to third-year. This course has a supply fee of $100.00 and a trip/travel fee of $5,600.00. Please attend informational meetings for itinerary, required preparations and specific details.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
NOTE: Open to any SOADA student accepted to third year. This course has a supply fee of $5,600. Please attend informational meetingsfor itinerary, required preparations and specific details.
Every Summer Hours: 5.00
ARC410
Advanced Digital Design
Advanced exploration of theories of digital design informing all stages of architectural production. Facilitates exploration of analytical, parametric, environmental and material dimensions of digital design in architecture.
Intended for architecture majors of senior standing. May be taken as ARC610 for graduate credit.
Pre-requisites: ARC310
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC411
Adv Digital Representation II
This course extends the representational capabilities of the student through various means of web related media; as particularly related to the digital medias of modeling, graphic, and web systems. Students will explore communication and publication strategies through Internet and Intranet systems as they potentially relate to architectural practice. Students will visit offices in the region that utilize web resources in creative and critical ways, and become familiar with the different possibilities for digital architectural communication. Students will utilize Adobe Go-Live, Live Motion, Auto CAD 2000, Form-Z, Photoshop and Illustrator.
Architecture majors of senior standing with instructor's permission. May be taken as ARC611 for graduate credit.
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC416
Architectural Rendering in Watercolor
This course is intended to introduce the students to the history tools, and techniques of watercolor rendering as applied to architectural spaces. This is primarily a studio course, meaning that most of the time will be spent practicing rendering techniques, both in and out of class.
May be taken as ARC616 for graduate credit.
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC421
Environmental Technology II
Environmental systems that are part of architecture including acoustics, electric lighting and day lighting. Lectures and problems that integrate these systems in architecture.
Co-requisites: ARC451
Pre-requisites: ARC321
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC422
Environmental Technology III
A comprehensive overview of environmental systems that serve large buildings including HVAC, electrical transportation, communication and water systems.
Co-requisites: ARC452
Pre-requisites: ARC421
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC425
Adv Architectural Acoustics I
This course will consist of lectures, seminars, readings and field trips to large meetings rooms for speech and/or music, such as places of worship, theatres, concert halls, auditoriums. Students will work individually on the design of a class project, competition project or a actual building project by establishing acoustical design goals for different spaces in a building. The purpose of studying these themes of architectural acoustics is to learn how to make use of sonic and physical changes that enhance the quality of the built environment. Consequently, architectural acoustics studies and practice will include the tasks of providing comfort and environmental protection to support human activities, through architectural forms that are aesthetically pleasing in the community and society at large.
Intended for fourth year architecture or interior design majors and graduate students. May be taken as ARC625 for graduate credit.
Pre-requisites: ARC321 & ARC421 OR INT428
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC426
Daylighting in Architecture
The purpose of this course is to learn how to make use of visual and physical changes that enhance the quality of the built environment. The works of Aalto, Kahn, Mies, Wright, among others have controlled the sensory environmental qualities such as heat, light and sound to accentuate their design concepts. Architectural lighting studies and practice includes the task of providing comfort and environmental protection to support human activities, through architectural forms that are aesthetically pleasing in the community and society at large.
Co-requisites: ARC421 & INT428
Pre-requisites: ARC321
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC427
Architecture for Conviviality
Students consider the warnings that industrialized objects, including buildings, tend to cause our disengagement. We will consider how buildings may have potential for building community and for enhancing engagement with created reality. All of us will be challenged to consider our faith-practice in the world described by contemporary philosophers, theorists, Christians, and critics. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC429
Multiculturalism and Architecture
True Architecture transcends different cultures, civilizations and time. Architecture is practical in a global community and in a pluralistic society. In this course, students are challenged to be aware of the images, patterns, and aesthetics that impact this pluralistic society, and to design responsibly. Diverse non-western communities often approach built form in unique and meaningful ways that reflect their culture, environmental and historical origins. Unfortunately, these ways are not always understood and therefore not represented in the subsequent Architecture produced. This course is intended to encourage students to be aware and sensitive to the diverse issues and patterns that generate the imagery of these built forms and what the implication can be in creating responsive Architecture. This course is an architectural exploration of the ethnicity and the cultural significance of the uniqueness of three contemporary Global Communities and Civilizations. The three cultures investigated are: the African community: the Asian community; and the Native American Community
May be taken as ARC629 for graduate credit.
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC441
Adv Architectural Structures
Structural design and analysis of buildings, for architects, including steel, concrete, timber and long-span structures. Applications of concepts of tension/compression, bending and shear stress, combined stresses, structural connections, load resolution, member sizing and wind loading on multi-story buildings. Course content addresses traditional as well as current techniques, applications, materials and methods for designing structural solutions.
Pre-requisites: ARC341
Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
ARC442
Advanced Architectural Drawing
Using a series of studio exercises and sketchbooks, it will expose the student to the intersection of various types of drawing to develop a unique blend of controlled sketching with architectural sensibilities and conventions. The student will be introduced to the history tools and techniques of sketching as applied to architectural subjects. The use of black and white will be emphasized with limited exposure to color. The study of shades and shadow casting, or sciography, will also be covered in some detail.
May be taken as ARC642 for graduate credit.
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC451
Integrative Architectural Design Studies I
Advanced integrated architectural design thinking and making with particular considerations of light, structure, acoustics, and material in the shaping of educational and/or ecclesiastical environments that include assembly spaces.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: ARC352
Every Fall Semester Hours: 5.00
ARC452
Integrative Architectural Design Studies II
Advanced integrated architectural design thinking and making with particular considerations of building envelope, environmental systems, life safety, accessibility, conveyance, and sit in the shaping of public oriented building type.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Co-requisites: ARC422
Pre-requisites: ARC451
Every Spring Semester Hours: 5.00
ARC462
Preceptorship Preparation
The course prepares students for internship and preceptorship experiential learning as students complete the undergraduate program. Students explore histories of practice and professionalization, the topographies of contemporary practice, and strategies for professional development. Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
ARC492
Architecture for Christian Worship
Humanity has chosen to worship the Triune God communally through the design and use of particular built environments. This class is designed to provoke critical reflection on how these worship spaces for worship have helped to articulate and shape people's understanding and experience of God. We will examine many different architectural expressions of worship space through time with an eye toward discerning how church buildings of the past may provide insight for church designs in the present and future.
Prereq ARC352 or Graduate standing or permission of instructor Offered as ARC692 for graduate credit
Varies Hours: 3.00
ART111
Drawing I
An introduction to the techniques and media of black and white drawing, with special attention given to problems in gesture, shape, line/edge, value and one- and two-point perspective. Priority seating for Art, Design and Architecture majors.
Art/Design Fee: $150.00
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ART123
Introduction to Photography
Introduction to the art of photography. Includes the examination of the fundamental principles and techniques that govern photographic image making, camera operation, and applications for photography. This course will emphasize black and white digital photography. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ART211
Drawing II
Continuation of Drawing I with special attention given to problems in texture, advanced perspective, and color. Emphasis on objective drawing with convincing mass, space, proportion, structure, and surface. Student must demonstrate proficiency. Priority seating for Art, Design and Architecture majors.
Art/Design Fee: $225.00
Priority seating for Art, Design and Pre-Interior Design majors.
Pre-requisites: ART111
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART212
Painting I
Introduction to traditional and contemporary painting theory and practice. Includes study of surface preparation, paint application, and composition.
Instructor may override prereqs
Art/Design Fee: $400.00
Pre-requisites: ART111 & DES121
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ART217
Sculpture I
Beginning studies in additive, subtractive, and assemblage of visual discourse in three dimensions, utilizing traditional and non-traditional media.
Prereqs: ART111, DES121 & DES122 or permission of instructor.
Art and Design Fee: $200.00
Pre-requisites: ART111 & DES122
Hours: 3.00
ART218
Printmaking I
Introduction to planographic & intaglio printing processes.
Art/Design Fee: $300.00
Pre-requisites: ART111 & DES121
On demand Hours: 3.00
ART222
Studio Photography
Further exploration of digital photography emphasizing the photography studio environment and the effective use of related equipment, such as lighting and backdrops. Color photography will also be introduced.
Art/Design Fee: $300.00
Pre-requisites: ART123
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ART223
Darkroom Photography
Introduction to the art of 35-mm photography. Includes camera operation and black-and-white darkroom techniques needed to pursue the development of artistic principles in assembling a portfolio of black and white prints.
Art/Design Fee: $300.00
Pre-requisites: ART123
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ART224
History of Art I
A chronological overview of architecture and art from pre-history through the early Renaissance. Specific emphasis is placed on the cultural values which shape the arts and architecture.
Prereq: ENG101 or equivalent
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ART225
History of Art II
A survey of Western and Non-Western art history from Renaissance - Early Modernism.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART227
Illustration I
Introduction to the development of illustrations for commercial and editorial purposes. Emphasizes the process of ideation and research, from thumbnail to final image. Incorporates both freehand rendering techniques and digital tools.
Art and Design Fee: $200.00
Pre-requisites: ART212 & ART211 & DES231
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART245
Comic Books and Graphic Novels
With a survey that ranges from the pulp origins of superhero comic books to the contemporary debates about graphic storytelling, this course will examine comic books as a popular medium and as an art form. Ultimately, this course will examine various theories of graphic storytelling in order to better understand the visual and literacy sensibilities of contemporary culture. Texts will likely include: Will Eisner's A Contract with God , Alan Moore's Watchmen , Neil Gaiman's Sandman , and Craig Thompson's Goodbye, Chunky Rice .
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
ART295
Professional Practices in Art
This course will introduce students to many of the practical aspects of working as a professional artist, and prepare students for internship experiences. Subjects include documentation and display of work, record-keeping exhibiting in professional venues, and web and social media presence.
Requires sophomore standing and 15 hours of studio coursework completed, including : DES122, DES232, DES233, DES234 , ART211 and ART212, or permission of Instructor.
Must be at sophomore status before class begins.
Pre-requisites: ART123 & ART211 & ART212 & DES231
Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
ART311
Drawing III
Emphasis on drawing the human figure, with attention given to correct proportion, structure, and surface, including skeletal muscular and surface anatomy. Includes research into historical and contemporary precedents. Students must demonstrate proficiency.
Student must demonstrate proficiency.
Art/Design Fee: $225.00
Pre-requisites: ART211
Hours: 3.00
ART314
Watercolor
An advanced studio drawing and painting course with an emphasis on the development of watercolor technique. Attention will be given to traditional, experimental, and expressive approaches, and to composition. A research component is included.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Art/Design Fee: $225.00
Pre-requisites: ART212
On demand Hours: 3.00
ART315
Ceramics: Handbuilding
Emphasizes hand-building techniques in ceramic production, exploration of engobes, glazes and stains, kiln loading and firing, and research in contemporary ceramics. A short introduction to wheel-throwing is included.
Must be at sophomore status before class begins.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Hours: 3.00
ART316
Ceramics: Wheel Throwing
Emphasizes wheel throwing. Includes exploration of ceramic decoration, glazing and underglaze techniques, kiln loading and firing, and research in contemporary ceramics.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Hours: 3.00
ART319C
Intermediate Studio Critique
Instruction in the definition of artistic goals, presentation of finished work and work in progress; verbal and written defense. Self, peer, and instructor evaluation of goals, artistic achievement, and defense based on historical conceptual criteria. Must be taken concurrently with ART 319M.
Pre-req: 33 hrs of ART/DES/FLM prefixed courses.Must be taken concurrently with ART319M.
Pre-req: 33 hours of ART/DES/FLM prefixed courses. NOTE: Must be taken concurrently with ART319M.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Concurrent Requisites: ART319M
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART319M
Intermediate Studio Methods
Individualized instruction in fine art studio operations aimed at creative enhancement of productivity and quality, plus methods research and the examination of creative process as it applies to contemporary aesthetic issues. Includes professional practice component. Must be taken concurrently with ART319C.
Pre-req: 33 hrs of ART/DES/FLM prefixed courses.Must be taken concurrently with ART319C.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Pre-req: 33 hours of ART/DES/FLM prefixed courses.NOTE: Must be taken concurrently with ART319C.
Concurrent Requisites: ART319C
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART323
Advanced Photography
Exploration of color digital photography and digital output with continued development of the aesthetics of photography and the principles of portfolio assembly. Conceptual photographic practices will be introduced. Basic research component required.
Art/Design Fee: $300.00
Pre-requisites: ART222 OR ART223
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART324
History of Art III
Advanced study, research and writing involving a philosophical understanding of art history and theory from late modernism through the present (circa 1945-present).
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART330
History of Photography
This course will introduce students to the history of photographic technology and the evolution of aesthetics unique to the medium. In particular, the course will focus on major photographers such as Strand, DeCarava, Uelsman, and Liebovitz and architects of photographic theory such as Barthes, Sontag, and Metz.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ART395
Internship Practicum in Art
Technician-level internship experience in a design, advertising, publishing or manufacturing firm. Supervision will include a faculty advisor and a corporate internship supervisor.
Requires 45 hours earned including DES228, ART295, DES321 or 18 hour of studio art courses. Must show computer literacy. Pre-registration required. Instructor's permission required. Offered for 2 to 3 credit hours.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
Pre-requisites: ART295
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ART396
Intrnship Practicum in Art
Intership experience in fine art, including photography. Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ART419C
Advanced Studio Critique
Continuation of ART319C with the development of advanced art projects.
Note: Must be taken concurrently with ART419M.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
NOTE: ART419C and ART419M must be taken concurrently.
Concurrent Requisites: ART419M
Pre-requisites: ART319C
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART419M
Advanced Studio Methods
Individualized instruction in fine art studio operations aimed at creative enhancement of productivity and quality, plus methods research and the examination of creative process as it applies to contemporary aesthetic issues. Includes professional practice component. Must be taken concurrently with ART419C.
Note: Must be taken concurrently with ART419C.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
NOTE: ART419C and ART419M must be taken concurrently.
Concurrent Requisites: ART419C
Pre-requisites: ART319M
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART427
Theories of the Visual
A consideration of objects and images and how they may build community or cause disengagement, including an examination of contemporary faith and practice as described by contemporary philosophers, theorists, Christians, and critics.
Pre-requisites: ART224 & ART225
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ART495
Advanced Internship Practicum
Designer-level internship experience in a design, advertising, publishing, or manufacturing firm, or individually planned research under faculty supervision.
Must show computer literacy.
Junior status.
Pre-requisites: ART395
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
ART496
Senior Proposal
Instructor-guided investigation of creative work in the student's chosen field and media leading to the proposal and preliminary work for Senior Project.
Requires senior standing and 30 hours of studio coursework completed. Student must demonstrate proficiency in the medium he/she proposes to use. General Art and Fine Arts Studio majors only. Permission of instructor requried.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Pre-requisites: MIDP 1 & ART319C & ART319M
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ART497
Senior Project
A summation of past work plus the development of new work in the student's major field, culminating in a public exhibition or portfolio presentation. Also includes written thesis and senior test in area concentration.
Student must demonstrate proficiency in the medium he/she proposes to use. Permission of Instructor required.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Pre-requisites: ART496
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
DES121
Design I
Broad investigation of design principles, process, and practice involving problems in two-dimensional design. Selected design applications are introduced. Priority seating for Art, Design and Architecture.
Art/Design Fee: $150.00
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
DES122
Three Dimensional Design
Three-Dimensional Design is a hands-on introduction to the manipulation of materials in space through a range of three-dimensional processes and media with an emphasis on idea generation for creative problem solving. The basic forming processes we will be considering may include additive and subtractive processes such as fabrication, casting, carving, and modeling.
Art/Design Fee: $150.00
Priority seating for Art and Design and Interior Design majors.
Pre-requisites: DES121
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
DES228
Typography I
Introduction to design concerns pertinent to typographical design, copyfitting, and analysis of letter forms including an introduction to the history of typography and the circumstances that influenced its progression. Typography problems will be approached with handwork and computer-aided design. A survey of typographic issues and problem-solving methodologies are introduced
Art/Design Fee: $300.00
Pre-requisites: DES121 & DES231
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
DES229
Typography II
Advanced problem-solving methodologies of typographic design will be introduced on how to manage typographical systems and the organization of information as well as integrating other elements like image, line, and shape. Students will work manually and digitally to create typographic compositions and develop typographic forms and characters.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Pre-requisites: DES228
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
DES231
Digital Tools
An introduction to standard software applications in the creative industries. Fundamental techniques of key applications, and basic design principles will be explored.
Art/Design Fee: $300.00
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
DES295
Prof Practices in Graphic Design
Catalog Text: This course will introduce students to many of the practical aspects of working as a professional designer, and prepare students for internship experiences.
Requires sophomore standing and 15 hours of studio coursework completed, including : DES122, DES232, DES233, DES234 and DES228 or permission of Instructor.
Must be at sophomore status before class begins.
Pre-requisites: DES228
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
DES321
Graphic Design I
Basic design applied to actual commercial graphic design problems. Practical techniques will be learned from conception to finish of project, which culminates in client presentation.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: DES228
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
DES322
Graphic Design II
Continuation of Graphic Design I, Instruction will concentrate on typography, packaging and four-color work. Extensive use of computer-aided layout and design also will be included.
Art and Design Fee: $200.00
Pre-requisites: DES321
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
DES327
History of Graphic Design
A selective survey of the history of visual communications from the 19th C. through contemporary. Critical readings, individualized research, and studio work in modern and contemporary design issues.
In addition to ART224, DES228, and DES321 9 hours of DES-prefixed studio courses (or accepted equivalent transfer courses) and permission of instructor are required.
NOTE: In addition to ART224 & DES228, 12 hours of DES-prefixed studio courses (or accepted equivalenttransfer courses) and permission of the instructor is required. Override only if pre-reqs are met.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
DES331
Web Design I
Investigation of design for the web involving issues in consumer interface, progressive disclosure in virtual space, and problem solving methodologies specific to web design. Includes an individual research component. Adobe Flash and Adobe Dreamweaver will be utilized throughout this course. Research problems specific to web design will be introduced and explored.
Instructor may override prereqs
Art and Design Fee: $200.00
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
DES332
Web Design II
Investigation of design for the web involving issues in consumer design and problem solving methodologies specific to web design. Latest web technologies and programing will be utilized throughout this course. Dynamic content-driven website design will be taught and explored. Includes an individual research component.
Instructor may override prereq.
Art and Design Fee: $200.00
Pre-requisites: DES331 & DES321
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
DES340
Production Methods
Introduces the student to production methods for print media, concentrating on the principles of production management, which include communication, economic impact and change management.
Art/Design Fee: $400.00
Pre-requisites: DES322
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
DES395
Internship Pract in Graphic Des
Internship experience in Graphic Design.
Pre-requisites: DES295
Fall, Spring & Summer Hours: 2.00
DES420
Advanced Graphic Design
Advanced course in the analysis of visual communications problems with group collaborations developing content, evaluating alternatives and creating prototypical solutions.
Junior status.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: DES322 & DES331
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
DES495
Advanced Internship Practicum
Designer-level internship experience in a design, advertising, publishing, or manufacturing firm, or individually planned research under faculty supervision.
Must show computer literacy.
Junior status.
Pre-requisites: DES395
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
DES496
Senior Proposal
Instructor-guided investigation of creative work in the student's chosen field and media leading to the proposal and preliminary work for Senior Project.
Requires senior standing and 33 hours of studio coursework completed. Permission of instructor required.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: DES322 & DES331 & MIDP 1
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
DES497
Senior Project
A summation of past work plus the development of new work in the student's major field, culminating in a portfolio presentation. Also includes written thesis and senior test in area concentration.
Permission of Instructor required.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: DES496
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
FLM241
Media Theory I
The course examines history of media forms from print to photography, from television to the internet (and beyond) through the lens of theory. Student will analyze these media forms as both reflections and initiators of societal attitudes and values.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
FLM242
Media Theory II
The course more deeply develops a theoretical framework enabling students to analyze media forms such as photography, film, comics books, animation, television, and video games. Students will study and evaluate various theories of spectatorship, media influence, hypertextual psychology, and game theory.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
FLM243
Video Production I
The course introduces the basics of video editing, shooting, and production techniques. Students will develop an understanding of video presentation and storytelling. In turn, the course deals with making short video for clients in corporate and church/nonprofit settings.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
FLM281
Introduction to Film
The course will deal with film as a popular and high art form, with particular attention paid to developing the interpretive skills specific to viewing film. Through a close 'reading' of classics and contemporary films, this course will demonstrate how film both maintains certain conventions unique to the medium and changes due to cultural context. Fall or Spring every yr Hours: 3.00
FLM295
Prof Practices in Film and Video
Portfolio and resume development, job search methods and interview techniques, in preparation for external internships.
Requires sophomore standing and 15 hours of studio coursework completed, including : DES122, DES232, DES233, DES234 and FLM243 or permission of Instructor.
Must be at sophomore status before class begins.
Pre-requisites: DES231 & FLM243
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
FLM330
Documentary Filmmaking
The course will focus on creating documentary films to communicate effectively to a targeted audience. Students will learn how to develop a project idea, construct a narrative from real world footage, and make suitable aesthetic choices in post-production. Students will learn to evaluate documentary stories in practical, ethical, and artistic terms.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: FLM243
On demand Hours: 3.00
FLM339
Advanced Video Production
This course will cover all aspects of preproduction, production, and post production in the filmmaking process, including specific skills needed in the production of commercial film including motion graphics and moving text, greenscreen compositing, digital set extension, and particle effects such as smoke, fire, and explosions. It will combines all fundamental and sophisticated skills learned in previous classes and moves students toward fully realized film projects. The emphasis will be on how to use limited resources to develop a fully realized film project in a short amount of time.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: FLM330 OR FLM343
On demand Hours: 3.00
FLM343
Video Production II
The course moves students greater competencies with practices introduced in Video Production I. Students will develop a professional understanding of video principles and how these principles apply to a range of audiences and communication tasks. The course will prepare students to produce high-level video products with messages are effective in communication and appropriate for the occasion/subject.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: FLM243
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
FLM344
Film History I: American Cinema
The course introduces U.S. films ranging from American cinema's 19th century origins to the present. Students will understand and analyze the standards of filmmaking established in the golden age of Hollywood, challenged by the American independent scene, and revaluated by contemporary producers of both blockbusters and art house films. Prominent films likely included are Curtiz's Casablanca, Welles' Citizen Kane, Spielberg's Close Encounters, and Tarantino's Pulp Fiction.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
FLM345
Film History II: World Cinema
The course introduces films from around the world ranging from cinema's 19th century origins to the present. Students will understand European, Asian, and Middle Eastern innovations in film through their particular cultural, aesthetic, and technological contexts. Prominent films likely included are Eisenstein's The Battleship Potemkin, DeSica's The Bicycle Thief, Kurosawa's Rashomon, and Kieslowski's Red.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
FLM395
Internship Pract in Film & Video
The course provides two to three credits for a prearranged internship experience. Students will take on a technician-level internship experience that requires students significantly contribute to the production of a short film/video assignment. Supervision will include a faculty advisor and a corporate internship supervisor.
Pre-requisites: FLM295
On demand Hours: 2.00
FLM495
Advanced Internship Practicum
Designer-level internship experience in a design, advertising, publishing, or manufacturing firm, or individually planned research under faculty supervision.
Must show computer literacy.
Co-requisites: FLM395
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
FLM496
Senior Proposal
The course offers an instructor-guided investigation of work in the student's areas of interest and specialization leading to the proposal and preliminary work for Senior Project. Students must demonstrate proficiency in the advanced skills of filmmaking.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: FLM343 & FLM339 & FLM330 & ART319M & ART319C & FLM395 & MIDP 1
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
FLM497
Senior Project
The course is a culmination of past work with students working cooperatively to plan, produce, and complete a full-fledged film project to be publically screened.
Art and Design Fee: $250.00
Pre-requisites: FLM496
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
INT322
Building Systems
Continues the exploration of the role of the interior designer with an emphasis on construction, assemblies, and finishes typical of commercial buildings.
Pre-requisites: ARC222
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
INT323
Textiles, Materials and Sourcing
Exploration of the role of the interior designer with an emphasis on material research and its use in the design of interior space. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
INT324
Building Codes/Universal Design
To provide critical thinking and skills as it relates to the interior environment and human centered spaces; to provide for the promotion of legal requirements and appropriate design sensibilities for the health, safety and welfare of the occupants of an interior environment. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
INT328
Case Studies/Construction Detail
Exploration of the role of the interior designer with an emphasis on practical knowledge and use of drawing conventions in the documentation and implementation of design work for construction. Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
INT331
History of Interiors/Furnishings
This course is a survey of the history of interior design and furnishings over the past 150 years of design. Students will explore the most recent eras of design history and theory and the cultural and social forces that guided them, toward a better understanding of the design enterprise today. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
INT351
ID Studio I, Space Planning, Ergonomics
To teach students the basics of interior planning processes, as it relates to human needs and functions; including anthropometrics, ergonomics and circulation of building spaces.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: ARC252
Every Fall Semester Hours: 5.00
INT352
ID Studio II, Residentail, Kitchen, and Bath
To teach students the processes of interior planning as it relates to human needs and functions within a residential setting; including universal design, sustainable practices and safety criteria, codes and design concepts.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: INT351
Every Spring Semester Hours: 5.00
INT381
Interior Design Study Tour
Observe and analyze selected international urban, architecture and interiors using various methods and media. Visits to museums may be included. On-site design project may be featured.
NOTE: Open to any SOADA student accepted to third-year. This course has a supply fee of $100.00 and a trip/travel fee of $5,600.00. Please attend informational meetings for itinerary, required preparations and specific detail.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Preq: Third Year Acceptance
NOTE: Open to any SOADA student accepted to third year. This course has a supply fee of $5,600. Please attend informational meetingsfor itinerary, required preparations and specific details.
Every Summer Hours: 5.00
INT428
Case Studies in Lighting and Acoustics
This course explores the immaterial, temporal and phenomenal aspects of spatial design for inhabited interior environments. Lighting and acoustics, although immaterial, play a significant role in fashioning gracious, functional and inspiring spaces for people. This course will emphasize the qualitative, aesthetic and energy performance considerations in designing interiors for environmental stewardship.
Pre-requisites: INT322 & INT323
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
INT451
ID Studio III, Commercial Contract/Healthcare
Interior design research and studio exploration of project types in commercial interiors with a focus on healthcare and evidence based design.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: INT352
Every Fall Semester Hours: 5.00
INT452
ID Studio, IV, Integrative Design Thesis
Interior design research and studio exploration of project types through an individual design thesis.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: INT451
Every Spring Semester Hours: 5.00
INT462
Interior Design Professional Practice
The course prepares students for design practice by exploring subjects of design identity development, portfolio development, project management, and practices management. Students will investigate the regulations and insurance issues related to independent professional practice for designers. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MED144
Communication/Media Experience
A series of experiences outside the classroom designed to expose students to a wider world of communication and media. Students will choose two of three field trip experiences in the Chicagoland area and participate in discussions on the experiences in person and on discussion boards. Possible destinations include: the Chicago Art Institute, the Gene Siskel Film Center, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Chicago International Film Festival, and the Chicago Shakespeare Theater.
Enrollment by professor after registration period
Art/Design Fee: $50.00
Every Semester Hours: 0.50
Business Undergraduate 2017-2018
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
BUS101
Introduction to Business
Provides an overview of business including the various responsibilities and different forms of business, principles of management, operations management, human resource management, management information systems, marketing, finance and accounting, and business law. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS102
Accounting Fundamentals
This course presents accounting as an information system that measures, processes, and communicates financial information useful for making business decisions.
This course is for non-business majors.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
BUS222
Comprehensive MS Office Applic
A hands-on lab of Microsoft Office software packages specifically, word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation graphics, with applications in decision making and analysis in business and management. Every Semester Hours: 4.00
BUS241
Basic Macroeconomics
(IAI S3901) Provides an introduction to the measurement, analysis, and operation of the components of a country's economy. Covers national output, income, employment, money supply and value, interaction with other national economies and various theoretical models of national economic activity.
Pre-requisites: MAT1**** OR MAT2****
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS242
Basic Microeconomics
(IAI S3902) Focuses on economic functions, choices, and actions of individuals, businesses and governments. Covers the function of prices in the allocation of resources, the composition of output, the distribution of income. Contrasts market-directed systems with centrally planned and directed economies.
Pre-requisites: MAT1**** OR MAT2****
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS250
Management Principles
Introduces the role of the administrator or manager in the business environment, emphasizing: interactions between the manager and superiors, subordinates and peers; the functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling; and the administrative skills of communication, decision making, and team management. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS251
Financial Accounting
Covers accounting for business and the preparation of accounting information.
MAT111 may also be taken as a coreq.
Pre-requisites: MAT1**** OR MAT2****
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS253
Business Law I
Introduces the law, courts, and legal system: tort law and liability; contract formation and the doctrine of consideration; contractual capacity; illegal contracts and contract provisions; the law of sales under the Uniform Commercial Code; warranties and products liability law; and negotiable instruments.
Preq: Any business course.
Must be at sophomore status before class begins.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS255
Principles of Marketing
In this course, students are exposed to a survey of the key concepts in marketing, including consumer orientation, market and consumer analyses, strategy development, segmentation, positioning, and the marketing mix.
Co-requisites: BUS242
Pre-requisites: BUS242
Fall, Spring & Summer Hours: 3.00
BUS261
Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting
This course focuses on the application of internal financial data for use by management in decision making. Topics include forecasting, budgeting, cost control, quality control and performance evaluation.
Pre-requisites: BUS251
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS295
Sophomore Business Practicum
Students practice skills acquired in internship business-related courses in businesses and/or industrial firms with supervision by college faculty. Requires a minimum of 10-15 hours per week on the job. Course may be repeated; however, a maximum of six hours will count toward graduation.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
BUS301
Leadership and Change
Reviews the basic principles of leadership in organizations, current motivational theory, and how leaders cope with and create change. Emphasizes the underlying principles of leadership theory and how individuals can train themselves to be effective leaders in various organizations.
Preq: BUS250 and must be at Junior or Senior status when the classbegins. All others will be dropped from the class withoutinstructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: BUS250
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS326
Human Resource Management
Studies principles of psychological knowledge as applied to a business organization, including motivation and incentive theory, personnel selection, leadership, human factors engineering, career development and work environment.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hoursearned) when the class begins and/or have approved workexperience All others will be dropped from theclass without instructors authorization.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR SOC151
Hours: 3.00
BUS340
Intermediate Accounting I
Studies accounting theory as applied to funds flow and preparation of financial statements. Examines earnings and valuation of assets and qualitative factors used in analysis of financial statements.
Pre-requisites: BUS251 & BUS261
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS341
Intermediate Accounting II
Covers stockholder's equity, leases, pensions, translation of currency, and reporting disclosures for financial statements.
Pre-requisites: BUS340
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS343
Money, Banking, Finance
Analyzes money and the banking system and their relation to the economy.
Pre-requisites: BUS241 & BUS242
Fall Hours: 3.00
BUS344
Personal Finance
Emphasizes through in-class simulation the processes for handling real-life financial issues: major purchases, funding college education, and retirement. Challenges students to develop the discipline to make positive financial decisions and balance life priorities.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS345
Integrated Mktg Communications
Students in IMC will learn the value of creating a consistent marketing message that will build a brand image for consumers. This course will explore internal and external communications in the form of advertising, publicity, packaging, and promotional items that are offered through mass media both hard copy and digital formats.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: BUS255
Spring Hours: 3.00
BUS346
Consumer Behavior
Students will be introduced to the variables that influence the decisions of individuals or groups to have or consume goods and services. They also will learn how producers of goods and services use these variables to influence consumer choices of goods and services.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: BUS255
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS347
Business Communication
This course integrates principles of oral and written communication with real-world business problems and opportunities to help students succeed in their chosen career fields. It enables the student to understand the foundations of business communication and to know how to plan, organize, compose and revise various forms of communication. Students will also prepare and deliver group presentations and participate in mock interviews.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: SPC120 & ENG102 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS348
International Business
This course will address the global and national business environments, international trade and investment, international financial system, and international business management. Special emphasis will be placed on cultural and religious influence on international business practices.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: BUS241
Spring Hours: 3.00
BUS349
Corporate Finance
Emphasizes the role of finance in a corporation, financial markets, financial analysis and planning, and capital budgeting. Covers cost of capital, capital structure, working capital and its management, and sources of long term capital.
Pre-requisites: BUS261
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS352
Cost Accounting
Covers inventory planning and control, budgeting, process costing, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, accounting systems, and distribution-cost analysis.
Pre-requisites: BUS261
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS353
Tax Accounting
Covers current tax laws, accounting for income and deductions, reporting responsibilities, and preparation of tax returns.
Pre-requisites: BUS251
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS357
Strategic Planning
Examines fundamental issues underlying an organization's development of effective strategies to achieve its goals. Includes establishing the corporate mission and goals; analyzing the external environment, assessing internal strengths and weaknesses, identifying competitive advantages, developing related strategies, decision-making, and writing a corporate plan.
NOTE: Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned)when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the classwithout instructor's authorization.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: BUS250
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS361
Professional Selling
This is a skill based course that examines the elements of professional selling including buyer behavior, prospecting, needs analysis, relationship management, handling objections, closing, follow-up and organizing time. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
BUS364
Digital Marketing
This course examines the use of digital technology as part of an organization's marketing strategy. Student will become well versed in current digital marketing methods and tactics, including, but not limited to: search engine optimization, online advertising, email marketing, and mobile marketing. This course will also address monitoring and analytics to refine and improve digital marketing efforts. An emphasis within this course will empower students to adapt to rapid changes in technology and tools.
Pre-requisites: BUS255
Spring Hours: 3.00
BUS367
Content/Social Media Marketing
This course examines the use of new media within organizational settings. Students will build foundational knowledge and professional skills to create and promote an organization's brand story through content development and social media. Students will learn to use the current top social media tools, create a content plan, and develop a social media strategy that aligns with an organization's marketing objectives. Additionally, students will establish a professional brand strategy for themselves. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS410
Marketing Management
Covers components of marketing from a problem-oriented perspective employing extensive use of the case study method. Students will be challenged to apply the basic concepts learned in introductory marketing courses to business situations through the use of the case study method and an interactive competitive simulation. Over all course emphasis will be on the development of sound consistent marketing strategies and effective implementation of the market mix.
Pre-requisites: BUS255 & BUS250
Spring Hours: 3.00
BUS412
Project Management
An overview of project management consisting of: understanding what a project is and the various phases of a project; evaluating the project against organizational objectives, cost-benefit and systems impact criteria; developing an implementation plan to meet organizational and project objectives; identifying barriers such as resistance to change; dealing with conflict management; and identifying style as it relates to project management.
Pre-requisites: BUS250
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS423
Ethics in Business and Accounting
This course is a two-part study of ethics for business students. The first part is an in-depth introduction to ethics in the major areas of business; such as management, accounting, finance, marketing, international business, and leadership. The purpose of the course is to enable future business professionals to better understand the moral challenges they will face. Whereas, business ethics focuses on what is morally right and wrong in business, Christian ethics deals with what is morally right and wrong for a Christian. Therefore, the second component of this course is comparative study of secular ethics to Christian ethics. Spring Hours: 3.00
BUS443
Public Relations
Students examine public relations as a profession and a practice, including the planning, implementation and evaluation of public relations campaigns. The course includes study of the nature, ethics problems and significance of public relations in the digital age.
NOTE: Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned)when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the classwithout instructor's authorization.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: SPC120 & ENG102 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Fall Hours: 3.00
BUS451
Advanced Accounting
Concentrates on accounting for partnerships, income distribution and liquidation. Includes: intracompany transactions, business combinations, bankruptcies, governmental and nonprofit organizations.
Pre-requisites: BUS341
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS452
Auditing
Covers auditing principles and procedures, standards, examination of financial statements and supporting records, internal controls, working papers and auditors' reports.
Pre-requisites: BUS341
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS454
Entrep/New Venture Management
Covers the skills and business strategies necessary for creating and implementing a successful small business, professional practice, or not for profit organization. Additional topics include the characteristics of entrepreneurs, the analysis of the economic climate, techniques for creativity and innovation of new ideas and/or products securing technical and financial support, and the knowledge required to manage a business in its early stages of growth. A business product and/or not for profit organization that would fulfill a consumer need will be identified and researched in terms of legal constraints, competition, and consumer market.
Pre-requisites: BUS251 OR BUS344
Spring Hours: 3.00
BUS455
Senior Management Seminar
This senior-level capstone course provides students with the opportunity to put into action the learning and skills gained from their course of study in a hands-on, real-world setting. Students will also consider how they will position and market themselves in the workforce.
Must be at Senior standing (at least 90 hours earned) when class begins.All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: BUS255 & BUS250 & BUS222
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS456
Investments
Provides fundamental concepts related to financial investments for personal and professional portfolio management. Includes: investment theory, capital market theory, changing investment environment and regulation, stock analysis and fixed income security analysis.
Instructor may override prereq
Pre-requisites: BUS349
Spring Hours: 3.00
BUS461
Accounting Research and Analysis
This course is designed to build upon previous accounting and research assignments in upper level accounting courses. Accounting majors will be challenged to identify accounting issues; locate and research appropriate accounting concepts, standards, statements, pronouncements, or tax authorities; provide a thorough analysis; formulate a response; and articulate recommendations. Students will prepare organized/structured written papers utilizing appropriate format. Areas of research will include, but will not be limited to, SFACs, FASs, SASs, the Internal Revenue Code, and Treasury regulations. The course will include a review of current trends in accounting thought and accounting theory - with instructor selected emphasis in on current issue area.
Pre-requisites: BUS340 & BUS341
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS462
Marketing Research
This course provides an overview of the marketing research process. Students will be exposed to key concepts in marketing research including research management, research design, data generation, data analysis and results implementation. Practical experience is gained through the team execution of a marketing research project.
Pre-requisites: BUS255 & MAT311
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BUS495
Sr Business Practicum/Internship
Upper division students practice skills acquired in business-related courses in businesses and/or industrial firms with supervision by college faculty. Requires a minimum of 10-15 hours per week on the job. Course may be repeated; however, a maximum of six hours will count toward graduation.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 6.00
ITS121
Intro to Information Technology
This overview course is designed to introduce students to the nature of Information Technology Systems (ITS) by familiarizing them with key terms and concepts as well as providing exposure to ITS applications through case studies. Hours: 3.00
ITS225
Application Development Using C#
A course to familiarize students with the principles of application design and development using C++.
Pre-requisites: ITS224
Hours: 3.00
ITS310
Systems Analysis and Design
The emphasis of this course is on the strategies and techniques of structural analysis and design for producing logically developed systems, regardless of the application or the purpose for which the system is designed. The learning taking place in this course should be transferable to any analysis and design situation. Hours: 3.00
ITS315
Business Data Communications
This is a fundamental course in data communications, introducing students to terminology and concepts of networking and communication providing a basic understanding of fundamental transmission concepts underlying current data communications practices used in business; an introduction to techniques employed in the design and analysis of communication networks; a survey of management issues concerning network planning, implementation and administration; a cursory overview of commercial networking hardware and software products and the methodologies used for their evaluation; and in a framework for assessing the strategic uses of communication networks in business. Hours: 3.00
ITS319
Database Management
Recognizing that most companies have an MIS department or a technology staff, it is not the intent of this course to teach the student to be a competent database programmer, but that he or she has sufficient knowledge and understanding to make informed requests and assessments of the work being done. Students will be introduced to query language, search strategies and user interfaces using MS Access. Hours: 3.00
ITS356
Introduction to Web Development
This course focuses on the concepts and tactics for adapting marketing direction in response to customer needs, wants and demands. Marketing has become a conversation in which customers give feedback in word and deed. Organizations must be adaptable enough to respond and change direction to satisfy customers. Hours: 3.00
ITS395
ITS Practicum
Upper division students practice skills acquired in business-related courses in businesses and/or industrial firms with supervision by college faculty. Requires a minimum of 10-15 hours per week on the job. Course may be repeated; however, a maximum of six hours will count toward graduation. Hours: 3.00
ITS495
ITS Practicum
Upper division students practice skills acquired in business-related courses in businesses and/or industrial firms with supervision by college faculty. Requires a minimum of 10-15 hours per week on the job. Course may be repeated; however, a maximum of six hours will count toward graduation. Hours: 3.00
Division of Education Undergraduate 2017-2018
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
EDU101
Explorations in Education
Individuals considering the education profession will receive an induction to the professional culture of teacher education a Judson University. Communication and leadership skills will be developed while incorporating the School of Education's Conceptual Framework, dispositions, the Illinois Code of Ethics for Educators, and other relevant topics. Contemporary issues involving diverse learners will be explored.
Co-requisites: EDU131
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU102
Day of Assessments
Pre-candidates will demonstrate abilities in the areas of oral communication, reading aloud, problem-solving, and leadership in this multi-faceted series of assessments. Faculty will evaluate pre-candidates to determine readiness to enter the School of Education and the teaching profession. Formal application to the School of Education will be permitted upon successful completion of the assessments. If the pre-candidate is not successful, the course may be repeated once after individual remediation occurs.
Co-requisites: EDU101
Every Spring Semester Hours: 0.00
EDU131
Practicum I, Diversity
Pre-candidates/Candidates give evidence of completion of an approved diversity experience. A log and paper are required and will be evaluated by the School of Education. Minimum involvement of 12 clock hours is expected. Every Semester Hours: 0.00
EDU201
Strategic Education
This course presents current approaches in planning for differentiated instruction based on P-12 Illinois state learning standards or Common core Standards while incorporating multiple and varies assessments for diverse learners. Pre-candidates will observe and discuss a variety of methods of classroom management. Additional topics such as advocacy, schools as organizations within the community, and school emergency procedures will be explored. Procedures for formally applying to the School of Education will be presented.
Co-requisites: EDU231E
Pre-requisites: EDU102
Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
EDU202
Development and Learning
In this course pre-candidates/candidates will investigate how physical, social, linguistic, cognitive, moral, and information processing differences affect learning, motivation, and classroom behavior. Pre-candidates/candidates will also learn and apply research, concepts, and theories of development and learning to influence instructional planning and delivery.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 & EDU101 OR PSY111H
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU214
Foundation of Language Minority Education
This course offers an overview of the historical, sociological, philosophical, political and legislative foundations of language minority education. Specific topics include legal, historical, and social perspective; multi-cultural perspectives with implications for bilingual education; program models; approaches to language minority education in other countries; and current national and state issues in language minority education. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU231E
Practicum II,Tchr Aid,Elgin Area
Candidates spend four to six hours a week for a minimum of 35 hours serving as teacher aides in a multicultural classroom. A minimum of one observation by college faculty occurs during EDU231E. Practicum IIE is a letter-graded experience.
Practicum Fee: $25.00
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 0.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
EDU231H
Practicum II, Tchr Aid, Hometown
Candidates serve 1 week full-time (minimum of 30 clock hours) as an aide to a teacher in a hometown school in a classroom applicable to the certification in which they are seeking during one of the university vacation periods or post terms. Practicum IIH is pass/fail. For additional information see Practicum II handbooks. Every Spring and Summer Hours: 0.00
EDU301
Reflecting on the Conversation
This course will further expose candidates to current topics within the profession of education. Candidates will reflect upon the issues presented and determine applications to their own teaching. In addition, candidates will reflect upon how their Judson experiences are shaping them as individuals and educators within communities and cultures.
Pre-requisites: GEN101 & EDU201
Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
EDU302
Methods of Teaching Young Children Math and Science
Provides an integrated and thematic approach to the theory, curriculum, and methods of instruction and assessment of mathematics and natural sciences with young children. Examines the needs of young children with respect to activity/learning centers, individualization, educational play and media.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU303
Curriculum Planning and Assessment
Examines developmentally appropriate integrated curriculum and program planning, classroom management and environment, parent role and involvement, and multiple and varied assessments through a hands-on approach. A social studies unit must be constructed.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 3.00
EDU308
Language Dvlpmt/Young Children
Provides a review of the significant aspects of the history of English and its instruction; examines the various theories of language acquisition and development in young children with their relationships to developmental theories and stages of learning. Includes the 5 concepts of language knowledge: phonemic, semantic, syntactic, morphemic and pragmatic. Examines emergent literacy for all learners.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU311
Technology Instruction/Teachers of Language Minority Students
The use of computers and interactive media for instructional purposes in linguistically and culturally diverse classrooms is discussed. The selection and use of software and interactive media within various content areas are also presented. Demonstrations of software and hands-on activities are included to provide teachers with the information necessary to successfully integrate technology instruction into their classrooms and to select second language software to enhance learning in the content area. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU313
Cross-Cultural Education
This course examines diverse cultures and how they differ and are the same relating to: religion, politics, economics, ideology, education and social order. We read about cultural universals so that candidates will have a better understanding of the needs of the underrepresented populations. We will discuss strategies that promote understanding, tolerance, overcoming prejudice and that celebrate diversity. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU314
Assessment of English Language Learners
This course will provide participants with a comprehensive knowledge foundation in the study and development of language programs for ESL/Bilingual students. It will have an emphasis on the review of various bilingual and dual language program models as well as assessment of English Language Learners (ELLs). The course promotes the use of balanced assessment models for students' evaluation and gives attention to the development of valid and effective teacher-made tests that include a variety of question types, modalities, promote higher-order thinking, and provides allowances for students with different learning needs. Participants investigate a variety of language assessments tools including journals, logs, portfolios, group projects, reflective papers, student interviews, self-evaluations, and meta-cognition. Participants will relate the usefulness and applicability of particular assessment tools and models to appropriate elements in lesson planning and instruction. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU316
Linguistic Considerations for Reading and Writing/New Language
This course will explore the process of reading in a second language as compared to reading in a first language. Methods and strategies for developing second language reading skills will be developed and explained. Candidates will explore and evaluate second language reading materials and will examine traditional grammar studies as they apply the development of writing in a second language.
Pre-requisites: EDU214
Spring & Summer 3 Week Hours: 3.00
EDU317
Methods/Materials of Teaching English as a Second Language
This course focuses on the relevant topics concerning English as a second language. Students will master strategies for teaching English to speakers of other languages using naturalistic second language learning strategies and methods. Applications to particular groups of different ages, abilities levels, and cultural backgrounds are presented. Strategies that foster both language acquisition and academic achievement in speaking, reading, writing, and listening will be presented.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Pre-requisites: EDU214
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU318
Methods and Materials for Teaching Bilingual Education
This course is designed to provide strategies, methods, and materials that are appropriate for teaching bilingual students. The emphasis of the course will be on examining and supporting children's literacy development in the native language, as well as learning the content areas. Techniques for managing multilevel classrooms and curriculum development will be studied. Throughout the course, we will discuss what the research and the practice of master teachers indicate about how children develop as readers and writers.
Instructor may overide prereqs.
Pre-requisites: EDU214
Every Summer Hours: 3.00
EDU320
Language/Literacy Development
Integrates communication skills used in language arts. Includes theory, curriculum, methods, materials and pedagogy for teaching written and oral expression, spelling, grammar, listening, poetry and literature to elementary and middle school students. To be taken the fall semester of the junior year.
Pre-requisites: EDU102
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU321
Processes of Reading
Examines the nature of the reading processes with which beginning readers learn to read. Attention will be given to the affective components that influence the process. The literacy environment is discussed with a heavy emphasis placed on the various instructional strategies, approaches and programs that are used to help meet the needs of diverse learners in preschool through 3rd grade. Phonemic awareness, phonics, guided reading, and instruction of reading strategies is incorporated.
IRC Membership Fee: $25.00
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU322
Mathematics Methods-Elementary
Gives the theoretical, mathematical, and pedagogical background necessary for teaching mathematics with meaning to elementary and middle school students.
Also requires six hours of college mathematics
Also requires six hours of college mathematics. Override ONLY if thisrequirement has been satisified.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU323
Methods of Engaging Readers and Writers - Intermediate
Examines the nature of the reading and writing process and the affective components that influence it. Various instructional strategies and approaches are introduced to help meet the needs of diverse learners in intermediate grades as they learn to comprehend text at a deeper level and speak and write about the meaning. Attention is given to beginning readers and writers, struggling readers and writers, and advanced or gifted readers and writers. Guided reading, literature circles, literature study, vocabulary strategies, and book chats, interactive read alouds, writing workshop, mentor texts, and writing skills are incorporated.
Pre-requisites: EDU321
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU324
Social Studies Meth-Elementary
Gives theoretical and pedagogical background for teaching social studies in grades K-8. Much consideration is given to helping all students comprehend content area texts. Candidates may actively participate and demonstrate learning in authentic environments with diverse student populations.
For ELED major (not ECED)
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Fall and Summer Hours: 3.00
EDU325
Literacy Across the Curriculum
Examines theory and application related to secondary-school literacy and literacy in the content areas. Emphasis is on content-area reading, writing, listening, and speaking with practical strategies and illustrations using examples of content-area material from various subject areas. Presented to pre-service teachers preparing for secondary-school and K-12 licensure. Taken concurrently with or after methods courses for all major or with instructor permissions.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU327
Science Methods-Elementary
Gives the theoretical and pedagogical background for teaching science in grades K-6. Candidates understand the importance of science as process and product incorporating the use of process skills in inquiry-based learning. Curriculum topics addressed are designed to be modified to meet the needs of each learner including diverse, ELL, special education, and gifted.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU330
Child,Famly/Commnty Relationship
Provides for understanding the needs and emotions of the young child and the significant adult. Considers the relationships and integration of the child, family and community together to provide for the optimum development of young children. Includes diversity and exceptionality of children and familiy.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 3.00
EDU331B1
Clinical I: ESL/Bilingual Clinical
This experience helps develop future ESL educators. Students will observe ESL teachers in their educational environment, be acquainted with the curriculum and materials available for ESL students, observe methods and strategies in teaching language minority students and participate in the teaching of language for ESL students. 50 hours of classroom time is required.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU214
Every Sem & Sum 3 Week Hours: 1.50
EDU331B2
Clinical II: ESL/Bilingual Clinical
This experience helps develop future Bilingual educators. Students will observe Bilingual teachers in their educational environment, be acquainted with the curriculum and materials available for ESL students, observe methods and strategies in teaching language minority students and participate in the teaching of language for Bilingual students. 50 hours of classroom time is required.
Instructor may override prereqs
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU214
Every Sem & Sum 3 Week Hours: 1.50
EDU331E
Practicum III, Instruct Asst Elementary Education
Elementary education majors serve as instructional assistants for full days, five days a week for a four week period. The candidates observe, assist in teacher-related activities, work with individuals or small groups of students, and begin with teaching one lesson and progress to teaching a minimum of two lessons a day. A minimum of two observations by the university supervisor takes place during this practicum.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Practicum Fee: $25.00
Pre-requisites: EDU324
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
EDU331EC
Practicum III, Instr Asst Early Childhood Education
Early childhood education majors serve as instructional assistants for full days, five days a week for a four week period. The candidates observe, assist in teacher-related activities, work with individuals or small groups of students, and begin with teaching one lesson and progress to teaching a minimum of two lessons a day. A minimum of two observations by the university supervisor takes place during this practicum.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Practicum Fee: $25.00
Pre-requisites: EDU308
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
EDU331PE
Practicum III,Instr Asst,Phys Ed
Physical education (K-12) majors serve as instructional assistants the equivalent of four full weeks of instruction during the spring and/or summer (May) at a level not included in student teaching. The candidates observe, assist in teacher-related activities, work with individuals or small groups of students, and begin with teaching one lesson and progress to teaching a minimum of two lessons a day. A minimum of two observations by the university supervisor takes place during this practicum.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Practicum Fee: $25.00
Pre-requisites: ESS341
Summer 3 Week Term (May) Hours: 1.00
EDU331S
Practicum III,Inst Asst, Sec Edu
Secondary education majors serve as instructional assistants for the equivalent of four full weeks of instruction during the spring and/or summer (May). This is a teaching practicum at either the middle school or high school level and is typically completed at level to complement the anticipated student teaching experience. The candidates observe, assist in teacher-related activities, work with individuals or small groups of students, and begin with teaching one lesson and progress to teaching a minimum of two lessons a day. A minimum of two observations by the university supervisor takes place during this practicum.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Practicum Fee: $25.00
Pre-requisites: EDU340
Every Spring and Summer Hours: 1.00
EDU331SPED
Practicum III,Inst Asst, SPED
Special education majors serve as instructional assistants for full days, five days a week for a four week period. The candidates observe, assist in teacher-related activities, work with individuals or small groups of students, and begin with teaching one lesson and progress to teaching a minimum of two lessons a day. A minimum of two observations by the university supervisor takes place during this practicum.Teacher Education program admission required.
Practicum Fee: $25.00
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: SPE313
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
EDU333
Methods of Processes of Writing - Primary
Examines the nature of the writing process how students learn how to write. Some attention will be given to the affective components that influence the process. Various instructional strategies, approaches and programs are introduced to help meet the needs of diverse learners in elementary grades. Attention is primarily given to beginning and struggling writers. Writing workshop, assessment, multiple genres and instruction of writing strategies is incorporated.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU337
Educational Assessments
Investigates the terminology (validity, reliability, bias and all aspects of assessment including the purposes of assessment (diagnostic, formative, summative) and means of assessment (formal, informal, traditional, alternative, self-assessment) including how to select and/or construct, score, and utilize the results of assessments to monitor performance, inform and direct instruction, assess student progress, and report aggregate as well as individual data. Candidates will also devise means for modifying assessments to accommodate diverse learners.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Co-requisites: EDU340
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU340
Intro to Secondary Methods
Examines the curricular concepts and instructional skills needed to meet the needs of each student that are common across disciplines, including (but not limited to) the basics of lesson and unit planning, classroom management, cooperative learning strategies, contemporary educational technologies, assessment methodologies (traditional and alternative), grading methodologies, grade book/record management and data analysis, and selection/evaluation of appropriate teaching materials. Significant attention will also be given to the development of each candidate's professional portfolio.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU341
English Methods-Secondary
This course will introduce students to a variety of English curriculum and appropriate methods for teaching in today's educational setting. It will have an emphasis on grammar, spelling, vocabulary, reading, writing, research, and the editing process. Students will examine a variety of literary materials available for the teaching of English and will practice techniques for their use. Emphasis will be made on determining future high school students' ability levels and adapting instruction to meet the needs of learners diverse in culture, language, learning style, physical ability, etc. In addition, literary materials will be selected and adapted to integrate these diverse abilities and better promote critical thinking. Furthermore, in order to develop better readers and writers across the high school curriculum, participants in this course will learn strategies for creating plans that encourage more reading and writing in the secondary classroom. Students will also explore related skills: classroom management, test construction, student evaluation, and unit planning among others.
Instructor may override prereqs
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU340
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU342
Mathematics Methods-Secondary
Curricular concepts, instructional skills and assessment methodologies are explored as they apply to teaching mathematics in middle schools and high schools. Multiple teaching techniques, contemporary content-specific technologies, and instructional materials appropriate to the respective content area are emphasized as a means to meeting the needs of each student.
Pre-req: EDU340 or Dean of the School of Education/Professor approval.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU340
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU345
Business Methods - Secondary
Investigates curriculum and methods for teaching all areas of business, including accounting, business law, career development, business communications, economics and personal finance, entrepreneurship, information technology, international business, management and marketing at the middle school and secondary grades, including use of dicipline-appropriate technologies. Offered spring semester.
Admission into teacher education program in secondary business, marketing and computer education.
Pre-requisites: EDU340
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU346
Science Methods - Secondary
Investigates curriculum and methods for teaching the physical and life sciences at the middle school and secondary grades, including use of discipline-appropriate technologies. Offered spring semester.
Admission into and good standing in the Secondary Social Science Program.
Pre-requisites: EDU340
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU347
Soc Science Methods - Secondary
Investigates curriculum and methods for teaching the behavioral sciences, economics, geography, and political science at the middle school and secondary grades with an emphasis on the teaching of history. Includes use of discipline-appropriate technologies. Offered spring semester.
Admission into and good standing in the Secondary Social Science Program
Pre-requisites: EDU340
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
EDU350
Practicum IV Post-Student Teaching Clinical
Candidates serve as instructional assistants in P-12 classrooms. The candidates observe, assist in teacher-related activities, and are responsible for teaching one to two lessons each day.
Practicum Fee: $25.00
Pre-requisites: EDU411
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
EDU411
Student Teaching
Taken concurrently with EDU491 (Senior Seminar), student teaching is the basic internship experience where candidates apply teaching and learning principles in local schools and classrooms, typically in districts U-46, 47, 300, 301 and 303. Candidates do their student teaching in their major and/or secondary teaching areas for a minimum of 14 weeks (12 semester hours of credit). Candidates enrolled in Early Childhood and K-12 specialist programs that require a student teaching experience divided between two different grade levels will student teach for 14 weeks (7 weeks at each grade level for 12 semester hours of credit). Candidates enrolled in a 'Certificate Only' program will complete a student teaching experience equivalent to all other candidates for 1/2 the number of credit hours.
All candidates must have (1)successfully passed the State of Illinois Content Area Exam prior to beginning student teaching*; (2)completed a minimum of two education courses in residence at Judson prior to student teaching; (3)met all other 'Gate 3' requirements for acceptance into student teaching, and (4)met all program specific prerequisites including (a)successful completion of foundation course work (EDU 222 and 223); (b)successful completion of or credit awarded for all pre-student teaching practicum experiences (EDU 131, 231E, 231H; 331EC/E/S/PE) and (c)successful completion of other program-specific coursework described below: Early Childhood: EDU 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308 Elementary Education: EDU 320, 321, 322, 323, 324 and 327 Secondary Programs: EDU 325, 340 and a secondary content-specific methods course (Secondary PE Majors must also have completed ESS341). K-12 Physical Education: EDU 325 and ESS 340 and 341
Student Teaching/edTPA Fee: $400.00
Co-requisites: EDU491
Pre-requisites: EDU331****
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 6.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
EDU421
Assessment and Intervention in Reading with Practicum
Examines specific problems in reading diagnosis and remediation, treating individual differences, and the application of reading skills to content fields. A variety of assessments are utilized to allow for meeting needs of struggling readers, and methods of helping each student to learn to read are incorporated. Candidates assess and tutor a student using the assessments and methods introduced in class. A diagnostic field experience tutoring a student for a minimum of 8-10 hours is required.
Pre-requisites: EDU321 OR SPE321
Every Summer Hours: 3.00
EDU491
Senior Seminar
Candidates will spend two hours per week sharing effective teaching and learning experiences while student teaching. The course emphasizes policy trends and procedures in education, diversity in the classroom, the certification process, and preparation for employment.
Co-requisites: EDU411
Pre-requisites: EDU331****
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
SPE105
Intro to Special Education
This course provides pre-candidates/candidates with an introduction to characteristics of atypical students and their educational needs. Pre-candidates/Candidates will participate in observatons of students with special needs and explore future occupational choices related to the field of special education. Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
SPE155
American Sign Language I
This course provides -re-candidates and candidates with an introduction to American Sign Language and gives them the opportunity to develop basic ability in both receptive and expressive sign language skills.
Co-requisites: SPE105
Every Fall Semester Hours: 2.00
SPE211
Assistive-Augmentative Technology
In this course students will investigate various technologies available to students with disabilities including deaf and hard of hearing, autism, learning disabilities, IDD, OHI, and other identified disorders, Discussions will focus on the psychological and physiological aspects of their use.
Pre-requisites: SPE105
Every Fall Semester Hours: 2.00
SPE222
Learning Environment
This course is an exploration of the learner's total environment as it influences the learning process for students with special needs, English Language Learners, and the typical developing child. Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
SPE233
Health, Nutrition and Safety
This course examines nutrition, health and safety skills for the child with disabilities. It covers nutritional concepts and the most common nutrition-related conditions that have an impact on our health. The course also covers different types of safety that children, with or without disabilities, should be aware of to keep them safe and healthy. This includes physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and spiritual dimensions in students' lives. It also includes learning about the many medications and how they mix with other medications that children with disabilities may take. Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
SPE255
American Sign Language II
This course is the second half of the beginning American Sign Language sequence. Students will continue to acquire and improve their ability to use both receptive and expressive sign language skills.
Preq: SPE155 and proficiency test.
Pre-requisites: SPE155
Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
SPE290
Readings in Education
Significant literature/research chosen in consultation with the professor. Review and evaluation include colloquy with divisional faculty and/or written report.
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
SPE313
Characteristics/Methods of EarlyChildhood Special Education
Focus on strategies for developing culturally appropriate family professional partnerships to benefit children with special needs. Explores supporting family-centered approach. Includes a focus on family and professional rights and responsibilities in the special education process.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
SPE321
Reading and Writing Methods
Candidates address current theories and application of research-based effective reading strategies and writing instruction. The use of differentiated instructional methods provides candidates with alternative means of supporting students with disabilities in the processes of reading and writing.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Hours: 3.00
SPE325
Communication Disorders Characteristics and Strategies
This course examines theories of speech disorders in young children and how to use different strategies to help children learn. Literacy skills include intervention curricula, communication among cultures, problem solving techniques, role of language in learning, and supporting families in making decisions relating to their children's development and learning.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Hours: 3.00
SPE327
Assessment in Special Education
This course emphasizes a variety of assessments for special education children. Different instruments of assessing and procedures will be learned such as validity, reliability, bias, scoring, RTI, creating IEP's and IFSP's as wee as other performance based assessments to help children.
Pre-requisites: SPE105 & EDU201
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
SPE328
Exceptional Child
This course is a survey of the basic characteristics of children who have been determined to differ slightly from their peers in terms of mental, physical, and/or emotional characteristics. There will be a brief introduction to those educational programs and services collectively known as 'special education' in contemporary public and private schools. Attention is given to using information from an Individualized Education Program to create adaptations for learners with special needs. Meets teacher education requirements of PL 94-142 and HB 150.
Meets teacher education requirements of PL 94-142 and HB 150
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR PSY111H
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
SPE332
Characteristics and Methods of Intermed/Middle School Spec Ed
Candidates will learn methods and strategies for adapting classroom instruction to meet the needs of students with learning disabilities and/or cognitive impairments in the middle school setting and make informed instructional decisions based upon those needs.
Pre-requisites: SPE105 & EDU201
Hours: 3.00
SPE335
Characteristics and Methods of Secondary Special Education
This course explores topics surrounding characteristics and issues related to students with disabilities at the secondary level. Teaching strategies will address differentiating instruction in the areas of math, science, social studies and Language Arts.
Teacher Education program admission required.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
SPE340
Classroom Intervention
This course provides pre-candidate/candidates with a variety of classroom management styles and instructional strategies, including, RtI, PBIS, and best practice that are appropriate for those who intend to teach students with special needs. Pre-candidates/Candidates will combine theory and practice to make informed decisions when planning interventions. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
SPE342
Math/Science Methods for Elem, Middle and Secondary School
This course introduces methods of best practice for delivery and assessment of mathematical and science concepts to students with disabilities in the elementary/middle school setting.
Pre-requisites: EDU201
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
SPE490
Readings in Education
Significant literature/research chosen in consultation with the professor. Review and evaluation include colloquy with divisional faculty and/or written report.
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
Honors Undergraduate 2017-2018
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
ENG240H
Media Writing - Honors
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MUS224H
Intro to Mus Technology - Honors
Sum 3 Week, odd years Hours: 2.00
SPC330H
Speaking the Faith - Honors
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
Liberal Arts Undergraduate 2017-2018
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
BCM358
General Biochemistry I w/Lab
This is the first semester of a two semester course. Students are introduced to the major groups of biochemical molecules within the cell. Emphasis will be placed on protein structure and enzymatic regulation. Catabolic processes that lead to the generation of ATP, carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism will also be discussed. Lecture and Lab.
Pre-requisites: CHM257
Fall, even years Hours: 4.00
BCM471
General Biochemistry II w/Lab
This is the second semester of a two semester course. Emphasis will be placed on the structure and function of nucleic acids. Transcription, translation and the regulation of gene expression will be covered. Genomic databases and bioinformatics will be used to analyze features of the genome. Integration of biochemical concepts will be applied to the cellular processes of life. Lecture and Lab.
Pre-requisites: BCM358
Spring, odd years Hours: 4.00
BCM495
Biochemistry Practicum

Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Faculty consent required.
Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 6.00
BIO171
Principles of Biology w/Lab
(IAI L1900L) Common concepts underlying the biological sciences: cell structure, metabolism, cell and organismal reproduction, genetics, evolutionary theory. No dissection. Lecture and lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
BIO172
Prin of Organismal Biology w/Lab
An introduction to ecology, evolution, and the diversity of life. The course covers principles of interactions between organisms and their environments, taxonomic groups of organisms, including aspects of physiology, morphology, and relationships between taxa, and evolution. Dissection. Lecture and lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
BIO177
Environmental Science w/Lab
(IAI L1905L) Principles of the interactions of organisms with their environment, the alteration of the environment by humans, and the possible responses to global and national ecological problems. Lecture and lab. Offered as traditional course and online.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Varies Hours: 4.00
BIO272
Prin Human Anat/Physiol w/Lab
Integrated study of the human body and function of its systems. Not for SCM majors/minors or health science students.
Not for SCM majors/minors or health science students.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
BIO350
Ornithology w/Lab
Covers avian taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, communication, migration, conservation, extenction, and other important topics related to the natural history and ecology of birds. Lecture and lab.
NOTE: This course will include some mornings and Saturdays.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: BIO171 OR BIO177
Hours: 4.00
BIO370
Kinesiology
Fundamental movements of the body to determine actions and motions in physical activity and development of coordination.
Pre-requisites: BIO272 OR BIO374
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
BIO371
Microbiology w/Lab
Microorganisms including viruses, bacteria and protists, with an emphasis on pathogenic organisms. Lecture and lab.
Pre-requisites: BIO171 & CHM154
Spring, even years Hours: 5.00
BIO372
Cell Biology w/Lab
Cell structure and ultrastructure including cell physiology, metabolism and biochemistry. Lecture and Lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: BIO171 & CHM258
Fall, odd years Hours: 4.00
BIO373
Human Anat/Physiology I w/Lab
An integrated approach to the study of the human body and its functions including the skeletal, integumentary, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture and Lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: CHM154 & BIO172
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
BIO374
Human Anat/Physiology II w/Lab
A continued integrative approach to the study of the human body and its functions including the circulatory, digestive, urogenital, endocrine, reproductive, respiratory and immune systems. Lecture and Lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: BIO373
Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
BIO376
Evolutionary Theory/W Lab
Darwinian and neo-Darwinian theories of the origin and changes of organisms, including the relationship of these theories to the Christian faith. Lecture and lab.
Pre-requisites: CHM154 & BIO171
Fall, even years Hours: 4.00
BIO378
Human Genetics w/Lab
Genetic basis of inherited human traits including Mendelian inheritance, sex linkage, polygenic inheritance, and chromosomal anomalies. Lecture and Lab.
Pre-requisites: CHM154 & BIO171
Fall, even years Hours: 4.00
BIO379
Ecology w/Lab
Biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, how they interact at levels of organization from the organism to the biosphere, and how humans affect ecosystems. Patterns and processes that determine the abundance and distribution of organisms.
Pre-requisites: CHM154 & BIO171 OR BIO172 OR BIO177
Varies Hours: 4.00
BIO380
Genetic Analysis w/Lab
A study of the basic principles of heredity, including classical, cytological, population, and molecular genetics.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: BIO171 & CHM154
Fall, odd years Hours: 4.00
BIO480
Developmental Biology w/Lab
The course investigates the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development. Topics include fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, axis specification, morphogenesis, organogenesis, differential gene expression, and developmental mechanisms of evolutionary change. Bioethical implications of modern embryology will be considered through the lens of Christian worldview. This is a lab intensive course.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: BIO172 & BIO380
Spring, even years Hours: 5.00
BIO495
Biology Practicum

Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 6.00
BST101
Introduction to Old Testament
Provides a basic understanding of the Old Testament by study of the historical background, content, teaching and literary structure of the Old Testament books. Changed. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
BST102
Introduction to New Testament
Provides a basic understanding of the New Testament by examining the world of the New Testament and studying the contents, teaching and literary structure of the New Testament books. Fall, Spring & Summer Hours: 3.00
BST221
Interpreting the Bible
Examines both practical and theoretical aspects of biblical interpretation. Course goals include developing an exegetical method for interpreting texts from various literary genres, understanding the broad history of biblical interpretation (with an emphasis on historical-critical methods)and gaining skills and experience using major biblical reference sources. Students will write an exegetical paper on a biblical passage. Does not meet general education requirements.
NOTE: This course Does NOT meet the general educationBiblical and Theological Studies elective requirment.
Pre-requisites: BST101 & BST102
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
BST222
Pentateuch/Pre-Exilic Literature
A study of the first books of the Old Testament (Genesis through 2Kings). An analysis of the content, themes and message of these important pre-exilic writings. Special attention will be given to issues in this literature, e.g. Creation, the Fall, Ancestral Narratives, the Exodus, the Sinai Covenant, Deutronomistic Theology, Israel's political institutions, and the Davidic covenant.
Pre-requisites: BST101
Fall, On Demand Hours: 3.00
BST223
Life and Meaning of Jesus
Attempts to answer the question 'Who is Jesus?' by studying the words and works of Jesus as presented in the Gospels.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
BST224
Paul and His Epistles
Examines the life, legacy, and theology of Paul, especially through discussion of the New Testament letters attributed to him and the presentation of the apostle in Acts.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST245
Poetic and Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament
A study of the Old Testament poetic and wisdom books (e.g. Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Son of Solomon and Lamentations) as examples of the Hebrew poetic tradition. Books containing wisdom themes or narratives may also be considered. Special attention will be given to Hebrew parallelism, form critical analysis and the setting in Israel's worship and/or community life. Attention will be given to the ancient Near Eastern context of poetic and wisdom literature.
Pre-requisites: BST101
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST249
Prophetic Literature
A study of the content, themes, and message of the Canonical Prophets (Isaiah through Malachi). Special attention will be given to important issues in this literature, e.g., the nature of prophecy, the forms of prophetic literature, central aspects of the prophetic message (e.g., social justice, the significance of worship, the Exile and Return, the Day of the LORD, etc.), and the formation of prophetic books.
Pre-requisites: BST101
Fall, On Demand Hours: 3.00
BST263
Bible Book Study: John and Johannine Epistles
These courses are chiefly designed for general education students and are also appropriate for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement of intermediate secondary sources. Students will compare and contrast interpretative approaches to major issues in the biblical text and gain an overall understanding of the text.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST266
Bible Book Study: 1 and 2 Corinthians
These courses are chiefly designed for general education students and are also appropriate for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement of intermediate secondary sources. Students will compare and contrast interpretative approaches to major issues in the biblical text and gain an overall understanding of the text.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST269
Bible Book Study: Galatians and Philippians
These courses are chiefly designed for general education students and are also appropriate for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement of intermediate secondary sources. Students will compare and contrast interpretative approaches to major issues in the biblical text and gain an overall understanding of the text.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Hours: 3.00
BST273
Bible Book Study: Letters of James, Peter and Jude
These courses are chiefly designed for general education students and are also appropriate for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement of intermediate secondary sources. Students will compare and contrast interpretative approaches to major issues in the biblical text and gain an overall understanding of the text.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
BST279
Bible Book Study: Revelation
These courses are chiefly designed for general education students and are also appropriate for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement of intermediate secondary sources. Students will compare and contrast interpretative approaches to major issues in the biblical text and gain an overall understanding of the text.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST345
New Testament Greek I
Using the inductive method of study, the student is introduced to the basics of Greek syntax and begins very early in the course to do translation work in a specific New Testament book. Does not meet general education requirment.
NOTE: This course Does NOT meet the general educationBiblical and Theological Studies elective requirment.
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST346
New Testament Greek II
Continues the process begun in New Testament Greek I with a focus on improving translation skills and developing vocabulary. Meets general education requirement, but requires BST345.
Pre-requisites: BST345
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
BST347
New Testament Greek III
Offered on-line only.
Offered online only.
Pre-requisites: BST346
Summer, even years Hours: 3.00
BST348
Biblical Hebrew I
An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. The course will be continued in the second semester. Does not meet general education requirment. Does not meet general education requirement.
NOTE: This course Does NOT meet the general educationBiblical and Theological Studies elective requirment.
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
BST349
Biblical Hebrew II
An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. This course is a continuation of Biblical Hebrew I. Students will begin translating directly from the Hebrew Bible after the midpoint of the semester. Meets general education requirement, but requires BST348.
Pre-requisites: BST348
Faculty consent required.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST361
Bible Book Exegesis: Genesis
These courses are chiefly intended for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement with advanced secondary sources. Students will critically evaluate interpretive sources and approaches and argue for exegetical positions.
Pre-requisites: BST101
Spring, On Demand Hours: 3.00
BST365
Bible Book Exegesis: Psalms
These courses are chiefly intended for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement with advanced secondary sources. Students will critically evaluate interpretive sources and approaches and argue for exegetical positions.
Pre-requisites: BST101
Spring, On Demand Hours: 3.00
BST368
Bible Book Exegesis: Isaiah
These courses are chiefly intended for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement with advanced secondary sources. Students will critically evaluate interpretive sources and approaches and argue for exegetical positions.
Pre-requisites: BST101
Spring, On Demand Hours: 3.00
BST369
Bible Book Exegesis: Jeremiah
These courses are chiefly intended for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement with advanced secondary sources. Students will critically evaluate interpretive sources and approaches and argue for exegetical positions.
Pre-requisites: BST101
Spring, On Demand Hours: 3.00
BST371
Bible Book Exegesis: Luke
These courses are chiefly intended for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement with advanced secondary sources. Students will critically evaluate interpretive sources and approaches and argue for exegetical positions.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
BST374
Bible Book Exegesis: Romans
These courses are chiefly intended for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement with advanced secondary sources. Students will critically evaluate interpretive sources and approaches and argue for exegetical positions.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
BST376
Bible Book Exegesis: Hebrews
These courses are chiefly intended for majors in BST and related disciplines. The courses focus primarily on the stated biblical text with important engagement with advanced secondary sources. Students will critically evaluate interpretive sources and approaches and argue for exegetical positions.
Pre-requisites: BST102
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST449
History, Cultures and Literatureof the New Testament World
This course provides a survey of various aspects of the world of Second Temple Judaism and early Christianity, with the goal of helping students better understand the broad contextsJewish, Greek, and Romanin which Christianity developed. Topics for examination include the history and cultures (social, religious, philosophical) of Second Temple Judaism and the Greek and Roman empires as well as major texts from Second Temple Judaism (including the Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, and Philo). Does not meet general education requirement.
Pre-requisites: BST101 & BST102
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
BST485X
Research Seminar
This course is the senior capstone for students with majors in the Biblical and Theological Studies department. Building upon the advanced research, writing and revising skills gained throughout the program, students will undertake research and under faculty supervision produce a thesis of between 10,000 and 12,000 words which offers a sustained and constructive response to an issue(s) raised within the field of biblical or theological studies. Students will present and defend their research conclusions to a group of their peers and other faculty.
Cross-lsited as THS485X
On demand Hours: 3.00
CHM150
Chemistry for Poets w/Lab
A study of the chemistry of everyday life for those with little or no background in science and mathematics. Includes petroleum products, plastics, fabrics, food additives, agrichemistry, pharmaceuticals, cleaning products, and nuclear chemistry. Lecture and Lab.
Not applicable on SCM major
Varies Hours: 4.00
CHM153
General Chemistry I w/Lab
An exploration into the structure and interactions of matter. Appropriate for SCM majors, pre-medical, pre-physician assistant, pre-dental, pre-physical therapy, pre-veterinary and pre-engineering students and Physical Science Education students. Lecture and Lab.
2 years of high school chemistry, a Math ACT score of 22 or higher, or MAT211 as a co-req. Instructor may override prereqs.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
CHM154
General Chemistry II w/Lab
An exploration into the structure and interactions of matter. Appropriate for SM majors, pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-nursing, and pre-engineering students and Physical Science Education students. Lecture and Lab.
Instructor may override prereqs
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: CHM153
Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
CHM255
Analytical Chemistry w/Lab
The theory and practice of the analysis of inorganic, organic, and biochemical samples including classical and modern approaches. Lecture and Lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: CHM154 OR CHM154H
Spring, even years Hours: 5.00
CHM257
Organic Chemistry I w/Lab
A detailed study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds, including reaction mechanisms, energy considerations and applications of molecular spectroscopy. Lecture and Lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: CHM154 OR CHM154H
Fall, odd years Hours: 5.00
CHM258
Organic Chemistry II w/Lab
A detailed study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds, including reaction mechanisms, energy considerations and applications of molecular spectroscopy. Lecture and Lab. Next offered Spring 2006
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: CHM257
Spring, even years Hours: 5.00
CHM355
Physical Chemistry I
The physical and mathematical basis for the laws, hypotheses, and theories underlying chemistry.
Pre-requisites: CHM154 & MAT216 & PHY238
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
CHM356
Physical Chemistry II
The physical and mathematical basis for the laws, hypotheses and theories underlying chemistry.
Pre-requisites: CHM355
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
CJM110
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Surveys and analyzes the criminal justice system from a macro perspective. It includes historical and philosophical overview of its development, with special emphasis on the system's components and the relationship among those components in the administration of criminal justice in America. Hours: 3.00
CJM111
Intro to Criminal Investigation
Examines the techniques and problems involved in investigation of criminal cases. Course includes theory and techniques of investigation, the questioning of witnesses and suspects, procedural problems involved in investigation, the collection and presentation of evidence, and preparation of cases. Hours: 3.00
CJM210
Criminal Law and Procedure
Examines the components, purposes and functions of criminal law. Included in this course is a study of criminal liability, including the elements of various offenses and the rules of evidence area. Hours: 3.00
CJM211
Juvenile Delinquency
Covers the history and philosophies of society's reactions to juvenile behavior and problems. The course incorporates the theories of delinquency and causation theories of juvenile criminality. Interaction among the police, judiciary, and corrections are examined in the context of cultural influences. Juvenile law and procedures are examined in this course. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
CJM212
Introduction to Criminology
Examines criminological theory and process. It focuses on causation theories of criminality. A thorough study is made of the nature of crime, types of crimes, the criminal process and explanations for criminal behavior including discussion of biosocial, psychological, and sociological theories. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
CJM383
Law Enfrcmt Ethics and Morality
Studies the ethical background and decision-making steps that are present in value-laden situations, with particular emphasis on Christian principles for personal and social responsibility as applied to management and leadership. Situational considerations dealing with racial profiling, gratuities and political climates will be explored. Hours: 3.00
COM220
Intro to Study of Communication
This survey course presents the historical roots, methodological groundings, and present state of the field of communication. The student is introduced to the communication field's specialized vocabulary, fundamental works, and historical theorists. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
COM293
Communication Arts Conference
Structured as a two-day academic conference held near the end of each semester, the Communication Arts Conference requires students to critically engage with their discipline and with one another. Through individual presentations drawn from classroom experience and through open discussion, students will hone their skills as speakers and thinkers. In addition, the Communication Arts Conference helps students to reflect upon their own work and build community with peers and faculty members. Minimum Hours: 0.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
COM311
Language and Society
Surveys verbal and nonverbal elements of communication; and considers how language is used by individuals, governments, the entertainment world and commerce for the purpose of socialization, information and persuasion. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
COM314
Intercultural Communication
This course introduces students to the process and study of communication between different cultures from the standpoint of English speaking United States citizens. Special attention is given to the communication practices of various ethnic groups in the hopes of facilitating effective communication between cultures. Various communication styles from cultures within the American experience are also examined. Different theoretical models of intercultural communication are studied. Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
COM442
Communication Theory/Application
Findings by communications theorists and researchers are related to the communication process and applied to practice of effective communication.
Instructor may override prereq
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
COM443
Communication Ethics
Examines communication ethics at both a personal and organizational level in light of real world application. Enables the student to understand the range of ethical standards in practice, to compare and contrast classic and contemporary application of ethical standards, and to develop a personal and organizational standard of ethics. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
COM495
Senior Internship
Students are employed on a part or full time basis with a media organization or some other organization in which communication skills are required.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
COM499
Senior Research Project
Provides opportunity for senior students to develop a 10,000 word research project in their focal area. Students will hone their research and writing skills by brainstorming ideas, developing a bibliography, meeting individually with the professor, drafting and presenting material, writing the finished project, and presenting their results to the Communication Arts conference at the end of the semester. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG098
Developmental Composition
Required of all students who need to learn or develop basic skills in grammar as well as sentence and paragraph development in order to write on a college level. The course is not applicable to graduation core requirements or the major. A Grade of C- or below requires the course be repeated.
Grade of C- or below requires the course to be repeated. Not applicable to graduation core requirements or the major
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG101
Expository Writing
(IAI C1900) Exploration and practice of expository writing with an emphasis on grammar and mechanics, essay organization and idea development. Students will be expected to think critically and analytically about their ideas and the ideas of others, and to write about the impact or influence of others' ideas on their own views. Activities and assignments will provide opportunities for original and analytical writing, as well as engaging the writing students are doing in other classes. Not applicable to CA majors. A Grade of C- or below requires the course be repeated.
PRQ ENG098 or ACT English score of 19-22 Grade of C- or below requires the course be repeated Not applicable to COM majors
Pre-requisites: ACT 19 OR SAT 460 OR ENG098 OR E098 1
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG102
Critical Thinking and Writing
(IAI C1900R) Students will continue to develop their research, thinking and writing skills through wide-ranging readings, class discussion, vocabulary work and a number of intermediate-length papers requiring formal documentation. A Grade of C- or below requires the course be repeated.
PRQ ENG101 or ACT English score of 23-26. Grade of C- or below requires the course be repeated. Not applicable to COM majors
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG210
Advanced Essay Writing
Students become familiar with the tradition and practice of the English essay in a variety of situations. Work includes analysis of essays, discussion of prominent ideas, and writing to express opinion and interact with an audience through an organic approach to form.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG211
Non-Fiction Prose
Students explore the nature of research-based writing and practice it through unusual writing exercises to test style and voice boundaries, and through the process development of a research-based essay.
PRQ ENG102 or ACT English score of 27 or over
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG240
Media Writing
Students learn to gather, produce and evaluate hard news, sports, editorials, commentary and special features for print and electronic media.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG240H
Media Writing - Honors
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG261
Children's Literature
Fundamental literary and visual elements of children's literature are applied to selected works as tools for evaluation and analysis. Students will become familiar with evaluation criteria for children's literature and be able to demonstrate their understanding through presentations and projects. The course is designed for students preparing to teach grades K-8, with some attention to pre-K.
Registration preference will be given to Education majors.
Co-requisites: EDU131
Pre-requisites: EDU131 OR COM311 OR ENG360
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG262
Eminent British Writers
A survey of noteworthy and notable British writers - novelists, dramatists and poets - with special attention to the political, social and religious implications and influences of each work.
Does not meet Gen. Ed. Literature requirement
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG263
American Literature Since 1865
A survey of the American literary scene since 1865, including an array of representative novelists, dramatists and poets.
Note: ENG263 does not meet general education literature requirement.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG264
Adolescent Literature
The course covers a diverse selection of adolescent literature. Students will practice literary analysis, will apply evaluation criteria to each work to assess if and how the text might be used in the classroom, and will investigate critical issues such as censorship. The course is designed for students preparing to teach in middle and/or high school.
Preference will be given to Education Majors
Pre-requisites: EDU131 OR COM311 OR ENG360
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG266
The Inklings
This course will provide the student with an opportunity to read some of the central texts of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams, discuss issues relating to the themes, motifs and techniques of the authors, and produce a series of essays that analyze the texts and offer insights and perspectives on them. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG268
African-American Literature
A critical study of the representative works of the African-American literary canon, this course examines its major genres and historical movements, shedding light upon the collective experience of the African diaspora in America.
ENG268 does not meet the general education literature requirement.
Prereq: ENG102 or higher.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG310
History and Structure of English
A survey of the history of the English language from the Anglo-Saxons to the present, as well as grammatical analysis from traditional, structuralist and transformational-generative perspectives.
This course does NOT meet the general education upper division literature requirement.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG312
Literary Theory and Criticism
(IAI H3 900) Surveys literary aesthetics and contemporary theories of reading literature. Through the analysis of selected works of literature, the student develops well-informed standards of criticism. This course does not satisfy the upper level English literature general education requirement. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG357
Creative Writing
Writing in a variety of literary forms with an emphasis on the craft of writing.
Completion of general education writing requirements.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG360
Archetypes of Western Literature
Recurrent character types, images, and plot patterns are studied in foundational works epitomizing the western tradition. Authors include Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, Blake, Dostoevsky, Woolf, and Faulkner.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ENG361
Hero and Anti-Hero
Examines heroism alternately as a transcendent idea and culturally-defined concept. The evolution of the hero, villain, and anti-hero is charted throughout history in the works of authors such as Homer, Malory, Shakespeare, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Crane, Hemingway, Camus, Mishima and Tillich.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG362
Man and Woman
Courtship and love as forces which can either exalt or degrade the human spirit are seen as manifested in works of authors such as Virgil, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Barrett-Browning, de Laclos, Dreiser, and Robbe-Grillet.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG363
Prophetic Comedy
The ability of society to laugh at its own flaws and pretensions is reflected in the satirical writings of writers which may include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Moliere, Voltaire, Swift, Dickens, Shaw, Lewis and Vonnegut.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG364
Non-Western Literature
For years it has been the contention of scholars and critics alike that one of the best ways to learn about and understand a culture is to study its literature. Although it is an impossible task to learn the non-western world in one semester, we will explore representative novels, poetry, and short fiction from each major region of the world. We will also engage recent developments in globalization, including the shift of Christianity to the global south and east.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG365X
Plays That Shaped Western World
In this 12-week course, students will be exposed to drama writtten from the Greek era through the 20th century. They will learn how the playwrights changed our culture and society through their works. They will formulate their opinions and views of the plays through various papers and projects.
Cross-listed with THE365X.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Fall, Spring & Summer Hours: 3.00
ENG366
Poetry
A critical study of representative poetical works of European and American Literature with optional texts from other regions of the world. Equips the student for deeper level reading and response to poetry. Active dialog in class on assigned readings and a progressive sequence of writing assignments intended to develop critical thinking and interpretive skills.
Prereq: ENG102 or higher.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG367
The Novel
An exploration of different novels, from the classical to the cutting edge. Featured authors may include Cervantes, Defoe, Dostosvsky, Eliot, Goethe, Dickens, James, Woolf, or Jackson. The course will also trace the history and theory of the novel. Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG370
Literature and Spirituality
A critical study of selected classics of spirituality, this course focuses on the works of a range of distinguished history makers from the Pre-Christian to the Modern era. The Vedic texts, St. Augustine, Boethius, Medieval women mystics, Aquinas, Pascal, John Bunyan, Shakespeare, John Donne, and Madam Guyon make up the major portion of the readings. Additional titles provided, depending on individual needs or interest.
Prereq: ENG102 or higher.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG371
Nature Literature
Mankind's relationship with nature and human investigation of and speculation about the natural process are viewed through works of writers such as Faulkner, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Edwards, Muir, Leopold; Quammen, and Phillip K Dick.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG372
Faith and Doubt
Explores the human struggle to know and relate to God through Christ in a variety of literary texts (and at least one film). Authors include Augustine, Dante, Shakespeare, Milton, Bunyan, Hawthorne, C.S. Lewis, James Baldwin, Frederick Buechner, and others.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG373
Light in Darkness
The effort of man to turn catastrophe into a triumph of the human spirit is reflected in the tragic insight of writers which may include Aeschylus, Shakespeare, Tolstoy, Jacobs, Wiesel, and the book of Job.
Instructor may override prereqs
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ENG393
Literary Studies Seminar
The seminar provides in-depth study of a particular area of literary studies ranging from Renaissance drama to major Russian authors, from the American novel to the work of Charles Dickens (the topical focus of the course will change each time the course if offered). The course is designed to immerse students in an environment of specialized study that develops deep focus research skills and interpretive abilities. This course does not meet the general education upper division literature requirement.
This course does NOT meet the general education upper division literature requirement.
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
ENG442
Screenwriting for TV and Film
This class will examine the many facets of writing for film and television. Attention will be paid to both the long and short form script. Students will learn what makes up a good screenplay, including characterization, beats, scenes, acts, and dialogue. Each student will complete a major writing project.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Sum 3 Week:3 Year Cycle Hours: 3.00
ENG465X
Shakespeare: Plays and Performance
The course will implement traditional and contemporary theories used in the study of Shakespeare to develop the broadest and deepest sense of the large body of his work. Through an examination of Shakespeare's life and times, the course will enable an understanding of his significance to drama, literature, and thought reaching far beyond his life and times. In that vein, this course will address Harold Bloom's bold contention that Shakespeare invented the basic ideas that we now use to define ourselves as human beings. This course does not meet the general education upper division literature requirement.
Cross-listed with THE465X
This course does NOT meet the general education upper division literature requirement.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ESS101
Wellness
Focuses on the dimensions of wellness, which include physical, spiritual, emotional, social and intellectual. An emphasis will be on awareness, understanding and a conscious effort to develop and balance each of these dimensions. Topics such as stress management, nutrition, alcohol and substance abuse will be covered. Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS105
Self Defense
This course provides basic self-defense techniques and teaches modern dangers and threats that people may face. In addition to physical preparedness this course offers information on dating violence, Title 9 information and threat assessment skills. Hours: 1.00
ESS110
Community First Aid and Safety
Provides the knowledge and practical experience of care for breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, infants and children, first aid for burns, bleeding, shock, poisoning, and heat and cold emergencies. American Red Cross certification is available. Does not meet general education requirement.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
IMPORTANT: Please do not register for this class if you have a CPRcard. Instead, contact Dr. Headley to set up a Challenge Exam toreceive credit for the course.
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS112
Golf
The sport of golf is a lifelong activity enjoyed by all ages. The student's enjoyment of golf will be enhanced by a complete understanding of the rules and etiquette that govern play, the techniques of the sport and the execution of the skills. This course offers instruction, drill work and use of a golf course.
Offered first half of semester only
Sports Science Fee: $20.00.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS115
Aerobics
An aerobic workout using a variety of activities including high-low combinations and step aerobics. Students will learn to recognize and design a safe and effective workout and to monitor and modify intensity. Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS117
Racquet Sports
This course is designed to provide knowledge and skill development in racquetball and badminton as a liftetime activity. Offered spring semester only. Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS119
Tennis
This course offers instruction on rules, proper tennis etiquette, basic fundamentals, and overall strategy to enjoy the game of tennis.
Meets first half of fall semester only
Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS130
Weight Lifting
A physical fitness course providing instruction in safe and sensible weight training techniques with emphasis on individual needs and appropriate progressions. Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS132
Personal Fitness Training
Exercises designed specifically for improving cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength and endurance. A variety of exercises will be used. Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS140
Outdoor Recreation
This is an in-depth study of recreational camping/outdoor knowledge and skills. This course is designed to teach theory and techniques for camping and outdoor adventure. Hands on experience and practical application will be covered through course instruction and a camp outing. Students will learn to work with diversity of people, ages, skill levels, and special populations.
Sports Science Fee: $20.00.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
Every Summer 3 Week Term Hours: 1.00
ESS148
Rhythmic Activities
This class will emphasize the knowledge necessary to develop and maintain rhythmic activities and as a lifestyle activity for the future. Dances such as square dance, ballroom, social and cultural dances and design will be addressed. A typical class will consist of a short lecture followed by a dance session. This course meets requirements for teaching rhythmic activities for elementary and secondary schools. Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS150
Intercollegiate Participation
Available for intercollegiate varsity and JV participants on a pass/fail basis for a maximum of two credit hours. Able to register if completed one season. This course does not fulfill the gen ed activity course requirement.
ESS150 does NOT fulfill the gen ed activity course requirement.
IMPORTANT: Please contact Prof Ensign to do a course authorizationto register for this course. ESS150 does not meet gen edrequirements, but can be registered for in two semesters for a totalof two hours of elective credit.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS195
Exercise/Sport Science Practicum
Provides one credit hour for pre-arranged practicum experience.end
Approval of ESS department chair the semester prior to the credit being received.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS210
Life Guarding
A study of lifesaving and water-safety skills presenting practical methods for students to use in emergency situations. Also teaches them to avoid hazardous conditions and practices. Course is taken at the Elgin Center. This course does not meet the general education requirment.
Course taken at the Elgin Centre ESS chair permission required. Dates and evening TBA.A fee of $60.00 will be paid to Elgin Centre.
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS241
Principles of Health
Covers principles of health, effects of drugs and stimulants, principles of sanitation, sex education, and personal health.
Pre-requisites: ESS101
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS242
Foundations of Health, Phys Ed, Recreation and Sport (HPERS)
An introduction to health, physical education, recreation and sport including objectives, history, philosophy, professional organizations and relationship to Christian commitment to the field. Final
First third of semester
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS244
Environmental Health and Safety
To provide students with an understanding of man's impact on the environment and how those impacts can be controlled or mitigated. Students completing this course should be able to recognize environmental problems and understand control and preventative measures and initiatives to teach their students.
Pre-requisites: ESS101
Fall, odd years Hours: 2.00
ESS245
Community Health
Theory and techniques of community organization as applied to planning, implementing and evaluating community health problems and measures of control. Emphasis on principles, objectives and methods of community health planning. Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
ESS251
Motor Development and Learning
Studies growth and development patterns of motor learning principles in the acquisition of simple and complex movement. Practical experience in skill analysis and skill progression in a laboratory setting.
Second two-thirds of semester.
Every Semester Hours: 2.00
ESS252
Theory/Techniques of Team Sports
Provides instruction and practice in the teaching of basic motor skills related to team sports and includes the study of rules and required equipment. Every Fall Semester Hours: 2.00
ESS253
Theory and Tech of Indiv Sports
Provides instruction and practice in the teaching of basic motor skills related to individual sports and includes the study of rules and required equipment. Every Fall Semester Hours: 2.00
ESS255
Principles of Coaching
Studies the coach's role in the application of selected concepts and principles from psychology, sociology, and physiology related to motivation, training and conditioning methods. Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
ESS261
Coaching Volleyball Technical and Tactical Skills
This class provides knowledge on the importance of technical and tactical skills of the sport of Volleyball leading to preparing players for game day; tactical skills necessary for team success; detect and correct errors in athletic performance and transfer knowledge and ability gained in practices to execution in games. Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS262
Coaching Your Own Technical and Tactical Skills
This class provides knowledge on the importance of technical and tactical skills of the sport of Football leading to preparing players for game day; tactical skills necessary for team success; detect and correct errors in athletic performance and transfer knowledge and ability gained in practices to execution in games. Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS263
Coaching Baseball Technical and Tactical Skills
This class provides knowledge on the importance of technical and tactical skills of the sport of Baseball leading to preparing players for game day; tactical skills necessary for team success; detect and correct errors in athletic performance and transfer knowledge and ability gained in practices to execution in games. Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS264
Coaching Basketball Technical and Tactical Skills
This class provides knowledge on the importance of technical and tactical skills of the sport of Basketball leading to preparing players for game day; tactical skills necessary for team success; detect and correct errors in athletic performance and transfer knowledge and ability gained in practices to execution in games. Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
ESS295
Sport Ministry Practicum
Participate in a short-term cross-cultural/international sport ministry experience.
The sponsoring organization must be approved by the ESS department chair.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS340
Methods of Elementary PE
Studies the elementary physical education program and its value to a child's education. Included are appropriate games, sports and rhythmical activities plus basic training for the physical education specialist.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: ESS253 & ESS252 & ESS251 & ESS242
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS341
Methods/Matls of Teaching PE
Covers principles underlying curriculum, planning of lessons and units, the teaching process, classroom management, materials of instruction and the use of audio/visual aids.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: ESS242 & ESS251 & ESS252 & ESS253
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS350
Organization and Admin of Sport
A study of facilities, equipment, budgeting, program planning, organization and legal issues in exercise-related professions. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS351
Sport Finance and Fundraising
This course examines the financial tools that sports managers use to run their sport and health fitness related businesses. As such, it explores traditional and innovative methods of revenue acquisition and financial management in sports organizations, the financial business structure of sports organizations , and the financial planning and forecasting processes that make organizations effective, as well as foundations, fundraising methods and volunteering. Various other aspects of finance are discussed as they relate to sports organizations, including the time value of money, capital structuring, stocks and bonds,inventory management, and taxation. The operations of minor league sports organizations and fitness centers are also examined.
Pre-requisites: BUS102
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
ESS352
Sports Marketing
This class will discuss and synthesize the application of the principles of promotion and marketing to the sport and fitness industry including the area of professional sports, corporate fitness, college/high school athletics, clubs and resorts.
Pre-requisites: BUS101
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
ESS353
Basic Athletic Train/First Aid
Combines American Red Cross first aid practices with emphasis on injuries in athletics, rehabilitation of athletes, and practical knowledge of taping in a laboratory setting. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS372
Health Nutrition
An in-depth study of nutritional concepts, nutrition-related health conditions, sources of nutritional information, and dietary requirements for a variety of populations.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ESS375X
Health Aspects/Chem Dependency
Focuses on the major categories of psychoactive drugs and their use/abuse. It surveys substance abuse and dependence and the addiction process. It examines models of treatment and prevention based on major theories of addiction and the relationship of addiction to physical, mental, relational, and spiritual health.
Cross-listed as PSY375X
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
ESS378
Sport Psychology
An overview of psychological theory and research as it relates to sport and exercise at the individual and group levels.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS395
ESS Practicum II
Students utilize skills acquired through Exercise and Sport Science courses in sport- and health and wellness-related environments shadowing a director/mentor. Every Fall and Spring Hours: 1.00
ESS441
Curriculum Development in PE
Reviews the scope and sequence of the physical education curriculum for grades K-12 including history and principles underlying organization, and management and evaluation of effective physical education programs, including adaptation, work with exceptional children, multicultural approaches and classroom management. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS447
Adapted Physical Education
Course enables students to identify normal and abnormal growth patterns, administer tests and scales for growth measurement, develop activities for those requiring special programs, and individualize physical education for exceptional children (including those with developmental and learning disabilities), multicultural children and youth. Satisfies requirements of PL 94-142 and HB 150 when PSY 222 and 223 have been taken. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS450
Physical Activity Assessment andMeasurement
Selection, construction and interpretation of tests and measurements related to physical activity instruction (for Physical Education and fitness testing) including basic statistical techniques for evaluation of tests.
Pre-requisites: BIO272 OR BIO373
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
ESS460
Health Education and Promotion
Reviews scope and sequence of health behavior as a contributor to current public health problems and the role of health education and health promotion programs in addressing them, drawing examples from community- based health education, patient education, school health, and worksite health promotion, including history, principles management and evaluation of effective health education and promotion programs, including adaptation, multicultural approaches, classroom management.
Pre-requisites: ESS245
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
ESS467
Physiology of Exercise
Studies human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the muscular, circulatory, nervous, digestive and respiratory systems. Stress is placed on the effects of exercise on those systems.
Pre-requisites: BIO272 OR BIO373
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ESS475
Sport Law and Ethics
An in-depth study of the legal responsibilities of persons functioning in the fields of recreation/leisure and exercise/fitness science. It will include both application and interpretation of the law. Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
ESS480
Senior Sports Management Seminar
A capstone course discussing issues related specifically to the sport industry. Such topics include: sales, human resources, facility management, fund-raising, career opportunities, ethics, Title IX, current events and strategies. Every Semester Hours: 2.00
ESS495
ESS Internship
Students utilize skills acquired through sport management courses in sport-related environments with director supervision. The internship is a full-time (40 hours/week) work experience for a minimum of 400 clock hours. It is the responsibility of the student to secure appropriate internship employment.
Requirements: Senior classification and 2.5 GPA within major. Must be approved by internship director the semester prior to registration. Available for 6-12 credit hours.
Requirements: Senior classification and 2.5 GPA within major. Mustbe approved by internship director the semester PRIOR toregistration. Available for 6-12 credit hours. Register only ifrequirements are met.
Faculty consent required.
Fall, Spring & Summer Hours: 12.00
ESS496
Sports Ministry Internship
Participate in sport ministry leadership experience at a camp, church or parachurch setting.
Applications must be submitted and approved prior to registration. Minimum of 200 hours. 2.5 GPA required.
Hours: 6.00
GEN098
Seminar for Academic Success
This course focuses on developing skills and strategies for academic success at Judson University. This course is open to all students but is required for students who are on academic warning and probation. The course will discuss the necessary steps to ensure that all students have access to both academic and support services to maintain or regain good academic standing. The course is not applicable to graduation core requirements or the major
The course is not applicable to graduation core requirements or the major.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 1.00
GEN101
Questions of Life: Entering the Judson Conversation
Questions of Life introduces students to the Christian liberal arts tradition that is the foundation for a Judson University education. Students will examine the question of the psalmist, 'what are human beings that you are mindful of them, mortals that you care for them?' (Psalm 8:4 NRSV). Students will trace the contours of what it means to be human from four perspectives: 1) love (between marital spouses, children and parents, and God and humanity); 2) suffering (the role of struggle); 3) community (the interdependence between people, God and humanity, and humanity and the non-human creation); and 4) the good life (the pursuit of a world of justice and peace). Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
GEN201
Peer Tutoring Workshop General Studies
To prepare tutors to function effectively in one-to-one and group tutoring situations. Peer tutors only. May be taken for credit twice. Hours: 1.00
GEN203
Peer Leadership Development
Developing peer leaders on campus who will create a personal leadership framework out of which they will lead. In developing this framework, students will interpret, engage, demonstrate and implement leadership skills that relate to the whole person.
First 1/3 of the semester
Hours: 1.00
GEN301
Reflecting on the Conversation
This class builds on GEN101 and prepares the student for GEN401. Drawing on their entire Judson experience students will reflect and articulate how that experience (major, general education, faith formation, co-curricular activities, etc.) is shaping them as whole persons. Through guided discussion and assignments, students will envision and articulate how the Judson experience will affect how they shape their world.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Annually Hours: 1.00
GEN401
The Good Life: Continuing the Conversation
This course aims to help students draw together the various strands of their educational experience as they continue to explore the 'good life' they will pursue upon graduation. In this liberal arts capstone for the Judson undergraduate experience students will continue the 'good life' conversation by drawing upon their developing understanding of who they are and their place in world, their faith commitments, their disciplinary expertise, and their broader liberal arts awareness. The course will help students articulate a personal vision for a 'good life' that is both local and global in scope. Building from a closer examination of the Christian faith and their own vocation within wider culture, students will work together in creative research and problem solving as they offer helpful suggestions for addressing issues of global and local concern both to Christians and humanity as a whole. Prerequisite of junior status and GEN301 or substitute approved by GEC.
Prerequisite of junior status and GEN301 or substitute approved by GEC.
Prerequisite if you started Judson prior to fall 16 you must be atsenior standing when the course begins. If you started Judson fall 16 orafter you must be at junior/senior standing when the course begins andhave passed GEN301 or a substitute approved by GEC.
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
HIS171
Rise of U.S. Until 1877
(IAI S2900) Covers the political, economic, and social development from colonial beginnings to the end of Reconstruction; growth of political institutions; foreign affairs; and people, ideas, and forces which shaped American traditions.
Satisfies State of Illinois requirement for teacher education
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
HIS172
Rise of U.S. Since 1877
(IAI S2901) Covers the social, political, and cultural events and ideas contributing to the industrial growth, political reform movements, governmental control, welfare state, and the dilemma of world leadership.
Satisfies State of Illinois requirement for teacher education
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
HIS261
History of Civilization I
(IAI S2912N) Covers the social, political, and cultural events and ideas contributing to the development of Western and non-Western nations up to the 16th century.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
HIS262
History of Civilization II
(IAI S2913N) Continues the study of Western and non-Western cultures from the 16th century through the contemporary era.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
HIS320X
History of Christianity to 1500
This examines the history of Christianity from the end of the New Testament to the beginnings of the Reformation. It was during this time that Christianity was the social, intellectual, political, economic and cultural engine of the Western world. The course will explore popular beliefs and how Christianity interacted with other cultural developments. Students will familiarize themselves with such events and trends as the formation of the biblical canon, the controversies surrounding the early councils, monasticism, scholasticism, and the rise the Papacy.
Cross listed as THS320X
Hours: 3.00
HIS321X
The Church and the Reformation
Reviews institutional expressions of the Christian faith; development of medieval forms; causes of the Reformation; and review of German, Swiss, English, Radical, and Catholic Reformations.
Cross-listed as THS321X.
Hours: 3.00
HIS363
Medieval Europe
This course will cover Western Europe between the 5th and 15th century, focusing on the religious, cultural, and intellectual developments in the second half of this period. Topics will include, but not be limited to, courtly and military culture, religious trends, the development of new forms of thought and literature, and the relationship between Europeans and their neighbors.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 3 OR SAT 540
On demand Hours: 3.00
HIS364
The Classical Mediterranean
Reviews Egypt's twenty-six dynasties, early Semitic civilizations, the great empires in the fertile crescent, rise of the Greeks, and Alexander's conquest.
Instructor may override co-req.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
On demand Hours: 3.00
HIS365
World in Revolution
Reviews the rise of independence movements in colonial lands since 1900, analyzes of contemporary Third World values and attitudes; clash of cultures, religions, ideologies; and trends in political realities.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
HIS366
Nationalism and Globalization
Explores the changing world order after the end of the Cold War with specific attention to the impact of globalization on nationalism and nation-states, including such issues as how different nation-states have responded to the challenges of globalization and the problems and prospects of the nexus of globalization and nationalism in the twenty-first century.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
HIS367
Mod Imperial:18th Cent to Pres
Deals with the rise of European domination in world affairs; development of colonialism; rationale, methods, and economics of colonial expansion; cultural, political and commercial controls; the grand vision of European empire; and the disenchantment.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Hours: 3.00
HIS375
City and Suburb in American Hist
This course traces the evolution of American cities and their surrounding suburbs. It explores why and how American cities have grown, and how Americans have lived their lives, organized their public and private spaces, governed themselves, and shaped their built environments in urban and suburban areas. The course will pay particular attention to the history of Chicago as a case study. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
HIS376
Minority Experience in America
Reviews immigration to America, ethnic contributions to American society, urban life and politics, race issues in national politics, cultural contributions of minorities, and cross-cultural trends. Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
HIS377
Recent Amer: The U.S. Since 1945
Explores the postwar history of the U.S.; the impact of World War II and the Cold War on American society and politics; cultural and social trends; national political and policy issues; and the effects of economic boom and stagnation. The course pays special attention to social and political transformations during the era of the 1960s. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
HIS378
Amer Foreign Relation Since 1898
Traces the increasing involvement of the United States in foreign affairs from an earlier posture of political isolationism to the more recent commitment of leadership among the nations of the world. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
HIS380
History Methods: U.S.
A seminar in which students will be introduced to major issues in, and approaches to, the reading, studying, and dissemination of history, including the role of faith commitments in historical scholarship. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
HIS381
History Methods: World
A seminar in which students will be introduced to major issues in, and approaches to, the reading, studying, and dissemination of history, including the role of faith commitments in historical scholarship. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
HIS391
History and Culture of China
This course will provide a chronological and thematic introduction to Chinese history from the beginning of the civilization to contemporary period while the major elements of traditional Chinese culture will be presented through lectures, films and projects. Emphasis will be given to those forms of religions common to both 'elite' and 'popular' cultures and gender and other social issues will be discussed in general.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Hours: 3.00
HIS392
History and Culture of Japan
This course will introduce the land and people of Japan beginning with its prehistoric culture and the introduction of Chinese civilization, and continue with an examination of feudal and modern Japan. While the intent of the course is to provide students with a profound understanding of the foundations of Japanese culture, other significant issues such as the formation of Japanese government and society in the early modern era will also be addressed.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Hours: 3.00
HIS393
History and Culture in Southeast Asia
This course is designed to provide a general introduction to the history and culture of the region called Southeast Asia: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. The course analyzes broad themes which encompass major changes in the region and is organized chronologically around three broad periods: traditional states and societies; colonial domination and transformation; and independence and new nation states.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
HIS394
Modern Latin America
Explores the history of Latin America since independence, including varied national and regional experiences; cooperation and competition; major themes in political, social and economic development; and relations with the United States and the world.
Pre-requisites: ENG101 OR ACT 23 OR SAT 540
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
HIS484
Historical Research and Writing
A seminar in which students will study the practice of historical research and writing, conduct their own primary and secondary research and produce a high quality primary research project. Required for History and Secondary Education-History majors.
Please contact the instructor to do a course authorizaiton to allow you to register for this course.
Please contact Dr Kaplowitz at, ckaplowitz@judsonu.edu, about planningto take HIS484.
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
HIS495
History Practicum
Provides 1-3 credits appropriate to class level for pre-arranged internship experiences.
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
MAT081
Pre-Algebra
For students who need a review of fundamental mathematics before entering Algebra. Algebraic concepts are introduced an extension of previously acquired skills. Topics include arithmetic operations, solving equations, and working with inverses, ratios, and proportions.
Cross-taught with MAT098. Standard calculator is TI-84The course is not applicable to graduation core requirements or the major.
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
MAT098
Algebra
A review of algebraic concepts and methods for students with little exposure to algebra. Topics include the concepts of polynomials, factoring, solving equations and word problems, rational expressions, linear and quadratic functions, exponents and radicals.
Cross-taught with MAT081. Not applicable to graduation core requirements or the major. Standard calculator is TI-84.
Pre-requisites: ACT 17 OR SAT 400 OR MAT081 OR M081 1
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
MAT110
Mathematics Models: Graphical and Spatial
This course will focus on mathematical reasoning and modeling of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills. Students will use technology (graphing calculators/computers) to develop a conceptual understanding of problem-solving techniques that will strengthen decision-making skills. The problems to be studied will be taken from the following areas: graphs and functions in the coordinate plane, linear equations, geometric shapes and relationships, area/volume measure and scaling. Not applicable on SCM majors.
Pre-requisites: ACT 22 OR SAT 520 OR MAT098 OR M098 1 OR MAT1GE
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MAT111
Mathematical Models: Statisticaland Numerical
This course will focus on mathematical reasoning and modeling of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills. Students will use technology (graphing calculators/computers) to develop a conceptual understanding of problem-solving techniques that will strengthen decision-making skills. The problems to be studied will be taken from the following areas: probability, statistics, and financial mathematics. Not applicable on SCM majors.
Not applicable to SCM majors Standard calculator is TI-84
Pre-requisites: ACT 22 OR SAT 520 OR MAT098 OR M098 1
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
MAT112
Mathematics for Elementary Educ
Intended primarily for students majoring in elementary education, this course focuses on mathematical reasoning and problem solving. Topics include: whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers and the number system, arithmetic operations and number theory. Not applicable on SCM majors.
Not applicable on SCM majors
WARNING: This course is intended for Early Childhoodand Elementary Education majors and does not satisfy the general education mathematics requirement for other majors.
Pre-requisites: ACT 22 OR SAT 520 OR MAT098 OR M098 1
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MAT211
Functions and Calculus I
A study of calculus techniques and applications. An investigation of limits, continuity and derivatives of polynomial, rational and trigonometric functions. (A review of pre-calculus topics and trigonometric identities is included when appropriate.) Derivative techniques include power, chain, product and quotient rules as well as derivatives of trigonometric functions. Applications include optimization, implicit differentiation and related rates. Introduces the definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
Standard calculator is TI-84.
Pre-requisites: ACT 22 OR SAT 520 OR MAT098 OR M098 1
Every Fall Semester Hours: 5.00
MAT215
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry I
Includes limits, continuity, differentiation of simple algebraic and transcendental functions, implicit differentiation, related rates, maxima and minima problems.
Standard calculator is TI-84.
Pre-requisites: ACT 29 OR SAT 650 OR MAT098 OR M098 1
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MAT216
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry II
Covers antiderivatives, definite integrals, the calculation of areas and volumes, lengths of curves, logarithmic and exponential functions.
Standard calculator is TI-84
Pre-requisites: MAT215 OR MAT211
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MAT309
Advanced Mathematical Principles
A survey of basic mathematical topics including: numeration systems, rational numbers, real numbers, complex numbers; functions; algebra and equation solving; trigonometry; area, volume, and capacity. Basic ideas will be studied and explored from an advanced perspective.
Open to math secondary education and math majors and minors only.
Pre-requisites: MAT211 OR MAT215
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
MAT311
Probability and Statistics w/Lab
Covers descriptive statistics, counting techniques, basic rules of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing regression and correlation. Graphing calculators and computer software will be relied upon heavily. Lecture and Lab.
Instructor may override prereq. Standard calculator is TI-84.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: MAT111 OR MAT211 & MAT110 OR MAT215
Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
MAT312
Modern Abstract Algebra
Study of algebraic properties of groups, rings, fields, and integral domains. Covers introduction to the integers, real and complex numbers, rings of polynomials over real numbers, quotient rings, isomorphisms, and homomorphisms.
Pre-requisites: MAT211 OR MAT215
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
MAT313
Modern Geometry
An examination of plane Euclidean geometry. Additional topics covered in finite, affine and projective Euclidean, and selected non-Euclidean geometry from both the axiomatic and transformational approaches.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Pre-requisites: MAT215 OR MAT211
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
MAT314
Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to sets, relations and functions, combinatories, mathematical proofs (by induction and indirect proofs); theory and application of graphs, trees, networks and circuits. Emphasis on problem solving.
Pre-requisites: MAT215 OR MAT211
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
MAT315
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry III
A continuation of the study of calculus techniques and applications. Topics covered include infinite series, parametric equations, vectors and vector-valued functions.
Standard calculator is TI-84.
Pre-requisites: MAT215 OR MAT211
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MAT316
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry IV
A study of multivariable calculus including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus.
Standard calculator is TI-84
Pre-requisites: MAT216
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
MAT317
Differential Equations
A study of ordinary differential equations including separable equations, linear equations, orthogonal and oblique trajectories, method of undetermined coefficients, series solutions, the Laplace transform, and numerical methods. Offered on demand.
Pre-requisites: MAT316
On demand Hours: 3.00
MAT318
Linear Algebra
A study of systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vectors, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.
Pre-requisites: MAT215 OR MAT211
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MAT419
Senior Seminar in Mathematics
Intended for secondary mathematics education majors, this course examines the mathematical content of grades K-12 from the perspective of higher education. Student participation in class discussions as well as student presentations based on an independent examination of current literature is expected and will play a critical role in this class.
This course is required by all secondary education/math majors - others require instructor permission. Additional fee may be applicable
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
MAT492
Senior Readings in Mathematics
A required readings course for mathematics majors during their senior year. The readings will be taken from a faculty-approved list and written reqports over all readings will be required. Each student will also compile and submit a portfolio of significant work done during their undergraduate courses in mathematics. Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
MIN101
Intro to Christian Ministries
This course is designed as an exploration into different types of ministry and the underlying precepts that guide the practice of Christian Ministry. The course will introduce the purpose, challenge and scope of ministry in general and will involve the learner in beginning to understand his/her call to ministry. Emphasis will be given to holistic development and the importance of a missional/community-based approach to ministry. Annually Hours: 3.00
MIN121
Short Term Missions Seminar
The course will introduce students to the fundamental theology and practice of short term missions. The day-long seminar is designed in coordination with and in support of the purposes of the JSO University Ministries short-term missions projects held throughout the year. This understanding will provide more effective implementation of the short term missions projects across the Judson University campus and far into the future. Fall, even years Hours: 1.00
MIN131
Short Term Missions Project
The course will provide students the opportunity to experience a team-oriented Short-term Missions Project in which implementation of missions theology will be practiced on a short term missions, cross-cultural context. The week-long (minimum) project is designed by and in support of the missions partnering purposes of the JSO University Ministries short-term missions projects held throughout the year. The understanding gained through integrative experience will provide more effective implementation of the short term missions projects across the Judson University campus and far into the future. Minimum Hours: 0.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
MIN221X
Adolescent Culture
Focuses on the spiritual, psychological and social problems confronting adolescents, and on learning to adapt old paradigms in order to reach individuals and groups both outside and within a Christian environment.
Cross-listed with SOC221X.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MIN230
Children's Ministries: Principles and Practices
This course will explore various approaches to ministry among children with emphasis on the integration of biblical and theoretical foundations, including child development, learning theory, nature and formation of children, and discipleship and education of children. Every Other Year Hours: 3.00
MIN231
Youth Min/Adolescent Studies: Principles and Practices
This course is designed to give the student a basic, overall understanding of youth ministry. The course will pose two questions: Who are adolescents and how does one effectively minister to them? Special emphasis will be given to the holistic development of adolescents, the exploration of contemporary adolescent issues, and the importance of a missional/community-based approach to youth ministry. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MIN235
Family Ministries: Principles and Practices
This course will explore various approaches to ministry among families with emphasis on the integration of biblical and theoretical foundations, including learning theory, processes of family life, including stages and phases, process of family development, and the history of family in the church. Annually Hours: 3.00
MIN240
Adult Ministries: Principles and Practices
This course will explore various approaches to ministry among adults with emphasis on teh integration of biblical and theoretical foundations, including adult development, adult learning theory, generational theory, and principles of spiritual formation. Every Other Year Hours: 3.00
MIN250
Consuming Missions: Prins/Pract of the Global Christian Movement
This course will emphasize a biblical theology of mission including movements of God as a centrifugal (sending out) being the Old Testament, the New Testament accounts of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, the creation and sending of the church into the world, and the spread of faith communities by Paul evidenced in the epistles. Additionally, we will explore integration of these biblical principles through a lens of cultural paradigms found in the practice of global Christian activity (missions) in a variety of real-time settings. Hours: 3.00
MIN260
Foundations in Church Planting
This course will examine the Biblical, theological, missiological, and historical foundations of church planting as a missionary activity. Emphasis will be placed on evaluation of historical church planting approaches in light of these foundations. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MIN295
Practicum I/Christian Ministries
This course will be conducted in the fall semester and will require two to three hours per week of involvement in a local, supervised ministry setting.
Co-requisites: MIN202
Pre-requisites: MIN101
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
MIN296
Pract II/Christian Ministries
This course will be conducted in the spring semester and will require two to three hours per week of involvement in a local, supervised ministry setting.
Pre-requisites: MIN295
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
MIN301
Leadership/Christian Ministries
Reviews the basic principles of leadership in organizations, current motivational theory, and how leaders cope with and create change. Emphasizes the underlying principles of leadership theory and how individuals can train themselves to be effective leaders in various organizations. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MIN311
Administration and Management inChristian Ministries

Pre-requisites: MIN102 & MIN202
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MIN325
Short-Term Missions Projects: Principles and Practices, Part 1
Because God's heart is for developing relationships and communicating His message with all people whom He created, people in ministry cannot afford the luxury of having a monocultural outlook. This course provides the student with a study of the principles and processes of communicating from one society to another. It focuses particularly on the communication of the Gospel and the relevance of the Incarnation as God's model for intercultural communication. This course will explore questions of culture, globalization and partnership for mission in the 21st Century, allowing students to gain a grasp of basic tools for exegeting a culture and understanding how to become effective partners (servants) in missions. It exposes students to new possibilities for missiological praxis so that they meet the challenge of contextualizing the gospel in an increasingly global community.
Principles/Practices Missions Fee(MIN325/MIN326): $1,500/$1,000 per course
Every other fall/spring Hours: 2.00
MIN326
Short-Term Missions Projects, Principles and Practices, Part 2
Because God's heart is for developing relationships and communicating His message with all people whom He created, people in ministry cannot afford the luxury of having a monocultural outlook. This course provides the student with a study of the principles and processes of communicating from one society to another. It focuses particularly on the communication of the Gospel and the relevance of the Incarnation as God's model for intercultural communication. This course will explore questions of culture, globalization and partnership for mission in the 21st Century, allowing students to gain a grasp of basic tools for exegeting a culture and understanding how to become effective partners (servants) in missions. It exposes students to new possibilities for missiological praxis so that they meet the challenge of contextualizing the gospel in an increasingly global community.
Principles/Practices Missions Fee(MIN325/MIN326): $1,500/$1,000 per course
Pre-requisites: MIN325
Sum 3 Week, odd years Hours: 2.00
MIN340
Mentoring/Christian Ministries
This course focuses on the skills needed for the development of mentoring relationships with adolescents; relationships which seek to foster spiritual and personal growth. It examines the theological and biblical foundations for such relationships. Emphasis will be placed on the development of mentoring skills as well as strategies to mobilize other adults for mentoring ministry.
Junior status.
Hours: 3.00
MIN385
Evangelism/Spiritual Formation
This course involves a study of the theology, methodologies, strategies, and techniques of evangelism and social action as an integral part of holistic, spiritual formation. Understood as a continuation of evangelism, this course will introduce a biblical philosophy of Christian formation through the practice of personal, corporate, and instructional disciplines.
Pre-requisites: BST101 & BST102
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
MIN395
Pract III/Christian Ministries
Guided field experience in ministry leadership requiring four to six hours of involvement along with one weekly class session.
Pre-requisites: MIN295 & MIN296 & MIN102 & MIN202
Every Fall Semester Hours: 2.00
MIN396
Pract IV/Christian Ministries
Guided field experience in ministry leadership requiring four to six hours of involvement along with one weekly class session.
Pre-requisites: MIN295 & MIN102 & MIN202
Every Spring Semester Hours: 2.00
MIN455
Senior Sem/Christian Ministries
This senior seminar course if a capstone experience for students completing their professional preparation for youth ministry and/or adolescent studies. The goal of this course is to synthesize knowledge gained in prior YMAS courses and discuss topics related specifically to the YM/AS field. Seminar students will work toward a deeper understanding of the issues, perspectives, and questions they will face as youth ministers/adolescent educators.
Christian Ministry department majors with senior standing only. Instructor may override pre-reqs.
Pre-requisites: MIN311 & MIN396 & MIN495
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MIN495
Internship/Christian Ministries
Extensive guided practice in youth ministry or an adolescent-specified field experience. Supervised responsibility for hands-on work totaling 20+ hours/week.
Pre-reqs: MIN311, MIN396, minimum overall GPA of 2.3 and minimum major GPA of 2.5, AND permission of the instructor.
Please contact the instructor to do a courseauthorization for you to register for this course.
Pre-requisites: MIN311 & MIN396
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 3.00
MUS001
Priv Voice Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs includes the hourly audit tuition rate.
Chair Approval: Dr Jones
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS002
Priv Piano Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS003
Priv Organ Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Chair Approval: Kania.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS004
Priv Guitar Instr., No Credit

Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS005
Priv Flute Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS006
Priv Oboe Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS007
Priv Clarinet Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS008
Priv Bassoon Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS009
Priv Saxophone Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS010
Priv Horn Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS011
Priv Trumpet Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS012
Priv Trombone Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS013
Priv Tuba/Euphon Instr., No Cred
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS014
Priv Percuss Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS015
Priv Violin Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS016
Priv Viola Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS017
Priv Cello Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS018
Priv Bass Instr., No Credit
Private instruction of the non-music major student in a specific musical instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week. May be repeated. Costs include the hourly audit tuition rate.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Please advise the student that one hour of audit tuition will be charged.This will affect their bill if their hours are below 12 or over 18.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS101
Priv Voice Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Chair Approval: Dr Jones
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS102
Priv Piano Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS103
Priv Organ Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Chair Approval: Kania.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS104
Priv Guitar Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS105
Priv Flute Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS106
Priv Oboe Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS107
Priv Clarinet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS108
Priv Bassoon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS109
Priv Saxophone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS110
Priv Horn Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS111
Priv Trumpet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS112
Priv Trombone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS113
Priv Tuba/Euphon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS114
Priv Percuss Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS115
Priv Violin Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS116
Priv Viola Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS117
Priv Cello Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS118
Priv Bass Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for freshmen and non-music majors, to include music majors on a non major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS131G
Class Guitar I
Group study of guitar at beginning levels. Applied music.
Group Instruction Fee: $110.00.
Every Semester Hours: 1.00
MUS142
Chamber Music Ensemble
Participation in a university chamber music ensemble. Regular rehearsals and public performances are required. Membership is open to any college student by permission of the director. Significant literature for each performance area is studied and performed. May be repeated. Students are permitted to apply up to four hours toward degree requirements; they are limited to two ensembles per semester. Note: Music majors must belong to at least one major performance ensemble (MUS143, 146 or 150) each term while in resident study. Membership in up to two organizations is allowed in a single term. Applied music.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 0.50
MUS143
Orchestra
Participation in a university large music ensemble. Regular rehearsals and public performances are required. Membership is open to any student by permission of the director. Significant literature for each performance area is studied and performed. May be repeated. Students are permitted to apply up to four hours toward degree requirements; they are limited to two ensembles per semester. Note: Music majors must belong to at least one major performance ensemble (MUS143, 146 or 150) each term while in resident study. Membership in up to two organizations is allowed in a single term. Applied music.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 0.50
MUS145
Jazz Ensemble
Participation in a university small music ensemble. Regular rehearsals and public performances are required. Membership is open to any student by permission of the director. Significant literature for each performance area is studied and performed. May be repeated. Students are permitted to apply up to four hours toward degree requirements; they are limited to two ensembles per semester. Note: Music majors must belong to at least one major performance ensemble (MUS143, 146 or 150) each term while in resident study. Membership in up to two organizations is allowed in a single term. Applied music...
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 0.50
MUS148
Chamber Singers
Participation in a college musical ensemble. Regular rehearsals and public performances are required. Membership is open to any college student by permission of the director. Significant literature for each performance area is studied and performed. May be repeated. Students are permitted to apply up to four hours toward degree requirements; they are limited to two ensembles per semester. Note: Music majors must belong to at least one major performance ensemble (MUS143, 146 or 150) each term while in resident study. Membership in up to two organizations is allowed in a single term. Applied music.
Professor permission required through an audition process.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 0.50
MUS150
University Choir
Participation in a university large music ensemble. Regular rehearsals and public performances are required. Membership is open to any student by permission of the director. Significant literature for each performance area is studied and performed. May be repeated. Students are permitted to apply up to four hours toward degree requirements; they are limited to two ensembles per semester. Note: Music majors must belong to at least one major performance ensemble (MUS143, 146 or 150) each term while in resident study. Membership in up to two organizations is allowed in a single term. Applied music. Every Semester Hours: 0.50
MUS151
Music Theory I
Systematic study of harmonic practice of 18th, 19th, and 20th century masters, including: fundamentals of musical notation and reading, intervals, triads, figured bass, and all diatonic and chromatically altered chords. Divided into four semesters. Must be taken in succession.
Co-requisites: MUS153
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MUS152
Music Theory II
Systematic study of harmonic practice of 18th, 19th, and 20th century masters, including: fundamentals of musical notation and reading, intervals, triads, figured bass, and all diatonic and chromatically altered chords. Divided into four semesters. Must be taken in succession.
Co-requisites: MUS154
Pre-requisites: MUS151
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MUS153
Ear Training/Sight Singing I
A study and development of the aural skills in the experience of the student. A two semester course, one hour each term.
Co-requisites: MUS151
Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
MUS154
Ear Training/Sight Singing II
A study and development of the aural skills in the experience of the student. A two semester course, one hour each term.
Co-requisites: MUS152
Pre-requisites: MUS153
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
MUS155
Keyboard Harmony I
Basic geography of the keyboard including triads, seventh chords, harmonization of melodies and basses, realization of figured basses, modulation to closely related keys, transposition of simple progressions, and simple improvisations. Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
MUS156
Keyboard Harmony II
Basic geography of the keyboard including triads, seventh chords, harmonization of melodies and basses, realization of figured basses, modulation to closely related keys, transposition of simple progressions, and simple improvisations.
Pre-requisites: MUS155
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
MUS173
Recording Techniques I
Introduction to the equipment of the studio and its use, studio session procedures and recording production. Includes familiarization with multi-track recording, sequencing, synchronization, digital signal processing, computer based editing, and MIDI technologies.
Pre-requisites: MUS152 & MUS154 & MUS224
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
MUS174
Introduction to Music Publishing and Copyright
Music publishing as related to ownership and exploitation of music copyrights. Overview of copyright bascis, licensing, and the process of music publishing from the creation of a song through its distribution. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
MUS181
Music Appreciation
An examination of technical and artistic elements designed to provide the student with an understanding of and identity with the language of music. Field trips to concerts and exhibits. Fall or Spring every yr Hours: 3.00
MUS201
Priv Voice Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Chair Approval: Dr Jones
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS202
Priv Piano Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS203
Priv Organ Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Chair Approval: Dr Kania
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS204
Priv Guitar Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS205
Priv Flute Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS206
Priv Oboe Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS207
Priv Clarinet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS208
Priv Bassoon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS209
Priv Saxophone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS210
Priv Horn Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS211
Priv Trumpet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS212
Priv Trombone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS213
Priv Tuba/Euphon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS214
Priv Percuss Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS215
Priv Violin Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS216
Priv Viola Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS217
Priv Cello Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS218
Priv Bass Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for sophomore level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS219
Private Composition Lessons
Private lessons in composition.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Pre-requisites: MUS152 & MUS154
Every Fall and Spring Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS224
Intro to Music Technology
This course introduces the fundamental skills in digital music notation software and electronic scorewriting techniques. Course uses the Thompson Centre MIDI lab.
Pre-requisites: MUS151 & MUS152
Sum 3 Week, odd years Hours: 2.00
MUS224H
Intro to Mus Technology - Honors
Sum 3 Week, odd years Hours: 2.00
MUS234
Intro to Music Composition
This course serves as an introduction into the study, analysis, and application of the basic tools of composing music.
Co-requisites: MUS251 & MUS253
Pre-requisites: MUS153 & MUS154
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS241EG
Diction for Singers I: English and German
The study of lyric diction and the International Phonetic Alphabet as it is applied to standard English and German repertoire. Offered every two years. Required for vocal performance majors, and highly recommended for students with a vocal emphasis, or music education majors.
Required course for a major in music with a vocal emphasis.
Pre-requisites: MUS101
Fall, even years Hours: 2.00
MUS241FI
Diction for Singers II: French and Italian
The study of lyric diction and the International Phonetic Alphabet as it is applied to standard French and Italian repertoire. Offered every two years. Required for vocal performance majors, and highly recommended for students with vocal emphasis, or music education majors.
Required course for a major in music with a vocal emphasis
Pre-requisites: MUS101
Fall, odd years Hours: 2.00
MUS242
Vocal Literature
A study of the standard recital, concert, and operatic repertoire. Offered every two years. Required for vocal performance majors, and highly recommended for students with a vocal emphasis, or music education majors. Spring, odd years Hours: 2.00
MUS243
Piano Literature
Understanding the major literature for the piano, divided by historical periods, Baroque though the 20th Century; required for a major in music with piano emphasis. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS251
Music Theory III
Systematic study of harmonic practice of 18th, 19th, and 20th century masters, including: fundamentals of musical notation and reading, intervals, triads, figured bass, and all diatonic and chromatically altered chords. Divided into four semesters. Must be taken in succession.
Co-requisites: MUS253
Pre-requisites: MUS152
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MUS252
Music Theory IV
Systematic study of harmonic practice of 18th, 19th, and 20th century masters, including: fundamentals of musical notation and reading, intervals, triads, figured bass, and all diatonic and chromatically altered chords. Divided into four semesters. Must be taken in succession.
Co-requisites: MUS254
Pre-requisites: MUS251
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MUS253
Ear Training/Sight Singing III
A study and development of the aural skills in the experience of the student. A two semester course, one hour each term.
Co-requisites: MUS251
Pre-requisites: MUS154
Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
MUS254
Ear Training/Sight Singing IV
A study and development of the aural skills in the experience of the student. A two semester course, one hour each term.
Co-requisites: MUS252
Pre-requisites: MUS253
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
MUS257
Hist/Practice of Worship Music
The historical development of hymns, hymn tunes and other worship music from the Early Church to the present. Covers standards of evaluation of hymns, tunes, hymnals, praise and worship music, choruses, and application of hymnology in its use in the Church. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS280
The History of Rock and Roll The Medium and Its Message
It can be argued that nothing has changed the fabric of American society over the past 50+ years more than the emergence of rock and roll music as a viable form of musical expression, from both a financial and an artistic standpoint. This class will explore the agent of change from both a sociological and a musical perspective--emphasizing the connection between the 'new' teen-agers of the 1950s and 60s and their music--and analyze its impact on the commonly held attitudes and values of the day, both during the music's inception and throughout the 60s, 70s, and beyond. We will also study the evolution of rock and roll music, and its various subsets, from Elvis to the Beatles to psychedelic rock to pink to MTV to hip hop. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS280H
The History of Rock and Roll The Medium/Its Message - Honors
It can be argued that nothing has changed the fabric of American society over the past 50+ years more than the emergence of rock and roll music as a viable form of musical expression, from both a financial and an artistic standpoint. This class will explore the agent of change from both a sociological and a musical perspective--emphasizing the connection between the 'new' teen-agers of the 1950s and 60s and their music--and analyze its impact on the commonly held attitudes and values of the day, both during the music's inception and throughout the 60s, 70s, and beyond. We will also study the evolution of rock and roll music, and its various subsets, from Elvis to the Beatles to psychedelic rock to pink to MTV to hip hop. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS301
Priv Voice Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Chair Approval: Dr Jones
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS302
Priv Piano Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Chair Approval: Kania.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS303
Priv Organ Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Chair Approval: Kania.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS304
Priv Guitar Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS305
Priv Flute Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS306
Priv Oboe Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS307
Priv Clarinet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS308
Priv Bassoon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS309
Priv Saxophone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS310
Priv Horn Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS311
Priv Trumpet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS312
Priv Trombone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS313
Priv Tuba/Euphon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS314
Priv Percuss Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS315
Priv Violin Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS316
Priv Viola Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS317
Priv Cello Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS318
Priv Bass Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for junior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour session for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS319
Private Composition Lessons
Private lessons in composition.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Pre-requisites: MUS152 & MUS154
Every Fall and Spring Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS333
Improvisation
Examines literature and techniques for arranging and improvising. On demand.
Assigned to private lesson instructor
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
On demand Hours: 1.00
MUS347
Fundamentals of Conducting
The study and rehearsal of basic conducting skills including score analysis, conducting patterns, musical terminology, and practical conducting experience in class.
Chair Approval: Dr Jones
Pre-requisites: MUS151 & MUS131P OR MUS102 OR MUS103
Fall, even years Hours: 2.00
MUS348
Choral Conducting and Literature
Conducting technique specifically applied to choral performance. Included will be a study of tone production, diction, choir organization and material from a wide range of choral literature.
Pre-requisites: MUS347
Spring, odd years Hours: 2.00
MUS349
Instrumental Conducting/Literatu
Conducting technique specifically applied to instrumental performance. Included will be a study of basic conducting technique and patterns, use of the baton, advanced instrumental conducting techniques, score study, clefs and transpositions, rehearsal planning, programming, administrative responsibilities, and material from a wide range of instrumental literature.
Pre-requisites: MUS347 & MUS348
Fall, odd years Hours: 2.00
MUS350
Music Tour

Fee to be announced
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 3.00
MUS351
History/Literature of Music I
This course examines the history of western music from antiquity through the renaissance, and emphasizes aural and visual style analysis of important musical literature from each time period. Music majors should take MUS 351, 352, and 451 in sequence. Fall, odd years. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
MUS352
History/Literature of Music II
This course examines the history of western music during the baroque and classic periods, and emphasizes aural and visual style analysis of important musical literature from each time period. Music majors should take MUS 351, 352, and 451 in sequence. Spring, even years. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS353
Counterpoint
A study of 18th-century contrapuntal style, requiring written assignments and analysis of scores from simple to complex. Alternates with MUS354.
Pre-requisites: MUS251
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
MUS354
Form and Analysis of Music
Covers melodic, rhythmic, harmonic, and structural elements of traditional musical forms as seen in representative scores from 16th to 20th century. Alternates with MUS353; Spring, even years.
Pre-requisites: MUS251
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS359
Opera Workshop
A study of the techniques of staging opera arias and scenes culmination in an opera scene recital or a chamber Opera production. By audition only. Every Spring Semester Minimum Hours: 0.50
Maximum Hours: 3.00
MUS373
Recording Techniques II
MUS373 Recording Techniques II is a continuation of MUS173 Recording Techniques I and MUS224 Into to Music Publishing. The class focuses on controlling surfaces, high-resolution audio, advanced processing capabilities, code comparisons, extensive microphone techniques, synchronization, cutting-edge immersive recording and mixing techniques. The application of all these processes and current practice are examined and experienced. Preparation of advanced-format deliverables to industry standards and requirements is also covered.
Pre-requisites: MUS173
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
MUS401
Priv Voice Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Chair Approval: Dr Jones
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS401H
Priv Voice Instr., Credit-Honors

Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS402
Priv Piano Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Chair Approval: Kania.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS403
Priv Organ Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Chair Approval: Dr Kania
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS404
Priv Guitar Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS405
Priv Flute Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS406
Priv Oboe Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS407
Priv Clarinet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS408
Priv Bassoon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS409
Priv Saxophone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS410
Priv Horn Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS411
Priv Trumpet Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS412
Priv Trombone Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS413
Priv Tuba/Euphon Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS414
Priv Percuss Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS415
Priv Violin Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS416
Priv Viola Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS417
Priv Cello Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS418
Priv Bass Instr., Credit
Private instruction of the student in a specific musical instrument or voice, for senior level music majors on their major instrument. One half-hour lesson is required each week for one hour credit; a full hour lesson for two hours credit. Public performance in a recital each term is mandatory. Adjudications by faculty committees at midterm and at the conclusion of each term. Applied music.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS419
Private Composition Lessons
Private lessons in composition.
Private Instruction Fee: $225.00.
Pre-requisites: MUS152 & MUS154
Every Fall and Spring Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
MUS451
History/Literature of Music III
This course examines the history of western music during the romantic and 20th century periods up to the present, and emphasizes aural and visual style analysis of important musical literature from each time period. Music majors should take MUS 351, 352, and 451 in sequence. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS455
Vocal Pedagogy
A course designed for future teachers of singing. A study of the vocal instrument and various methods of teaching voice. Practical application is made as the students observe professional teaching. The students will be observed as they teach a lesson. Required for vocal performance majors and vocal pedagogy minors, others by professor's permission.
4 semesters of private voice lessons required: MUS101/201
Faculty consent required.
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
MUS456
Piano Pedagogy
Procedures for teaching keyboard fundamentals and musicianship, technique and its historical development, and survey of graded teaching materials are included. Professor's permission required. Required for piano performance majors and pedagogy minors.
4 semesters of private piano lessons required: MUS102/202
Faculty consent required.
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
MUS458
Orchestration
Instruments of the band, orchestra and scoring for voices are studied with regard to range, tone quality, and technical possibilities. Scoring and arranging for ensembles and full orchestra are also discussed.
Pre-requisites: MUS152
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
MUS471
Junior Recital
To be taken during the semester when the junior recital is performed. This course is supervised and taught by the assigned private teacher. A letter grade is to be given for the recital.
Coreq MUS301-318 (junior level). Assign to private lesson instructor.
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS473
Senior Music Business Project
A summation of past work plus the development of new work in the student's major field, culminating in a faculty-juried business plan presentation and faculty-juried public performance. Students will produce a record album and portfolio artifacts. Also includes cooperative work with other senior project students in artist relations, concert promotion and concert production. This is the capstone course for Music Business and Entrepreneurship.
Co-requisites: BUS454 & MUS401 OR MUS402 OR MUS404
Pre-requisites: MUS151 & MUS152 & MUS153 & MUS154 & WOR142 & WOR152 & MUS173
Hours: 2.00
MUS481
Senior Recital
To be taken during the semester when the senior recital is performed. This course is supervised and taught by the assigned private teacher. A letter grade is to be given for the recital.
Coreq MUS401-418 (senior level) Assigned to private lesson instructor
Every Semester Hours: 0.00
MUS495
Practicum in Music/Church Music
Provides one to three hours appropriate to class level for prearranged internship experiences. Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
MUS499E
Half Hour Recital
A half-hour recital with related research and observations. Each of the following groups will have a customized syllabus: music education majors, elementary education or secondary physical ed. majors w/ music concentration. Music performance and pedagogy minors. It is expected that the student will perform their senior recital during the same semester in which they are registered for MUS499E.
Assigned to private lesson instructor Prereq: At least 6 semesters of study on the instrument to be displayed in the recital is required.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 2.00
PHL260
Introduction to Philosophy
(IAI H4900) An introduction to the discipline of philosophy through surveying philosophical problems, issues and ideas (together with their representative proponents) which have formed lasting concerns throughout human history.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 OR ACT 27 OR SAT 610
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
PHL267
Comparative Religions
A comparative study of the major world religions with an effort to view them as they offer interpretation to key religious ideas such as God, sin, immorality, atonement, and eschatology. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
PHL364
Christian Ethics
An exploration of questions and issues surrounding the nature and practice of social and personal morality, evaluating various theories of general (philosophical) ethics together with a range of Christian proposals which have incorporated/rejected to varying degrees aspect of these theories. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
PHS241
Earth Science I w/Lab
(IAI P1905L) Covers fundamentals of geology, including mapping, rocks and minerals, volcanoes, glaciers, ground water, wind and water erosion, along with weathering factors, the interpretation of modern landforms, and oceanography. Lecture and lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Varies Hours: 4.00
PHS245
Astronomy w/Lab
A description of the modern physical theories of the origin, structure and evolution of the universe. The course will explain how astronomers gather information and reach their conclusions. The student will learn the distinction between theories which are well-established and those which are at the frontier of knowledge and consequently highly speculative. Varies Hours: 4.00
PHY237
General Physics I w/Lab
A non-calculus physics course covering statics mechanics, energy, wave motion and thermodynamics. Lecture and Lab.
Math placement test may override prereq
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: MAT211 OR MAT215 OR MAT216
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
PHY238
General Physics II w/Lab
A continuation of General Physics I including, electricity, magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. Lecture and lab.
Science/Math Fee: $150.00
Pre-requisites: PHY237
Spring, even years Hours: 4.00
PHY247
Calculus-based Physics I w/Lab
A calculus-based physics course covering statics, mechanics, energy, vibrational motion and thermodynamics. Lecture and Lab.
MAT215/H is a pre- or co-requisite. A 'C' or better in MAT215/H is required if taken as a pre-requisite.
Pre-requisites: MAT215
Every Fall Semester Hours: 5.00
PHY248
Calculus-based Physics II w/Lab
A Continuation of General Physics I including, electricity, magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. Lecture and lab.
MAT216 is a pre- or co-requisite. A 'C' or better in MAT216 is required if taken as a pre-requisite.
Pre-requisites: MAT216 & PHY237
Hours: 5.00
POL222
American Government
(IAI S5900) The development of constitutional government in the State and Nation. Surveys the process, structure, functions of American political systems. Special attention is given to State and Federal Constitutions. Meets Illinois Board of Education requirements for teacher certification. Sum 3 Week, odd years Hours: 3.00
POL495
Pre-Law Practicum II
Students are placed in local law offices or court agencies where tasks related to the legal profession are observed and/or performed. The experience requires the production of a written paper.
Advance arrangement with professor required
Pre-requisites: POL222
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 3.00
PSY111
Introduction to Psychology
(IAI S6900) An overview of persons, ideas, and principles in the scientific study of behavior; historical development and current status of psychology; and investigative activities and significant findings in psychology. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
PSY215X
Marriage and the Family
The course covers contemporary courtship, marriage and family behavior; factors in dating, marriage and interaction, and counseling instruments.
Cross-listed as SOC215X
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
PSY221
Child Development
A study of theory and research related to human growth and development from prenatal period through adulthood; emphasis on factors influencing development especially in areas of social, emotional, cognitive, cultural, and personality functioning.
Coreq EDU231EC for entitlement
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
PSY224
Adolescent Development
Studies behavioral characteristics and the social development of adolescents, including identity, cognitive development, peer groups, education, sexuality, and substance abuse.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Semester Hours: 3.00
PSY225X
Introduction to Child Advocacy
This course is the introductory course for child advocacy studies. This course covers the history, comparative perspectives, the legal framework, responses to child maltreatment, the skills necessary to do the work, other pertinent issues pertaining to child maltreatment and child advocacy, and the future. The field of child maltreatment is fraught with controversy. Much of the class focuses on these controversies. The approach of the course will be from a variety of diverse, professional perspectives including the perspectives of a prosecuting attorney versus a defense attorney. The course is designed for students majoring in sociology, psychology, criminal justice, education, ministry, or other areas where knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children might be necessary.
Cross-listed with SOC225X.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 & SOC151
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
PSY227X
Adult Development and Aging
An introduction to the field of gerontology and its approaches to the social, psychological, and physical concerns of aging. A special concern will be aging well in later life. Includes personal exposure to the aged and their environment, and consideration of ministries among the aged as viable vocational options.
Instructor may override prereq Cross-listed as SOC227X
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR SOC151
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
PSY232
A Life Lived Well: Positive Psychology and Human Adjustment
This course introduces the relatively new subdiscipline of Positive Psychology, which explores human flourishing as opposed to distress and mental illness. The three pillars of positive psychology - the pleasant life (positive emotions), the good life (engagement and flow), and the meaningful life (using strengths in service), will be explored by both a review of empirical research and related experiential exercises. Specific topics such as optimism, hope, forgiveness, gratitude, creativity, and empathy will be discussed in light of the Christian faith.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
PSY296
Psychology Internship I
A supervised experience designed and tailored by the student and the program's coordinator. Requires placement in clinic, agency, residential facility, school or appropriate equivalent.
Pre-requisites: SSC281
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
PSY301
Reflecting on the Conversation
This class builds on GEN101 and prepares the student for GEN401. Drawing on their entire Judson experience students will reflect and articulate how that experience (major, general education, faith formation, co-curricular activities, etc.) is shaping them as whole persons. Through guided discussion and assignments, students will envision and articulate how the Judson experience will affect how they shape their world. Annually Hours: 1.00
PSY309
Interpersonal Relationships
The study of personal relationships through the application of communication and conflict resolution theory and techniques and exposure to factors that contribute to successful relationships. Self-awareness on topics such as friendship, love and gender are used to promote understanding in interpersonal relationships.
Instructor may override prereq
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
PSY312
Conditioning and Learning
An experimental psychology course studying theories and research methods in classical and instrumental conditioning, complex habit formation, transfer of training retention and function of rewards. Lecture and lab.
Pre-requisites: PSY391X
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
PSY315
Physiological Psychology
A biological and physiological approach to understanding human and animal behavior, and a study of the brain, nervous system, hormones, and sensory processes as they relate to observable behavior.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Hours: 3.00
PSY321
Abnormal Psychology
Studies the nature of abnormal behavior and its social significance; description, dynamics, and causes of psychological disorder; methods of diagnosis, therapy, and ecological interactions; and supporting and accompanying abnormal adjustments.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR SOC151
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
PSY322X
Social Psychology
Reviews psychological principles and underlying social behavior; social perception, interpersonal relations, motivation formation, change, and assessment of attitudes, values, and beliefs; conformity and non conformity; and social interaction in small groups, role theory, leadership, organizational behavior, and change.
Cross-listed as SOC322X
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
PSY323
Personality
A critical comparison of various theories concerning structure, dynamics, functions, and development of personality as well as selected topics in current research.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR SOC151
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
PSY324
Cognitive Psychology
An investigation of human mental processes through empirical methods of study. Abilities such as memory, problem solving, reasoning, and their relation to intelligence are examined.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Hours: 3.00
PSY327
Psychological Tests/Measurement
An assessment of human characteristics and abilities such as intelligence, performance, academic achievement, and personality, and how psychological tests are constructed, utilized, and evaluated, clinically and theoretically. Lecture and lab.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
PSY328
History/Systems of Psychology
Examines historical antecedents of psychology such as medicine, philosophy, and mathematics as they related to the development of psychology. Major historical schools of psychological thought are studied.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Hours: 3.00
PSY330X
Gender, Self, and Society
An overview of theories of development of sex differences as well as gender as a social construction. This course will emphasize feminist theory as applied to different areas of social and psychological development, such as personality traits, aggression, achievement, cognitive ability, and relationships. Students will examine their personal experiences related to gender in light of the course content and Christian faith.
Cross-listed as SOC330X
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
PSY375X
Health Aspects/Chem Dependency
Focuses on the major categories of psychoactive drugs and their use/abuse. It surveys substance abuse and dependence and the addiction process. It examines models of treatment and prevention based on major theories of addiction and the relationship of addiction to physical, mental, relational, and spiritual health.
Cross-listed as ESS375X
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
PSY380
Crisis Intervention with At-Risk Adolescents
This course serves as counseling 'first aid,' meaning that a student will develop skills in: crisis intervention with adolescents and their families; recognizing and conceptualizing 'at risk' adolescents; identifying some specific adolescent disorders; constructing comprehensive intervention and prevention strategies; and collaboration with other helping professionals, including how and when to make referrals.
Pre-requisites: PSY221 OR PSY224 OR PSY321
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
PSY391X
Statistics and Research Design
Gives rationale, assumptions and applications of experimental designs and statistical techniques used in analysis of research data; measures of central tendency, normal distribution, probability, linear regression, correlations, chi square, t tests and analysis of variance; and models based on anthropological, psychological and sociological experiments.
Cross-listed as SOC391X
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR SOC151
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
PSY392
Research Methods/Social Sciences
An introduction to research methods currently used in psychology and other social sciences. The course includes the steps involved in research from the foundation of research questions to the interpretation of findings. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are introduced. Students will also learn basic skills in using current statistical software packages. Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
PSY411
Christian Values/Human Sexuality
An interdisciplinary examination of the physiological, cultural, psychological and biblical bases of human sexual behavior with attention devoted to student development of a personal perspective toward sexuality that integrates Christian values and moral integrity.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 & PSY224
Faculty consent required.
On demand Hours: 3.00
PSY419
Integration of Psychology and Christianity
Studies psychology as an academic discipline from a Christian perspective. Investigation of mutual relationship between psychological and theological concepts and data and examination of models relating science and religion, psychology and theology, and professional practice and personal living.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Must be at sophomore status before class begins.
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
PSY424
Counseling Theories
Reviews the theoretical foundations, techniques and processes of major models of counseling. Attention is given to characteristics of an effective counselor, ethics, case conceptualization and the development of rudimentary helping skills. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
PSY425
Basic Helping Techniques
Requires application of theories and practices of counseling including special reference to adjustment and development of the college student as a 'people helper.' Students learn and practice basic counseling skills in class while observing the work of counselors in an off-campus placement.
Instructor may override prereqs.
Co-requisites: PSY496X
Pre-requisites: PSY424
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 3.00
PSY491
Senior Seminar in Psychology
This capstone course will require senior psychology majors to reflect on crucial topics related to their undergraduate education and continuing education. Students will also explore themselves by identifying, clarifying, and planning for their post-college aspirations. These explorations will occur through the creation of a professional portfolio, class discussion, and presentations. Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
PSY496
Psychology Internship II
A supervised experience designed and tailored by the student and the program's coordinator. Requires placement in clinic, agency, residential facility, school or appropriate equivalent.
Pre-requisites: SSC281
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
SAP300
Chicago Semester: Arts and the City
This Seminar seeks to develop students' critical thinking skills through exposure to weekly art events that vary both in type (drama, dance, music, visual art, performance art, and poetry) and size (mainstream events like the Art Institute and Chicago Shakespeare and out-of-the-way ones like the Dance Center of Columbia College and the Hothouse's Backyard Variety Show). Small-group discussions and frequent in-class speakers encourage students not only to enjoy the art they experience, but to evaluate and better understand it. Creativity exercises offer an experiential opportunity for students to broaden their understanding in a hands-on way while the final art project helps students explore their own creativity by engaging an issue or problem encountered during the semester (personal, spiritual, social, philosophical, religious, etc.) through the medium of artistic expression. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP303
Chicago Semester: History of Religion and Society in Urban America
This course examines religious social engagement in urban America through the lens of history. We'll focus on the 20th Century and consider a range of issues, including industrialism, immigration, race relations, and gender roles. Throughout we'll use stories from the past to ask ourselves persistent questions. How do religious rituals and beliefs impact our private and public lives? Does faith inform racial divides? How should religion and the city be connected? The course will include lectures, discussions, field trips, and reading and writing assignments. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP306
Chicago Semester: History of Values and Vocation Seminar
This seminar welcomes students and instructor into a semester-long conversation about modern work and American culture. We will explore different forces shaping our working lives, including gender roles, social position, and the power of corporations. Tossing caution to the wind, we'll think big, trying not only to understand these forces and our response to them, but also probing for deeper theological meaning. In the end, the professor will invite (read: require) students to formulate a vocational vision for their lives. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP309
Chicago Semester: History of Metropolitan Seminar
In this seminar, we explore the contradictions in a city that is positioning itself as a hub in the global economy, while striving to respect its racial and cultural diversity. Metropolitan Seminar makes use of the city as a laboratory, investigating the trends and social conditions facing its residents and workers. The seminar explores these issues through neighborhood tours, field trips and presentations from guest speakers who present a variety of insights and perspectives. The seminar explores the future of urbanized society, and presents policy options for its future residents. At the heart of the course is the belief that the city, with its problems and possibilities, still has the potential to become the 'good city', even the city of God, depending on how willing its leaders and citizens are to confront the problems we face--problems that are society's not just Chicago's. The city is at once good, fallen, yet also capable of redemption. This theology is the implicit curriculum of the course. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information. the glob
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP312
Chicago Semester: Practicum
Once a week, you'll join in a small group to discuss your internship and the city. You'll meet weekly for an hour and a half in a group that brings together students and different colleges and varying backgrounds. You'll also embark on neighborhood visits. Guided by a leader, your small group will tackle a range of topics from the city, to internships, to you. At its best, the group helps you find connections between these topics. To do that, it combines academic work (writing and critical analysis), informational reflection, and communal support. We begin by sharing autobiographies and move into a series of writing assignments and conversations that explore the power of place in shaping human experience, including ours. All the while, we keep tabs on each other to make sure no one gets lost in the rush of a big town, 3 million strong. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Minimum Hours: 4.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP391
Au Sable Institute (Biol 345): Wildlife Ecology
Ecology, conservation, and stewardship of wildlife species and their habitats. Includes growth and structure of natural and managed populations, environmental and human social factors affecting wildlife communities, and wildlife conservation. The course is set in the context of historical development of field from management, to ecology, and the land ethic of Leopold. Includes management and stewardship of non-game and endangered species, and long-term prospects of wildlife in changing environmental, climatic, and social contexts. Prerequisite: one course in biology, or permission of professor.
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP392
AuSable Institute (Biol 322): Aquatic Biology/Great Lakes
Ecology, identification, systematics, culture, and care of aquatic plants and animals, and adaptations to freshwater environments. Aquatic life is studied in lakes, ponds, bogs, marshes, streams, and in the laboratory. The course assesses human impacts on aquatic species and ecosystems, presents procedures for the stewardship of aquatic habitats, and introduces aquatic restoration ecology. Prerequisite: one year of general biology or one semester each of general zoology and general botany. (4-credits; 100 contact hours)
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP393
Au Sable Institute (Chem 332): Environmental Chemistry
Principles, analysis, and impact of chemical movement and distribution - both natural and human-induced - in natural environments focusing primarily on the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Sampling and analytical methods are included for water, soil, and air. Work is conducted both on site in natural habitats and the laboratory. Prerequisite: one year of general chemistry and one semester of either biochemistry or organic chemistry. (4-credits; 100 contact hours)
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP395
Au Sable Inst (Biol/Geog 311): Field Botany
Field and lab identification, systematics, natural history, and ecology of vascular plants as components of natural communities. Ecological features, including stratification, history, plant zonation, adaptation, and animal interactions are examined. Relationships of plant families and higher groups are covered. Project and/or plant collection required. Prerequisite: one year of general biology or one semester of botany. (4 credits; 100 contact hours)
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP397
ACCA Shedd Aquarium:
Off campus courses offered by Judson University at the Shedd Aquarium with agreement of the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA).
Faculty consent required.
Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP398
ACCA Symposium:
Off campus courses offered by Judson College with agreement of the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA).
See Dr J. Henderson for details - regular tuition is charged Lower level courses offered as SAP298.
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 13.00
SAP494
Au Sable Institute:
Selected courses offered through Judson University at AuSable Institue of Environmental Studies. Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the AuSable Institute web site (ausable.org). Courses offered: Insect Ecology of Streams, Forests and Fields; Environmental Law and Policy; Field Biology in Spring; Tropical Agriculture and Missions; Conservation & Development in the Indian Tropics; Animal Ecology; Conservation Biology; Land Resources; Environmental Applications in GIS; Lake Ecology and Management; Restoration Ecology; Watersheds in Global Development; Alpine Ecology; Ecological Agriculture; International Development & Environmental Sustainability; Marine Biology; Marine Mammals; Forest Ecology;
Contact Dr. Henderson for details.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP496
ACCA Morton Arboretum:
Appropriate courses in botany offered by Judson College at the Morton Arboretum with agreement of the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA).
See Dr D. Hoferer for details - regular tuition is charged. Lower level courses offered as SAP196/296/396.
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 12.00
SAP498
ACCA Symposium:

Faculty consent required.
Hours: 12.00
SCM120
Conservation Education
This course provides students with environmental/earth science concepts, background and application with interdisciplinary concepts to support Illinois academic standards. Students also receive training in outdoor education techniques for teaching environmental education. This course is intended for early childrood majors only.
Meets one week prior to session.
Co-requisites: EDU324 OR EDU308X
Every Fall Semester Hours: 2.00
SCM181C
Concepts in Chemistry
This lab-science course is a study of the fundamental principles and processes in Chemistry, with an emphasis on explaining the properties of matter in terms of the structure and interactions of atoms and molecules. A familiarization of the scientific method through inquiry-based, active learning experiences and lab activities is provided in the course. Any two SCM181 courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Any two SCM181 courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Science/Math Fee: $70.00
Annually Hours: 2.00
SCM181E
Concepts in Earth/Space Science
This lab-science course is a study of the fundamental principles and processes in Earth Science and Astronomy such as objects in the sky, changes in earth and sky, structure of the earth system and earth in the solar system. A familiarization of the scientific method through inquiry-based, active learning experiences and lab activities is provided in the course. Any two SCM courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Any two SCM181 courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Science/Math Fee: $70.00
Annually Hours: 2.00
SCM181L
Concepts in Life Science
This lab-science course is a study of the fundamental principles and processes in the Life Sciences such as the nature of life, evolutionary theory, environmental science, human biology, and genetics. A familiarization of the scientific method through inquiry-based, active learning experiences and lab activities is provided in the course. Any two SCM181 courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Any two SCM181 courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Science/Math Fee: $70.00
Annually Hours: 2.00
SCM181P
Concepts in Physics
This lab-science course is a study of the fundamental principles and processes in Physics such as properties, types, and interactions of matter and energy, motions and forces, waves and light, electricity and magnetism. A Familiarization of the scientific method through inquiry-based, active learning experiences and lab activities is provided in the course. Any two SCM181 courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Any two SCM181 courses taken together may be used as science/mathematics general education credit on majors other than SCM.
Science/Math Fee: $70.00
Annually Hours: 2.00
SCM219
Sophomore Science Seminar
An introduction to the integration of Science with the Christian Faith. This course will explore a variety of historical and current issues arising at the intersection of Faith and Science. Students will learn how various Christian Scientist have answered the questions themselves and will practice defining and describing their own positions and responses to these issues through writing. Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
SCM319
Junior Science Seminar
An integrative course designed to explore issues between science and Christian faith related to the study of the origin of the universe and man. Students will explore responses to these issues from modern Christians and scientist and develop their own position. Students will further reflect on how the Judson experience is shaping them as whole persons and preparing them to shape the world as future scientists.
Junior status.
Pre-requisites: SCM219
Every Spring Semester Hours: 1.00
SCM419
Senior Science Seminar
An integrative capstone course designed to assist students in their transition to the professional world. The course includes assessment of skills necessary for success in graduate and professional schools and in the workplace, portfolio and resume development, presentations by alumni and other professionals, and discussion of current topics in science and the integration of science and Christian faith. Required for graduation of students majoring in Science-Math General, Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Science. Every Fall Semester Hours: 1.00
SOC151
Introduction to Sociology
(IAI S7900) Reviews principles, concepts, history and major approaches to the study of society. Students will examine the influence of culture, social structure, socialization, group life, social class and other social influences. Hours: 3.00
SOC215X
Marriage and the Family
The course covers contemporary courtship, marriage and family behavior; factors in dating, marriage and interaction, and counseling instruments.
Cross-listed as PSY215X
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
SOC221X
Adolescent Culture
Focuses on the spiritual, psychological and social problems confronting adolescents, and on learning to adapt old paradigms in order to reach individuals and groups both outside and within a Christian environment.
Cross-listed as YMN221X
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
SOC225X
Introduction to Child Advocacy
This course is the introductory course for child advocacy studies. This course covers the history, comparative perspectives, the legal framework, responses to child maltreatment, the skills necessary to do the work, other pertinent issues pertaining to child maltreatment and child advocacy, and the future. The field of child maltreatment is fraught with controversy. Much of the class focuses on these controversies. The approach of the course will be from a variety of diverse, professional perspectives including the perspectives of a prosecuting attorney versus a defense attorney. The course is designed for students majoring in sociology, psychology, criminal justice, education, ministry, or other areas where knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children might be necessary.
Cross-listed with PSY225X.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 & SOC151
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
SOC227X
Adult Development and Aging
An introduction to the field of gerontology and its approaches to the social, psychological, and physical concerns of aging. A special concern will be aging well in later life. Includes personal exposure to the aged and their environment, and consideration of ministries among the aged as viable vocational options.
Instructor may override prereq Cross-listed as PSY227X
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR SOC151
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
SOC255
Social Problems
(IAI S7 901) This course is designed to examine how culture, social structure, and social processes contribute to the creation of problems in society. Various strategies and interventions used to solve the different social problems are reviewed and evaluated.
Pre-requisites: SOC151
Hours: 3.00
SOC281
Principles and Practices of Human Services
An examination of three functions of human services (casework, group work and community organization) and exposure to local human services agencies. Includes presentations by agency staff members and visits to facilities. Students also explore options for licensure/certification in the human services field and are introduced to professional issues (working with diverse populations, professional ethics) Hours: 3.00
SOC296
Sociology Internship I
A supervised experience designed and tailored by the student and the program's coordinator. Requires placement in clinic, agency, residential facility, school or appropriate equivalent.
Pre-requisites: SSC281
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
SOC322X
Social Psychology
Reviews psychological principles and underlying social behavior; social perception, interpersonal relations, motivation formation, change, and assessment of attitudes, values, and beliefs; conformity and non conformity; and social interaction in small groups, role theory, leadership, organizational behavior, and change.
Cross-listed as PSY322X
Pre-requisites: PSY111
Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
SOC330X
Gender, Self, and Society
An overview of theories of development of sex differences as well as gender as a social construction. This course will emphasize feminist theory as applied to different areas of social and psychological development, such as personality traits, aggression, achievement, cognitive ability, and relationships. Students will examine their personal experiences related to gender in light of the course content and Christian faith.
Cross-listed as PSY330X
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
SOC353
Urban Sociology
Investigates urban development of cities as structures of life in industrial societies and of urbanization as a process of social changes. Patterns of residence and group interaction, of family and neighborhood relations, and of work and leisure serve as focal points.
Pre-requisites: SOC151
Hours: 3.00
SOC355
Cultural Diversity
Studies diverse lifestyles, values, socio-economic classes, ethnic, racial and immigrant backgrounds, and their social significance. Hours: 3.00
SOC391X
Statistics and Research Design
Gives rationale, assumptions and applications of experimental designs and statistical techniques used in analysis of research data; measures of central tendency, normal distribution, probability, linear regression, correlations, chi square, t tests and analysis of variance; and models based on anthropological, psychological and sociological experiments.
Cross-listed as PSY391X
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Pre-requisites: PSY111 OR SOC151
Every Fall Semester Hours: 4.00
SOC410
Family Theories
This course will give a foundational understanding of the major theories involved in family studies and how those theories lead to different definitions of 'family.' Theories to be covered include exchange theory, symbolic interaction, conflict theory, family life cycle, and family systems theory. Students will be introduced to the subdiscipline of family psychology and the profession and discipline of family therapy. Students will also begin to develop 'a theology of family.' Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
SOC451
Social Theories
An overview of the study of sociological theories, with an emphasis on current perspectives within the field of sociology and the lack of consensus. Social theories seek to explain why people act and organize themselves in certain ways. A variety of theories, both classical and contemporary, will be covered, with an analysis of each theory's strengths and weaknesses. This course will also foster a deeper understanding of contemporary social life.
Pre-requisites: SOC151
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
SOC496
Sociology Internship II
A supervised experience designed and tailored by the student and the program's coordinator. Requires placement in clinic, agency, residential facility, school or appropriate equivalent.
Pre-requisites: SOC281
Faculty consent required.
On demand Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
SPC120
Foundations of Speech
(IAI C2900) A basic course which utilizes a series of structured and evaluated classroom speaking experiences. The student will be exposed to a variety of the most common interpersonal communication and public speaking situations. Every Semester Hours: 3.00
SPC220
Oral Interpretation/Literature
Gives guidance and experience in reading poetry and prose to elicit the author's intended reaction from an audience.
Pre-requisites: SPC120
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
SPC221
Speech Tech for Broadcast Media
Includes the principles and techniques of preparing and delivering radio and video scripts.
Instructor may override prereq
Pre-requisites: SPC120
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
SPC321
Persuasion
The primary focus is effective strategies for public persuasion. Students examine the public media (print and electronic) for techniques of audience attention and motivation. Several speaking situations are required.
Pre-requisites: SPC120
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
SPC322
Group Discussion
A study of strategies and techniques for effective small group communication. This course focuses on interaction in task-oriented and decision-making groups and on leadership style and conflict resolution.
Pre-requisites: SPC120
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
SPC323
Advanced Public Speaking
This course builds upon the basics of theory and practice presented in SPC 120. Research methods, various world views, and historical foundations that contribute to modern Christians' understanding of the communication process in relation to presentations are examined.
Pre-requisites: SPC120
Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
SPC325
Storytelling
Storytelling has strong links to Oracy. The purpose of this course is to develop the understanding of story and the skills to create and perform storytelling. Students will analyze the components of narrative communication while they develop verbal and nonverbal skills through the experience of personal performance. Creativity and imagination will be explored and applied by adapting written stories and through original story development. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
SPC330
Speaking the Faith
Communicating the content of the Christian faith in creative and effective verbal-driven forms is a challenging task. Our course will explore fundamental aspects of public speaking at an advanced level with a focus on sharing faith stories, beliefs and experiences. The student will prepare and share multiple forms of formal spoken presentations including a personal testimony, biblical narrative, lay sermon and persuasive argument related to a current events topic. Our goal is to build confidence, precision and poise in sharing faith related content through verbal channels of communication. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
SPC330H
Speaking the Faith - Honors
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
SPN101
Introduction to Spanish I
The purpose of this class is to establish a basic foundation for learning the Spanish language. Students will work on vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, reading, and conversational skills. Hours: 3.00
THE155
Production
Covers elements of technical production, equipment, construction and backstage organization. The majority of the coursework consists of set construction on the current main stage offering. This course will count towards applied hours. Every Semester Hours: 1.00
THE175
Acting I
A foundational study of acting technique through improvisation, monologue and scripted scenes. Emphasis on physical and vocal awareness, fundamentals of the Stanislavski 'system,' and the relationship of acting to Christian spirituality. Open to all students. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
THE181
Theatre Appreciation
An examination of technical and artistic elements designed to provide the student with an understanding of and identity with the language of theatre. Field trips to a play. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
THE362
Directing for Stage and Video
Methods and techniques of directing for the stage and video. Emphasis on developing the student's ability to direct for specific audiences.
Instructor may override prereqs
Pre-requisites: THE175
On demand Hours: 3.00
THE365X
Plays That Shaped Western World
In this 12-week course, students will be exposed to drama writtten from the Greek era through the 20th century. They will learn how the playwrights changed our culture and society through their works. They will formulate their opinions and views of the plays through various papers and projects.
Cross-listed with ENG365X.
Student must be at Junior or Senior standing (at least 60 hours earned) when the class begins. All others will be dropped from the class without instructor's authorization.
Fall, Spring & Summer Hours: 3.00
THE465X
Shakespeare: Plays and Performance
The course will implement traditional and contemporary theories used in the study of Shakespeare to develop the broadest and deepest sense of the large body of his work. Through an examination of Shakespeare's life and times, the course will enable an understanding of his significance to drama, literature, and thought reaching far beyond his life and times. In that vein, this course will address Harold Bloom's bold contention that Shakespeare invented the basic ideas that we now use to define ourselves as human beings.
Cross-listed with ENG465X
Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
THS221
Christian Theology
An overview of the craft of Christian theology including its nature, task and methods, through exploring the various ways Christians have formulated, developed and interrelated the main doctrines of their faith.
Pre-requisites: BST101 & BST102
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
THS223
Environmental Theology
An exploration of the biblical and theological teachings concerning the relationships between Good and nature, including the role of humankind. Major theological doctrines will be considered from an environmental standpoint, including creation, sin, incarnation, redemption, love, and grace. the course will explore the ethical implications of the biblical teachings that creation belongs to and glorifies God, and how God's people are called to care for and relate to the rest of creation.us
Pre-requisites: BST101 & BST102
On demand Hours: 3.00
THS225X
History and Theology of Worship
The people of God have chosen to worship God in many ways through time. We will identify major components of Christian worship. Consideration will be given to the meaning and purpose of worship in general, and then we will linger over the Christian use of time, space, music, prayer, sharing God's Word, and rituals of various kinds. Insights from expressions of various historical periods and the theological implications of these practices will be included in our exploration. We will conclude our study with an overview of some ethnically diverse worship practices, African-American, Caribbean, and Latino/a, from a North American perspective.
Cross-listed as WOR225X
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
THS320X
History of Christianity to 1500
This examines the history of Christianity from the end of the New Testament to the beginnings of the Reformation. It was during this time that Christianity was the social, intellectual, political, economic and cultural engine of the Western world. The course will explore popular beliefs and how Christianity interacted with other cultural developments. Students will familiarize themselves with such events and trends as the formation of the biblical canon, the controversies surrounding the early councils, monasticism, scholasticism, and the rise the Papacy.
Cross-listed as HIS320X.
Hours: 3.00
THS321X
The Church and the Reformation
Reviews institutional expressions of the Christian faith; development of medieval forms; causes of the Reformation; and review of German, Swiss, English, Radical, and Catholic Reformations.
Cross-listed as HIS321X.
Hours: 3.00
THS325
Christology
Explores the central Christian doctrine of the person of Christ, engaging students to examine a fundamental Christian Belief in contextual perspective (historical, social, philosophical and missional).
Pre-requisites: THS221
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
THS330
Theology of Work
This course equips students with the skills required for analyzing and reinterpreting 'secular' realities from a Christian point of view and for discerning the spiritual and ethical dimensions of these. Specifically it enables students to develop their skills in constructive Christian theological thinking pertaining to the meaning, purpose, value and limitation of ordinary human work within God's economy, by identifying and engaging with issues arising there from; including such issues as work/vocation choice and the will of God, and how Christians in various work situations can live out their vocation from God. Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
THS391
Philosophers and Theologians in Dialogue
An interdisciplinary study of one or more seminal ideas and intellectual problems (e.g. the problem of evil, free-will and determinism...) from the unique but related perspective of selected theologians and philosophers. Fall, odd years Hours: 3.00
THS435
Studies in Contemporary Theology
an in-depth exploration of the theology of one (or more) contemporary theologian(s) whose constructive proposals are shaping the current theological agenda and promises to be of lasting significance to the Christian faith/Church in her engagement with the culture and society. This course mainly reads primary text materials, but influential secondary texts and interpreters will also be considered.
Pre-requisites: THS221
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
THS437
Studies in Historical Theology
An in-depth exploration of the theology of one (or more) historical theologian(s) whose constructive proposals have both set the theological agenda and proven to be of lasting importance to the Christian faith/Church in her engagement with the culture and society. This course mainly reads primary text materials, but influential secondary texts and interpreters will also be considered.
Pre-requisites: THS221
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
THS485X
Research Seminar
This course is the senior capstone for students with majors in the Biblical and Theological Studies department. Building upon the advanced research, writing and revising skills gained throughout the program, students will undertake research and under faculty supervision produce a thesis of between 10,000 and 12,000 words which offers a sustained and constructive response to an issue(s) raised within the field of biblical or theological studies. Students will present and defend their research conclusions to a group of their peers and other faculty.
Cross-listed as THS485X
On demand Hours: 3.00
WOR142
Bas Audio/Video Prod for Worship
Basic Audio/Video Production for Worship will examine the rudiments of sound reinforcement, lighting, and projection, particularly as they are used in the contemporary church. Students will receive hands-on training on state-of-the-art equipment and classroom lectures from instructors that have been in the production field, both in and out of the Church, for many years. Fall, even years Hours: 3.00
WOR152
Worship Band Fundamentals
A systematic study of the components of popular music, especially as they relate to contemporary Christian music and its subset, contemporary worship music. Students will review the fundamentals of melody, harmony, and rhythm; learn chord charts and lead sheets; and study the instrumental and vocal techniques featured in contemporary worship bands. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
WOR201
Worship Resources
A survey of resources available to aid and enhance worship experiences. Topics covered include materials for praise bands and other music teams, worship software, multimedia production tools, and drama curriculums. Students will create worship experiences in class and for the college community as part of their application of the materials presented in class. Fall, odd years Hours: 2.00
WOR225X
History and Theology of Worship
The people of God have chosen to worship God in many ways through time. We will identify major components of Christian worship. Consideration will be given to the meaning and purpose of worship in general, and then we will linger over the Christian use of time, space, music, prayer, sharing God's Word, and rituals of various kinds. Insights from expressions of various historical periods and the theological implications of these practices will be included in our exploration. We will conclude our study with an overview of some ethnically diverse worship practices, African-American, Caribbean, and Latino/a, from a North American perspective.
Cross-listed as THS225X
Pre-requisites: BST101 & BST102
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
WOR302
Worship and the Arts
Humanity is created in the image of God. A part of what this means is that the creativity and imagination that God uses in creation is rooted in our nature and being. We will examine many ways that people have sought to celebrate the Holy God, through Christ, by the Holy Spirit, through expressions of the arts in worship. Topics we will explore include the visual arts, the environment for worship, movement and postures for worship, world music, and the use of multi-media resources (for example, using video and film in worship). We will develop criteria for guiding us as we select expressions and explore practical ways of incorporating artistic offerings in worship.
Pre-requisites: WOR225X
Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
WOR303
Designing/Facilitating Worship
Christian worship is central to the life of the church. Worship is complex and changing as people of different ages, geographical locations, faith traditions, and cultures come together to honor and glorify God. In order to best serve our faith communities, we will need to understand our role of worship leader, grasp the ways in which our vocation impacts our larger community, and prepare for implementing worship renewal in North America. Through the consideration of numerous resources and shared conversations, we will endeavor to prepare for designing and facilitating worship in a variety of Christian traditions.
Pre-requisites: WOR225X & WOR152
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
WOR320
Songwriting for Contemp Worship
This course prepares students to analyze, critique, and write songs in the praise and worship genre utilized in contemporary worship.
Pre-requisites: MUS151
Spring, even years Hours: 3.00
WOR395
Worship Arts Practicum
A forty hour practical experience under the guidance of a pastor or para-church professional in order to gain experience in developing and producing worship experiences for a local church or para-church ministry.
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 0.00
WOR491
Senior Seminar: Issues in Contemporary Worship
This course serves as the capstone experience for Worship Arts majors, helping them to synthesize and integrate the work that they have done throughout their Worship Arts curriculum. Spring, odd years Hours: 3.00
WOR495
Worship Arts Internship
A 120-hour practice experience under the guidance of a pastor or para-church professional in order to gain experience in developing and producing worship experiences for the local church or para-church ministry.
Faculty consent required.
On demand Hours: 3.00
Study Abroad Program Undergraduate 2017-2018
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
SAP300
Chicago Semester: Arts and the City
This Seminar seeks to develop students' critical thinking skills through exposure to weekly art events that vary both in type (drama, dance, music, visual art, performance art, and poetry) and size (mainstream events like the Art Institute and Chicago Shakespeare and out-of-the-way ones like the Dance Center of Columbia College and the Hothouse's Backyard Variety Show). Small-group discussions and frequent in-class speakers encourage students not only to enjoy the art they experience, but to evaluate and better understand it. Creativity exercises offer an experiential opportunity for students to broaden their understanding in a hands-on way while the final art project helps students explore their own creativity by engaging an issue or problem encountered during the semester (personal, spiritual, social, philosophical, religious, etc.) through the medium of artistic expression. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP303
Chicago Semester: History of Religion and Society in Urban America
This course examines religious social engagement in urban America through the lens of history. We'll focus on the 20th Century and consider a range of issues, including industrialism, immigration, race relations, and gender roles. Throughout we'll use stories from the past to ask ourselves persistent questions. How do religious rituals and beliefs impact our private and public lives? Does faith inform racial divides? How should religion and the city be connected? The course will include lectures, discussions, field trips, and reading and writing assignments. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP306
Chicago Semester: History of Values and Vocation Seminar
This seminar welcomes students and instructor into a semester-long conversation about modern work and American culture. We will explore different forces shaping our working lives, including gender roles, social position, and the power of corporations. Tossing caution to the wind, we'll think big, trying not only to understand these forces and our response to them, but also probing for deeper theological meaning. In the end, the professor will invite (read: require) students to formulate a vocational vision for their lives. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP309
Chicago Semester: History of Metropolitan Seminar
In this seminar, we explore the contradictions in a city that is positioning itself as a hub in the global economy, while striving to respect its racial and cultural diversity. Metropolitan Seminar makes use of the city as a laboratory, investigating the trends and social conditions facing its residents and workers. The seminar explores these issues through neighborhood tours, field trips and presentations from guest speakers who present a variety of insights and perspectives. The seminar explores the future of urbanized society, and presents policy options for its future residents. At the heart of the course is the belief that the city, with its problems and possibilities, still has the potential to become the 'good city', even the city of God, depending on how willing its leaders and citizens are to confront the problems we face--problems that are society's not just Chicago's. The city is at once good, fallen, yet also capable of redemption. This theology is the implicit curriculum of the course. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information. the glob
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Hours: 12.00
SAP312
Chicago Semester: Practicum
Once a week, you'll join in a small group to discuss your internship and the city. You'll meet weekly for an hour and a half in a group that brings together students and different colleges and varying backgrounds. You'll also embark on neighborhood visits. Guided by a leader, your small group will tackle a range of topics from the city, to internships, to you. At its best, the group helps you find connections between these topics. To do that, it combines academic work (writing and critical analysis), informational reflection, and communal support. We begin by sharing autobiographies and move into a series of writing assignments and conversations that explore the power of place in shaping human experience, including ours. All the while, we keep tabs on each other to make sure no one gets lost in the rush of a big town, 3 million strong. This course is one of the seminar options for students attending the Chicago Semester Program. See www.chicagosemester.org for more details. Contact Dr. Kaplowitz for enrollment information.
Faculty consent required.
Every Fall and Spring Minimum Hours: 4.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP391
Au Sable Institute (Biol 345): Wildlife Ecology
Ecology, conservation, and stewardship of wildlife species and their habitats. Includes growth and structure of natural and managed populations, environmental and human social factors affecting wildlife communities, and wildlife conservation. The course is set in the context of historical development of field from management, to ecology, and the land ethic of Leopold. Includes management and stewardship of non-game and endangered species, and long-term prospects of wildlife in changing environmental, climatic, and social contexts. Prerequisite: one course in biology, or permission of professor.
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP392
AuSable Institute (Biol 322): Aquatic Biology/Great Lakes
Ecology, identification, systematics, culture, and care of aquatic plants and animals, and adaptations to freshwater environments. Aquatic life is studied in lakes, ponds, bogs, marshes, streams, and in the laboratory. The course assesses human impacts on aquatic species and ecosystems, presents procedures for the stewardship of aquatic habitats, and introduces aquatic restoration ecology. Prerequisite: one year of general biology or one semester each of general zoology and general botany. (4-credits; 100 contact hours)
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP393
Au Sable Institute (Chem 332): Environmental Chemistry
Principles, analysis, and impact of chemical movement and distribution - both natural and human-induced - in natural environments focusing primarily on the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Sampling and analytical methods are included for water, soil, and air. Work is conducted both on site in natural habitats and the laboratory. Prerequisite: one year of general chemistry and one semester of either biochemistry or organic chemistry. (4-credits; 100 contact hours)
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP395
Au Sable Inst (Biol/Geog 311): Field Botany
Field and lab identification, systematics, natural history, and ecology of vascular plants as components of natural communities. Ecological features, including stratification, history, plant zonation, adaptation, and animal interactions are examined. Relationships of plant families and higher groups are covered. Project and/or plant collection required. Prerequisite: one year of general biology or one semester of botany. (4 credits; 100 contact hours)
Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies web site (ausable.org).
The student must print a petition from the Au Sable Web Site(ausable.org), complete it and bring it to the Registrar's office forregistration.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP397
ACCA Shedd Aquarium:
Off campus courses offered by Judson University at the Shedd Aquarium with agreement of the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA).
Faculty consent required.
Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP398
ACCA Symposium:
Off campus courses offered by Judson College with agreement of the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA).
See Dr J. Henderson for details - regular tuition is charged Lower level courses offered as SAP298.
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 13.00
SAP400
Austria: Alderson-Broaddus Prog
Travel and study for a semester in Europe at the Salzburg, Austria campus of Alderson-Broaddus College. Courses (12-18 semester hours) taught by by both American and European professors include the following; Conversational German, European Culture, Special Issues, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Business and Education. Offered in the fall semester only.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP403
London: Architectural Assoc.

Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP404
Architecture Institute in Prague
ARCHIP provides a unique study environment where faculty and students cooperate at an arms length. While retaining their academic authority the lecturers provide the students with partner-like guidance, which allows the students to not limit their creative thinking and come up with extra-ordinary output, which is relevant to real world architecture thanks to the actual experience of the academic leadership. Minimum Hours: 2.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP405
Australia: Wesley Inst Music/Art
Wesley Institute is Australia's premier Christian college of the arts and theology. The program offers students the unique opportunity to earn professional qualifications in a creative, dynamic and supportive environment. Local Christian families provide housing for the 15-week semester. Contact Person: Amy Schrepfer, ext. 1160
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP409
UCD: University College Dublin Ireland

Faculty consent required.
Hours: 12.00
SAP410
American Studies Program
Founded in 1976, the American Studies Program has served hundreds of students from member institutions as the 'Washington, DC campus.' ASP uses Washington as a stimulating educational laboratory where collegians gain hands-on experience with an internship in their chosen field. Internships are tailored to fit the student's talents and are available in a wide range of fields. They also explore pressing national and international issues in public policy seminars which are issue-oriented, interdisciplinary and led by ASP faculty and Washington professionals. ASP bridges classroom and marketplace, combining biblical reflection, policy analysis and real-world experience. Students are exposed to on-the-job learning that helps them build for the future and gain perspective on the calling of God for their lives. They are challenged in a rigorous course of study to discover for themselves the meaning of Christ's lordship in putting their beliefs into practice. The aim of the program is to help Council schools prepare their students to live faithfully in contemporary society as followers of Christ. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Jim Halverson, ext. 1123
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP415
China Studies Program
The China Studies Program enables students to engage this large and intriguing country from the inside. While living and experiencing Chinese civilization firsthand, students participate in seminar courses on the historical, cultural, religious, geographical and economic realities of this strategic and populous nation. In addition to the study of standard Chinese, students are given opportunities such as assisting Chinese students learning English or working in an orphanage, allowing for one on one interaction. The program introduces students to the diversity of China, including Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, Xi'an and Xiamen. This interdisciplinary, cross cultural program of study enables students to deal with this increasingly important part of the world in an informed, Christ centered way. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Prof. Ted Hsieh, ext. 1124
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP417
China-Shokei Gakuin University

Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP420
Contemp Music - Brentwood TN
The Contemporary Music Program provides students the opportunity to live and work in a community while seeking to understand how God will have them integrate music, faith and business. Both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary in nature, the CMP offers two tracks: the Artist Track and the Executive Track. The Artist Track is tailored to students considering careers as vocalists, musicians, songwriters, recording artists, performers, producers and recording engineers. The Executive Track is designed for business, arts management, marketing, communications and other majors interested in possible careers as artist managers, agents, record company executives, music publishers, concert promoters and entertainment industry entrepreneurs. Both Artist and Executive track students receive instruction, experience and a uniquely Christian perspective on creativity and the marketplace, while working together to create and market a recording of original music. Both tracks include course work, labs, directed study and a practicum. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Chip Gross, ext. 1112
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP428
France: ENSA-Versailles
The Versailles study abroad program is suited to students who would like to study for the spring semester of the Junior year in architecture at Versailles, France. Study historic and contemporary architecture while immersed in French culture. French language skills are required for this elective program. Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP430
Focus on the Family Institute
The Focus on the Family Institute provides a unique educational community which nurtures emerging Christian leaders, equipping them to promote healthy families, vibrant churches and a civil society. The curriculum of this semester-long program is multidisciplinary and focuses on topics related to psychology, sociology, family studies, leadership, social ethics, public policy, philosophy and theology. Fall, spring and summer study opportunities are available. Contact Person: Amy Schrepfer, ext. 1160
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP431
Germany - Hochschule Anhalt (FH)
Architecture students at Judson are now provided with the unique opportunity of spending the summer in the city of Dessau, renowned as the center of the Bauhaus School. The main emphasis of the program is on the region's role in modern architecture. In addition to classroom and studio experiences, the program is enriched by excursions to local sites. The summer term opens with the conference, 'Production of Space', sponsored by Anhalt University and the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP432
Germany - University of Luneburg
The University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule Nordostniedersachsen) offers the SmiLE program (Semester in Lneburg English). It is an excellent opportunity to spend a semester studying at a small German university in a beautiful city full of tradition. Learn German and learn about todays Germany. Experience the language, the people, the culture, the history and earn college credits for doing it. The program begins with an intensive 2-week course in German language and culture that continues throughout the semester, and offers additional classes in Business and Management, European Commercial Law and Intercultural Communication.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP433
Harlaxton College in England
Harlaxton College, the British Campus of the University of Evansville, offers Judson students the opportunity to spend a semester studying in a magnificent nineteenth-century manor home. Field trips, seminars, lectures, extended travel weekends, and co-curricular opportunities will give students invaluable opportunities to immerse themselves in British culture. The curriculum at Harlaxton College is based around a six-credit course, the British Experience, which is taught by their British faculty. Harlaxton also offers a wide variety of additional classes taught by both British faculty and visiting faculty members. Harlaxton College is owned and operated by the University of Evansville.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP435
Hong Kong Baptist University
Judson College and Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) began an exchange program in 1998. Each fall semester, one student from Judson is guaranteed space in a new international residence hall at HKBU. Participation in the exchange is normally limited to juniors and seniors. Participants pay Judson tuition, board and room for the exchange semester. Judson pays direct costs to HKBU, reimburses up to $1,000 toward the cost of air fare, and refunds $500/month for four and a half months to be applied to meals and local transportation expenses. The application deadline is approximately four months before the beginning of the Hong Kong term; details are available from the Office of Academic Affairs.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP439
Spain: University Camilo Jose Cela (UCJC)
The Camilo Jose Cela University study abroad program is suited to students who would like to study for the spring semester of the Junior year in architecture in Madrid, Spain. Study historic and contemporary architecture while immersed in Spanish culture. Spanish language skills are required for this elective program.
Faculty consent required.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP440
Honours Programme-CMRS, Oxford
Honors and other highly qualified students have the exciting opportunity to study in England through an interdisciplinary semester at Oxford University. The rigorous academic program, aimed at increasing critical thinking skills and scholarship from an integrated Christian perspective, allows participants to choose from a wide variety of tutorial study programs in numerous disciplines, including the arts, religion, history, literature and philosophy. In addition to two tutorials, students participate in a seminar and an integrative course through which they produce a scholarly project or term paper. Field trips provide opportunities for experiential learning in England's rich historical setting. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Jim Halverson, ext. 1123
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP441
India Studies Program
Become immersed in a local Indian community while being exposed to the complex diversity of India's people, places and customs. With over 20 recognized languages, nine religions, and 2000 ethnic groups. The India Studies Program is your opportunity to encounter one of today's most fascinating and diverse cultures. Whether you're studying social work, theology, mission, art & design, communications, business, cultural studies, or social science, there is a place for you at the India Studies Program.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP445
Ichthus Hogeschool/Inholland
University of Professional Education, Rotterdam, Holland Faculty Coordinator: Prof. Del Rey Loven, ext. 1034 One semester of study in Business, Communications or Design, including one course in Dutch Language and Culture. Courses are taught in English. Students of any major may apply as early as sophomore year.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP450
Jerusalem University College
Located on Mt. Zion, adjacent to Jerusalem's Old City, this program offers credit for semester and year-long programs of study. Students study the history, language, culture, archeology and geography of biblical lands as they relate to biblical interpretation and a better understanding of the Middle East. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Michael McKeever, ext. 1054
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP455
Latin American Studies Program
Students of CCCU colleges have the opportunity to live and learn in Latin America through the Latin American Studies Program, based in San Jose, Costa Rica. The program introduces students to a wide range of experiences through the study of language, literature, culture, politics, history, economics, ecology and religion of the region. Living with a Costa Rican family, students experience and become a part of the day-to-day lives of typical Latin Americans. Students also take part in a service opportunity and travel for three weeks to nearby Central American nations. Students participate in one of four concentrations: Latin American Studies (offered both fall and spring terms); Advanced Language and Literature studies (limited to Spanish majors and offered both fall and spring Terms), International Business and Management (offered only in fall terms) and Tropical Sciences (offered only in spring terms). Students in all concentrations earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Jim Halverson, ext. 1123
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP456
Italy - Lorenzo de' Medici (LdM)
Over forty years of experience in higher education has made LdM one of the most distinctive and well-established study abroad institutions in Europe. LdM prides itself on offering academic and professionally-oriented courses designed to complement a variety of study abroad programs as well as enrich students' knowledge, education and skills. Students can choose from over 400 different courses in 34 subject areas, which are taught in English at LdM's three locations: Florence, Rome, and Tuscania. Courses fall under four main academic divisions: Arts and Sciences, Creative Arts, Design, and Italian Language and Culture. Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP460
Los Angeles Film Studies Center
The Los Angeles Film Studies Center is designed to train students of Council institutions to serve in various aspects of the film industry with both professional skill and Christian integrity. Students live, learn and work in the Los Angeles area near major studios. The curriculum consists of two required seminars focusing on the role of film in culture and the relationship of faith to work in this very influential industry. In addition, students choose two elective courses from a variety of offerings in film studies. Internships in various segments of the film industry provide students with hands on experience. The combination of the internship and seminars allow students to explore the film industry within a Christian context and from a liberal arts perspective. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Prof. Paul Mouw, ext. 1070
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP462
New York Center Art and Media Studies

New York - New York Center for Art and Media Studies at the New York Center for Art and Media Studies (NYCAMS), the city will be your classroom. NYCAMS, a program of Bethel College is located within walking distance from some of the most prestigious galleries and museums in the world; these extraordinary cultural resources will be an integral aspect of your learning experience. In addition, internships with internationally renowned artists and institutions will provide you with unique opportunities to experience and engage professionally with the arts. (material taken from nycams.bethel.edu)
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP465
Middle East Studies Program
This program based in Cairo, Egypt, allows Council students to explore and interact with the complex and strategic world of the modern Middle East. The interdisciplinary seminars give students the opportunity to explore the diverse religious, social, cultural and literary traditions of Middle Eastern people. In addition to seminars, students study the Arabic language and work as volunteers with various organizations in Cairo. Through travel to Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Syria and Turkey, students are exposed to the diversity and dynamism of the region. The MESP encourages and equips students to relate to the Muslim world in an informed, constructive and Christ-centered manner at a time of tension and change. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Robert Erickson, ext. 1051
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP468
Scholars' Semester in Oxford Psychology
Psychology has been taught in Oxford since the nineteenth century. SCIO's psychology courses offer advanced psychology students the chance to explore the analytical, philosophical, and theoretical bases of their subject, as well as its history and its influence on literature.Courses do not include laboratory work, clinical work, or classes on statistics, research design, or othertechnical matters. Students attend lectures in the Department of Experimental Psychology and work inOxford's extensive libraries in psychology and related subjects to further their understanding of variousapproaches to the subject, which might include its philosophical underpinnings, and its wider cultural andreligious applications.
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP470
Oxford Summer Programme
This program allows students to spend a summer term studying at the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS) in Oxford, England. The program includes multidisciplinary study of the Renaissance and Reformation through examination of philosophy, art, literature, science, music, politics and religion of early modern Europe in a choice of lectures, seminars and field trips. Students earn 69 semester credits, which are administered directly to member institutions by CMRS. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Jim Halverson, ext. 1123
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP472
Rome Geneva College

Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP474
Russia St Petersburg Christian U

Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP475
Russian Studies Program
RSP students are exposed to the depth and diversity of the culture during a semester spent in Russia's three largest cities: Moscow, St. Petersburg and Nizhni Novgorod. In addition to three seminar courses entitled History and Sociology of Religion in Russia; Russian Peoples, Cultures and Literature; and Russia in Transition, students receive instruction in the Russian language, choosing either four or six semester hours of language coursework. For those choosing four hours of Russian, a seminar course entitled International Relations and Business in Russia is available. RSP strives to give students as wide an experience as possible in this complex nation, beginning with time in Moscow, the heart of both medieval and modern Russia. Students then spend 12 weeks in Nizhni Novgorod, a strategic city on the Volga River. After six weeks of language instruction, students live with a Russian family for the remainder of their stay in this city. Students also participate in a service opportunity in Nizhni Novgorod. The program concludes with a week spent in the complex and intriguing city of St. Petersburg, the Russian 'window to the West.' Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Jim Halverson, ext. 1123
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP480
Washington Journalism Center
Council campuses are invited to choose two student journalists to apply for this four week, all expenses paid experience in Washington, D.C. Fifteen students are selected to participate in the Institute, which lasts from mid-May to mid-June. The Institute blends classroom experience with hands on work and provides excellent opportunity to learn through lectures and panels with leading journalists who share a strong Christian commitment. Students also participate in seminars taught by communications professors from Council member institutions, take part in field trips, and complete workshop projects for hometown newspapers. SIJ provides valuable insight and training in gathering and writing news, editing copy and designing layout. The Institute develops students as Christian journalists - exhibiting both professionalism and legal/ethical integrity. Students earn 4 semester hours of credit. Faculty Coordinator: Prof. Paul Mouw, ext. 1070
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP485
Semester in Spain
Since 1977, this program has advanced international education. Located in Seville, Spain, the program is designed to provide a rich academic and cultural experience, as well as foster lasting relationships between the students and hosts. It combines challenging academic study and opportunities for students to practice what they are learn. Courses are offered at beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels for the spring and fall semesters. Contact Person: Amy Schrepfer, ext. 1160
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP487
Spring Semester in Thailand
Every Spring Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP490
Japan-Tokyo Christian University

Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Minimum Hours: 3.00
Maximum Hours: 1.00
SAP494
Au Sable Institute:
Selected courses offered through Judson University at AuSable Institue of Environmental Studies. Regular tuition is charged plus fees for travel including room and board as posted on the AuSable Institute web site (ausable.org). Courses offered: Insect Ecology of Streams, Forests and Fields; Environmental Law and Policy; Field Biology in Spring; Tropical Agriculture and Missions; Conservation & Development in the Indian Tropics; Animal Ecology; Conservation Biology; Land Resources; Environmental Applications in GIS; Lake Ecology and Management; Restoration Ecology; Watersheds in Global Development; Alpine Ecology; Ecological Agriculture; International Development & Environmental Sustainability; Marine Biology; Marine Mammals; Forest Ecology;
Contact Dr. Henderson for details.
Faculty consent required.
Every Summer Hours: 12.00
SAP495
Uganda Studies Program
'Be the minority and encounter a world you've never seen before. On the USP you can marvel at everything from the majestic and endangered mountain gorillas to the Great Rift Valley. Witness an enthusiastic, urgent Christianity as it explodes across the continent. See a Ugandan government, new and growing, becoming an example of successful reform. Open your eyes to nature, spirit and society in the raw.' (material taken from Best Seminar literature.)
Faculty consent required.
Every Semester Hours: 12.00
SAP496
ACCA Morton Arboretum:
Appropriate courses in botany offered by Judson College at the Morton Arboretum with agreement of the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA).
See Dr D. Hoferer for details - regular tuition is charged. Lower level courses offered as SAP196/296/396.
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 12.00
SAP498
ACCA Symposium:

Faculty consent required.
Hours: 12.00