Judson University Course Catalog
Index
1. Architecture, Art&Design 2. Business
3. Division of Education 4. Liberal Arts


Architecture, Art&Design Graduate 2018-2019
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
ARC522
Environmental Technology III
A comprehensive overview of environmental systems that serve large buildings including HVAC, electrical transportation, communication and water systems. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC531
History of Architecture after the Industrial Revolution
Topics in the history of architecture starting in the Industrial Revolution and through another period of significant technological development, the Digital Age. Investigates various responses by architects to technological change, including aesthetics, construction materials and methods, means of communication, and professionalization, in the midst of social, religious, economic and political contexts in the period starting ca. 1750. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC532
Architecture of Cities
Topics in city- and landscape-making are investigated chronologically; long-standing cultural habits, political and religious representation, effects of the modern economy, American suburbanization, and Western intellectual history for the city. Major attention given to Western cities and landscapes, lesser to non-Western cities. Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC541
Adv Architectural Structures
Structural design and analysis of buildings, for architects, including steel, concrete, timber and long-span structures. Applications of concepts of tension/compression, bending and shear stress, combined stresses, structural connections, load resolution, member sizing and wind loading on multi-story buildings. Course content addresses traditional as well as current techniques, applications, materials and methods for designing structural solutions. Every Spring Semester Hours: 4.00
ARC552
Integrative Architectural Design Studies II
Advanced integrated architectural design thinking and making with particular considerations of building envelope, environmental systems, life safety, accessibility, conveyance, and sit in the shaping of public oriented building type.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Every Spring Semester Hours: 5.00
ARC556
Architectural Practice, Leadership and Ethics
An introduction to and survey of the professional practice of architecture. Course content includes a reflection upon the Preceptorship program, a survey of the history of professional practice, a review of the policies of NCARB, IDP, local and national AIA, a familiarization with the various routes to licensure, exposure to a variety of practice types and career paths within the board context of professional practice. Every Summer Hours: 2.00
ARC575
Community Outreach Studio
Advanced design studio positioning community outreach and Christian engagement as a vehicle for environmental and social justice.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Every Summer Hours: 4.00
ARC580
Programming and Research Methodsin Architecture
This course is an introduction to architectural programming, project scheduling, cost estimating, and case study research. Students will produce a research and program compendium in preparation for the Cumulative Studio or Thesis project. Every Summer Hours: 4.00
ARC581
Architectural Study Tour
Observe and analyze selected European urban sites and architecture using various methods and media. Visits to museums may be included. On-site design project may be featured.
This course has a supply fee of $100.00 and a trip/travel fee of $5,600.00. Please attend informational meetings for itinerary, required preparations and specific details.
Art/Design Fee: $100.00
Every Summer Hours: 5.00
ARC600
Topics in Architecture:
Customized courses dealing with specific topics not covered in the regular course offerings. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC600S
Topics in Sustainable Design:
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC600T
Topics in Traditional Architecture and Urbanism:
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC610
Advanced Digital Design I
Advanced Exploration of theories of digital design informing all stages of architectural production. Facilitate exploration into analytical, parametric, environmental and material dimensions of digital design in architecture. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC611
Adv Digital Representation II
This course extends the representational capabilities of the student through various means of web related media; as particularly related to the digital medias of modeling, graphic, and web systems. Students will explore communication and publication strategies through Internet and Intranet systems as they potentially relate to architectural practice. Students will visit offices in the region that utilize web resources in creative and critical ways, and become familiar with the different possibilities for digital architectural communication. Students will utilize Adobe Go-Live, Live Motion, Auto CAD 2000, Form-Z, Photoshop and Illustrator. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC616
Architectural Rendering in Watercolor
This course is intended to introduce the students to the history tools, and techniques of watercolor rendering as applied to architectural spaces. This is primarily a studio course, meaning that most of the time will be spent practicing rendering techniques, both in and out of class. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC625
Adv Architectural Acoustics
This course will consist of lectures, seminars, readings and field trips to large meeting rooms for speech and/or music, such as places of worship, theaters, concert halls, auditoriums. Students will work individually on the design of a class project, competition project or an actual building project by establishing acoustical design goals for different spaces in a building. The purpose of studying these themes of architectural acoustics is to learn how to make use of sonic and physical changes that enhance the quality of the built environment. Consequently, architectural acoustics studies and practice will include the topic of providing comfort and environmental protection to support human activities, through architectural forms that are aesthetically pleasing in the community and society at large. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC626
Daylighting in Architecture
The purpose of this course is to learn how to make use of visual and physical changes that enhance the quality of the built environment. The works of Aalto, Kahn, Mies, Wright, among others have controlled the sensory environmental qualities such as heat, light and sound to accentuate their design concepts. Architectural lighting studies and practice includes the task of providing comfort and environmental protection to support human activities, through architectural forms that are aesthetically pleasing in the community and society at large. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC627
Architecture for Conviviality
Students consider the warnings that industrialized objects, including buildings, tend to cause our disengagement. We will consider how buildings may have potential for building community and for enhancing engagement with created reality. All of us will be challenged to consider our faith-practice in the world described by contemporary philosophers, theorists, Christians, and critics. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC630
Chicago Arch After the Fire
Chicago's buildings, spaces and arteries, concentrating on the period following the Great Fire of 1872. Addresses issues of design, culture and technology; emphasizes Chicago's diverse architectural traditions, urban planning and promotion of sustainable design. Lecture/discussion; field trips.
Status as master's candidate in architecture of permission of instructor.
Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC632
History Arch Theory Seminar
Study of primary works of architectural theory from antiquity to the modern period, considering how each reflects its writer's culture and personal values, and informs his/her architectural design, and broader contemporary practice. Major thinkers (Vitruvius, Palladio, Laugier, Ruskin, Corbusier, etc.) and themes (the classical tradition, human analogy, materialism, morality, historicism) will knit together the chronological study. Historical values will be considered within a contemporary Christian world view. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC642
Advanced Architectural Drawing
This course is intended to build on the skills acquired in the prerequisite courses of ART111 Drawing I (sketching) and ARC122 Design II (drafting). Using a series of studio exercises and sketchbooks, it will expose the student to the intersection of these two types of drawing to develop a unique blend of controlled sketching with architectural sensibilities and conventions. The student will be introduced to the history tools and techniques of sketching as applied to architectural subjects. The use of black and white will be emphasized with limited exposure to color. The study of shades and shadow casting, or sciography, will also be covered in some detail. This class will be particularly useful to students who want to develop their drawing skills in preparation for Europe Study Tour or other travel experiences. Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC651
Advanced Architecture and Urbanism Studio
Advanced Studio involving the analysis of urban patterns at a variety of scales, investigates the contribution of building and site design to challenges in formal context, sustainability, urban regeneration, and the vitality of social systems.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 7.00
ARC652
Advanced Architecture Studio
Advanced studio offering elective variety to prepare students for design in contemporary practice: intense investigations include typology, tectonics, sustainability (design, materials, and systems), and context.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: ARC651
Every Spring Semester Hours: 7.00
ARC656
Architectural Practice, Law and Management
A seminar that continues the content of Professional Practice I, extending the subject into areas of law, ethics, regulation , professional registration, marketing, finance, business accounting, business structure, project delivery methods, contracts and client relations. Every Semester
Pre-requisites: ARC556
Every Fall Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC671
Advanced Case Studies in Sustainable Design
This course investigates contemporary approaches to sustainable design. Students gain an understanding of relationships between radical energy conservation and production measures including: politics of green design, design for passive, measuring and controlling energy and material movement, designing for renewable energy and site regeneration, life cycle implications of design, and post-occupancy assessment and retro-commissioning. Students gain critical practice knowledge, and complete the course prepared to understand green building design certification of various types (i.e. LEED, LBC, Cradle to Cradle, ect.) Varies Hours: 3.00
ARC681
Architecture Thesis Project I
The Architecture thesis makes an original, critical, and supported argument adding to the disciplinary discourse; original, meaning that the argument is unique and authored by the student; critical in that the investigation is advanced in the light of present scholarship, the history of architecture, and biblical wisdom; supported, meaning that the argument is defended intellectually and under girded by the student's research including case studies. The investigative medium may be writing or it may be design; however, the original and critical nature of an investigation by design must be articulated in words as must be the scholarly context and the supporting research. The proportion between written and design components may vary but the design portion must be substantive. The written and design components of the Thesis shall demonstrate excellence of high degree in scholarship, design, use of media, and presentation.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Every Fall Semester Hours: 7.00
ARC682
Architecture Thesis Project II
Continuation and completion of ARC681. Includes reviews by faculty committee as scheduled by committee chair, final presentation to committee and written documentation.
Arch/ID Program Fee: $950.00. The Architecture Program Fee is adifferential fee which applies to Architecture and Interior Designmajors, resulting from the unique expenses of these majors. The feeis applied to studio courses from second semester of freshman yearthrough graduate study. The Architecture Program Fees apply directlyto the specialized programming, technology, materials and physicalresources necessary to maintain the distinctive excellence of programsin the Department of Architecture.
Pre-requisites: ARC681
Every Spring Semester Hours: 7.00
ARC688
Directed Research/Architecture
Intensive research experience under the direction of an architecture faculty member. Directed research forms are available on the College website and must be approved by the Department Chair and the Graduate Dean.
Faculty consent required.
Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 6.00
ARC688S
Directed Research in SustainableDesign:

Faculty consent required.
Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 4.00
ARC688T
Directed Research in TraditionalArchitecture and Urbanism:

Faculty consent required.
Minimum Hours: 1.00
Maximum Hours: 4.00
ARC691
Christian Worldview and Architecture
The Worldview and Architecture Seminar presents the opportunity for a capstone critical study of worldview, of theological implications, and evangelical approaches, in the philosophy and practice of architecture. Every Spring Semester Hours: 3.00
ARC692
Architecture for Christian Worship
Humanity has chosen to worship the Triune God communally through the design and use of particular built environments. This class is designed to provoke critical reflection on how these spaces for worship have helped to articulate and shape people's understanding and experience of God. We will examine many different architectural expressions of worship space through time with an eye toward discerning how church buildings of the past may provide insight for church designs in the present and future. Varies Hours: 3.00
Business Graduate 2018-2019
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
BUS505
Business Analytics
Focuses on correct problem identification and employs the use of business statistics to make business recommendations.
You must be enrolled in a graduate program to register for this course.
Hours: 3.00
BUS510
Managerial Accounting
Course focuses on leaders' and managements' role in Managerial Accounting. The course covers topics that include managerial accounting and cost concepts, job-order and process costing, variable costing, activity based costing, profit planning, flexible budgets, standard costing, performance measurements, differential analysis, capital budgeting, statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: Foundational knowledge of accounting principles as typically acquired through an undergraduate course in accounting. Students who lack this academic background or have little working knowledge of the subject are directed to complete coursework or the accounting module of the MBATutor. Hours: 3.00
BUS520
Financial Management
Course will cover the basic issues in Financial Management of Organizations including the role of the Chief Financial Officer; Financial Staff Organization; Financial Statement analysis and use; Financial Forecasting; Working Capital and Current Asset Management; Sources of Financing, Long & Short Term; Time Value of Money; Capital Budgeting; Capital Markets; & International Financial Issues. Current developments in the overall environment will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Foundational knowledge of finance as typically acquired through an undergraduate course. Students who lack this academic background or have little working knowledge of the subject are directed to complete coursework or the finance module of the MBATutor. Hours: 3.00
BUS530
Operations/Project Management
Course will help students to gain an introduction to the field of Operations Management. Operations Management is the management of systems or processes that create goods and/or services to the end user. The operations discipline contains many activities such as forecasting, capacity planning, scheduling, job design, inventory management, facilities selection, and more. This course will cover the traditional subjects of Operations Management including Forecasting, Systems Design, and Inventory Management. This course will also cover the contemporary subjects of Operations Management including Quality Management, Supply Chain Management, and Project Management. Though none of these subjects will be covered exhaustively, for entire volumes have been written on each one, the student will receive a detailed overview appropriate to research the subject comprehensively. Having a comprehensive understanding of this subject, the student will be able to participate as a decisive leader in the operations management process in a business, social, and ethically moral way at all levels of a business organization whether at a for profit or non-profit organization. Hours: 3.00
BUS540
Marketing
Course focuses on the marketing function in organizational management. Students will learn to use the tools required to: Collect relevant data from the marketplaces their organization serves, critically analyze the data, and compose projective estimates of the organizations opportunities and challenges. Hours: 3.00
BUS550
Managerial Economics
Course will help students to 'think beyond stage 1'. Students will think beyond the immediate consequences of decisions implemented within and outside of a corporation to the long-term repercussions of those decisions, which are often different and longer lasting. Additionally, as many of the economic decisions managers will face are a direct result of politics and social policies, the interplay of 'government with economics' will be a recurring theme in this course. Prerequisite: Foundational knowledge of economics as typically acquired through an undergraduate course. Students who lack this academic background or have little working knowledge of the subject are directed to complete coursework or the economics module of the MBA Tutor. Hours: 3.00
BUS560
International Business
Hours: 3.00
BUS585
MBA Capstone
Hours: 3.00
BUS601
Business Strategies
Course will help students to understand the purpose and elements of effective business strategy. Hours: 3.00
BUS615
Current Issues in Business
Course enables the students to demonstrate analytical thinking that sharpens their insights, develops their existing capabilities, and fosters an appreciation for life-long learning. Hours: 3.00
HSA512
Do Not Use should be MHC512
In this course, students will reflect on their own interpersonal relational and leadership styles and gain a conscious awareness of their professional selves. Topics covered in this course include value clarification, conflict resolution, and developing self-care strategies for oneself and clients. Hours: 3.00
HSA522
Professional, Legal and Ethical Issues in Human Services
In this course, students will learn about ethics and legal standards in the human services field. Students will explore a personal ethical framework and apply it to their professional role in the field. They will also explore legal and ethical issues related to governing an organization. Hours: 3.00
HSA623
Human Services Program Planning,Delivery and Evaluation
This course examines how direct services are planned, implemented, funded, and evaluated. Topics covered include program analysis, funding, grant writing, program evaluation, and outcome measurement. Students will gain practical experience designing a program proposal and presenting the program plan to peers. Hours: 3.00
MHC501
Foundations of Mental Health Counseling
This course provides an overview of the historical, ethical, and clinical scopes of mental health counseling. This course also examines information related to professional practice in the mental health field, including settings and services, counselor roles and responsibilities, professional affiliations, and credentialing. Hours: 3.00
MHC504
Fundamentals of Human Services Counseling and Delivery Systems
This course provides a survey of the Human Services and Counseling professions. Course content includes the historical development of the field, including how legislation affects service delivery, roles in the field, and ethical issues. Hours: 3.00
MHC510
Human Growth and Lifespan Development
This course studies an integrative perspective of human growth and development. Course content explores how individuals develop from birth to older adulthood physically, cognitively, and emotionally, and examines how external factors impact development at all life stages. Students will develop strategies for assisting individuals at all life stages. Hours: 3.00
MHC515
Counseling Theory
This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of counseling theories and emphasizes application and integration of major theories. Students will not only critically analyze theories and develop a personal theory of counseling, but they apply theory with practice with case management simulation. Hours: 3.00
MHC516
Counseling Techniques
In this course, students will learn and practice essential counseling skills such as assessment, goal setting, intervention strategies, and evaluation of client outcomes. Students will also develop a counseling strategy and examine the role of helping relationships. Hours: 3.00
MHC517
Professional, Legal and Ethical Issues in Counseling
In this course, students will learn about ethics and legal standards in the counseling field. Students will explore a personal ethical framework and apply it to their professional role in the field. They will also examine legal and ethical standards of professional accrediting bodies. Hours: 3.00
MHC525
Counseling Practicum
The Counseling Practicum provides students with the first level of professional counseling exposure. In this course, students prepare to practice in the field within a highly supervised environment. Counseling practicums require 120 hours at a site agency, including a minimum of 40 hours of direct service with actual clients. Students will also meet together as a class to discuss professional development and debrief about experiences.
**Prereq: MHC542 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC542
Hours: 3.00
MHC527
Maladaptive Behaviors and Psychiatric Illness
This course provides an overview of psychopathology and maladaptive behaviors that occur across the lifespan. In this course students will define abnormality and underlying issues, identify symptoms and types of psychological disorders, study how cultural and social factors impact maladaptive behavior, and explore cultural stereotypes that impact access to direct services.
**Prereq: MHC516 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC516
Hours: 3.00
MHC529
Multicultural Counseling
This course equips students with the knowledge and skills to gain multicultural competency as professional counselors. Students will study various ethnic, social, and religious groups to gain an understanding of their cultural norms and determine whether counseling techniques and advocacy efforts should be adapted to suit the needs of diverse clientele. Students will also examine their own cultural framework in order to eliminate professional bias.
**Prereq: MHC516 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC516
Hours: 3.00
MHC532
Research and Evaluation Methods
This course examines research designs and methods with an emphasis on developing a critical approach to program planning and treatment methods within the clinical mental health counseling field. Topics covered include research tools, skills, and processes, hypothesis testing, statistical application in research, psychological tests, measures, and evaluation methods. Hours: 3.00
MHC535
Family Dynamics
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to work with families in a therapeutic setting. Students will explore the history of families and family therapy. Course topics include family systems theories, approaches to family therapy, cultural influences on families, and research and assessment.
**Prereq: MHC516 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC516
Hours: 3.00
MHC542
Group Counseling
This course exposes students to the theories and principles of group counseling. Students will participate in group counseling experiences as both a facilitator and participant to gain insight into group process. Topics include theories of group counseling, group process, and application to various settings and among various groups.
**Prereq: MHC516 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC516
Hours: 3.00
MHC545
Substance Use Disorder Treatment
This course introduces students to substance use disorder counseling. Students will deepen their understanding of substance use disorders and develop competencies associated with substance abuse counseling, including assessment, treatment, and evaluation of substance abuse disorders. Course topics include theories of addiction and addiction treatment, treatment process, and professional development and licensure.
**Prereq: MHC516 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC545
Hours: 3.00
MHC607
Clinical Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment
In this course, students will learn the concepts and techniques used for clinical mental health assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Topics for this course include an introduction to causes, characteristics, and classifications of abnormal behavior, diagnostic criteria, treatment, and prevention of various mental and emotional disorders. Students will examine how external factors such as crisis situations and culture impact assessment and diagnosis.
**Prereq: MHC516 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC516
Hours: 3.00
MHC616
Advanced Counseling Skills
This is an extension of MHC 516 Counseling Techniques and provides an integration of counseling methods and strategies. The topics covered are interviewing, goal setting, creating a therapeutic alliance, and session structuring.
Pre-requisites: MHC516
Hours: 3.00
MHC620
Career Counseling
This course examines theories, assessments, and processes related to career development and career counseling. Students will gain knowledge of the contextual factors that influence career development throughout the lifespan and as it applies to special populations. Additional course topics include multicultural considerations in career development and counseling, using and interpreting tools and assessments, and career counseling in educational settings. Hours: 3.00
MHC625A
Counseling Internship
The Counseling Internship provides students with work experience as a professional counselor under the supervision of an approved agency and site supervisor. In this course, students will begin their internship, which requires 600 hours at a site agency, including a minimum of 240 hours of direct service with clients in both individual and group sessions. Students will also participate in a variety of other professional activities required of professional counselors.
**Prereq: MHC525 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC525
Hours: 1.50
MHC625B
Counseling Internship
The Counseling Internship provides students with work experience as a professional counselor under the supervision of an approved agency and site supervisor. In this course, students will continue pursuing 600 hours at a site agency, including a minimum of 240 hours of direct service with clients in both individual and group sessions. Students will also participate in a variety of other professional activities required of professional counselors.
**Prereq: MHC525 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC525
Hours: 1.50
MHC625C
Counseling Internship
The Counseling Internship provides students with work experience as a professional counselor under the supervision of an approved agency and site supervisor. In this course, students will continue pursuing 600 hours at a site agency, including a minimum of 240 hours of direct service with clients in both individual and group sessions. Students will also participate in a variety of other professional activities required of professional counselors.
**Prereq: MHC525 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC525
Hours: 1.50
MHC625D
Counseling Internship
dThe Counseling Internship provides students with work experience as a professional counselor under the supervision of an approved agency and site supervisor. In this course, students will complete 600 hours at a site agency, including a minimum of 240 hours of direct service with clients in both individual and group sessions. Students will also participate in a variety of other professional activities required of professional counselors.
**Prereq: MHC525 with a 'B' or higher and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.
Pre-requisites: MHC525
Hours: 1.50
MHC642
Advanced Group Counseling Skills
This is an extension of MHC 542 Group Counseling and provides an integration of group counseling theories, methods, and strategies. The topics covered are group counseling microskills, theoretical integration, and specialized group counseling procedures.
Pre-requisites: MHC542
Hours: 3.00
ORL501
Leadership Theories and Practice
Analyzes various leadership theories. Explores strategies for personal, team, and organizational leadership. Examines issues of personal development, teamwork, motivation, influence, power, and change. Students will develop a framework for understanding and practicing leadership. Core questions related to leadership will be considered: What is leadership? Who can lead: What are the characteristics of effective leaders? What do effective leaders do? How is leadership developed? Hours: 3.00
ORL505
Analysis and Research Strategies
Employs key analysis and research strategies for critically evaluating data related to planning and other organizational functions. Students will learn effective research and analysis skills fundamental to any leadership role. By using these skills, students can critically evaluate information: how and where it was acquired, how it is to be used, and how it should be communicated. Hours: 3.00
ORL510
Ethical Leadership
Provides an overview of character as the foundation for effective leadership. Students will learn the impact of values and ethical behavior on their leadership ability and the organization. Using classical and contemporary ethical case studies, students will learn how to analyze a situation to arrive at a values-based decision consistent with Scripture. Hours: 3.00
ORL515
Leading High Performance Teams
Provides theoretical and practical knowledge that can be applied immediately to students' work teams. Using a variety of models and perspectives is essential to becoming an effective leader in today's society, whether in business, non-profit management or church leadership. Students will be able to use the skills learned in this course in a variety of team driven settings. Hours: 3.00
ORL520
Organizational Culture and Politics
Examines behavioral science theory as well as various factors that influence the culture and politics of an organization. Students will learn how to analyze the culture of an organization, determine appropriate communication techniques, and apply them effectively. Understanding the culture and politics within an organization is a critical skill for leaders in today's society. By combining organizational theory with real-life organizational examples, learners will be able to analyze culture and politics and develop communication strategies that will assist in improving overall performance. Students will have the opportunity to analyze their own organization and learn practical approaches for improvement. Hours: 3.00
ORL525
Global Leadership: Leading Across Cultures and Distance
Explores cultural differences and variables. Focuses on developing necessary strategies to become effective global leaders. To this end, multicultural awareness and sensitivity, coupled with interpersonal tools and skills for leadership across distances and cultures, are essential. Theory and practice are blended in this course and provide insight into the many facets of working with individuals and organizations in various cultural frameworks. Students will be enabled to understand the impact of culture and diversity, as well as expand their cross-cultural capabilities, which include creating mutually beneficial partnerships around the world. Hours: 3.00
ORL601
Leadership Mentor Program
Enables students to discuss key leadership lessons learned and the lessons' specific applications to their personal and professional life. Students will interact with knowledgeable, experienced advocates who hold students accountable for aspiring to become effective leaders. Hours: 3.00
ORL605
Intergenerational Leadership
Recognizes generational issues as one aspect of diversity. Focuses on the characteristics of Veterans, Boomers, Xers and Nexters and the impact these characteristics have on the relationships that exist in the workplace. For example, students will explore communication preferences of each group, and their effect on recruiting, managing, and retaining employees. Students will develop skills that will facilitate leading a multigenerational workplace. Theory and practice will be integrated in this course through the use of current research and case studies and journaling by the students. Hours: 3.00
ORL610
Leadership, Change and Innovation
Recognizes generational issues as one aspect of diversity. Focuses on the characteristics of Veterans, Boomers, Xers and Nexters and the impact these characteristics have on the relationships that exist in the workplace. For example, students will explore communication preferences of each group, and their effect on recruiting, managing, and retaining employees. Students will develop skills that will facilitate leading a multigenerational workplace. Theory and practice will be integrated in this course through the use of current research and case studies and journaling by the students. Hours: 3.00
ORL612
Organizational Finance
Develops the understanding and skills needed to build, communicate, and implement an effective organization budget that will meet the financial needs of the organization and all stakeholders. Hours: 3.00
ORL614
Strategic Communication
Develops the understanding and skills needed to lead the development of internal and external communication strategies, deal with crisis communication, and effectively handle national and international media. Hours: 3.00
ORL616
Strategic Leadership and Communication
Students will examine the leader's role in determining a strategic vision and initiatives for meeting the needs of the changing internal and external environment. Students will practice the skills necessary to effectively communicate to both internal and external stakeholders in both proactive and reactive situations. Hours: 3.00
ORL620
Applied Leadership Decision Making
Students will evaluate their own decision-making skills and consider optimal ways of reaching decisions individually and in a group context. The psychology of decision making will be explored with an emphasis on the biases and motivations that may prejudice our decision-making abilities. Participants will critically analyze contemporary decisions in society and apply the course material to a positive organizational context. Students will continue to develop their research techniques and will use the critical thinking skills they develop to identify, explore, and research an issue of their choosing. Hours: 3.00
ORL625
Applied Research Project in Leadership
This course challenges students to examine a leadership issue within an organization by analyzing the issue, developing potential solutions, and implementing a plan to resolve the issue. The Applied Research Project provides leaders with the opportunity to integrate what they have learned throughout the program into on comprehensive project.
Pre-requisites: ORL505
Hours: 4.00
ORL625A
Applied Research Project
This course challenges students to examine a leadership issue within an organization by analyzing the issue, developing potential solutions, and implementing a plan to resolve the issue. The Applied Research Project provides leaders with the opportunity to integrate what they have learned throughout the program into one comprehensive project. Hours: 1.00
ORL625B
Applied Research Project
This course challenges students to examine a leadership issue within an organization by analyzing the issue, developing potential solutions, and implementing a plan to resolve the issue. The Applied Research Project provides leaders with the opportunity to integrate what they have learned throughout the program into one comprehensive project. Successful completion of ORL625A is required to take ORL625B. Hours: 2.00
ORL625C
Applied Research Project
Hours: 2.00
Division of Education Graduate 2018-2019
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
LIT505
Integrating Technology in Literacy Instruction
This course will examine the role of technology integration in the four main tenets of traditional literacy instruction- reading, writing, speaking and listening, as well as provide the opportunity to examine the pedagogical decisions for integrating technology in the classroom. The focus throughout the course is to teach candidates to integrate technology with literacy instruction in a dynamic way that affords students the opportunity to access content and learning in a way that was not possible prior to the advent of specific emerging technologies. Hours: 3.00
LIT510
Strategies for Effective Reading and Writing Instruction
This course examines current trends, best practices, research, and challenges in the teaching of reading and writing at a variety of grade levels. Degree candidates are exposed to professional resources from the field of literacy that invite an exploration of reader's/writer's workshop and readers/writers notebook. Additionally, candidates will focus throughout the course on the development of effective lessons and assessments for student readers and writers. Hours: 3.00
LIT515
Writing for Educators
The purpose of this course is to help students develop graduate-level writing skills. Students will create papers with a clear thesis statement and with well-supported main ideas presented in a logical order. A significant portion of the class will provide grammatical instruction to help students avoid common errors in their writing, especially with respect to sentence structure, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, pronoun usage, and punctuation. Students will also format and document their papers following APA style rules. Hours: 2.00
LIT520
Reaching Second-Language Readers and Writers
This course examines theory and application related to teaching reading and writing to second language learners. The emphasis is on various instructional strategies and materials facilitating the assessment and development of English language learners in elementary and middle grade levels. Hours: 3.00
LIT525
Reaching Reluctant Readers and Writers
The intent of this course is to study the effective engagement of K-9 students whose motivation and interest in reading and/or writing is lacking. The course will take a focused look at affective elements related to literacy instruction such as rapport, student choice, teacher modeling, and authentic assignments. Throughout this course, students will have opportunity to make use of a variety of specific strategies intended to increase motivation and interest in reluctant readers and writers in their own classrooms.. Hours: 3.00
LIT530
Oral Interpretation of Children's Literature
This course will focus on the types of literature and various oral methods which can be used in teaching literature in elementary and middle school. The ongoing focus of the course will be drawing in the interest of students through the creative use of solo and group oral reading. This approach combines performance with some stagecraft. Literature will draw from children's books, poetry, short story, newspapers, diaries and the novel. The course will develop the vocal capabilities of the participants, such as pitch, pace, pause and force. Hours: 3.00
LIT535
Literacy Conference
The culmination of this degree program will be a literacy conference featuring a variety of contemporary literacy topics explored and expounded upon by experts from around the country. Students will be actively involved in hosting this annual event. Hours: 2.00
LIT601
Developing Consumers of Research
In order for students to become mindful consumers of research, this course will introduce students to foundational and current research in literacy. This course will cover the major quantitative methods, qualitative methods, mixed methods, and action research processes. Students will also learn sampling, data collection, and analysis techniques associated with these methods. Students will accomplish these objectives through large-group discussion of readings and individual projects, small-group discussion on topics related to literacy research, instructor and student presentations, written assignments, and feedback through group and one-on-one interaction. Hours: 1.00
LIT605
Communication in Professional Settings
This course will help the students to better communicate as an individual and orally in group presentations by studying and practicing strategies and methods for exceptional presentations to a variety of audiences and readers in an educational setting. Hours: 3.00
LIT610
Literacy Research
In order for students to develop the research skills discussed in LIT 601, they will be guided through the processes of researching an area of literacy, developing a literature review, designing and implementing a small-scale study to be conducted in the student's classroom, and, finally, writing a 'publication-ready' article that combines both the literature review and the findings of the study. Students will develop the 'Implementation' section of this article in order to convey practical application of the findings to the reading audience. Students will accomplish these objectives through large-group discussion of readings and individual projects, small-group discussion on topics related to literacy research, instructor and student presentations, written assignments, and feedback through group and one-on-one interaction. Hours: 3.00
LIT620-1
Evaluating Children's Literature(Grades K-3)
This course explores a wide variety of literature for K-3 children including fiction, nonfiction, traditional literature, picture books, big books, short novels, plays, and poetry. Emphasis will be on both expanding the teacher's knowledge of books, authors, and illustrators as well as creating engaging, meaningful curriculum for children that uses literature to support and extend content learning. Students will enroll in either this course or LIT620-2. Hours: 4.00
LIT620-2
Evaluating Children's Literature (Grades 4-12)
This course will focus on the evaluation of literature including fiction, non-fiction and poetry for use with readers in Grades 4-12. Emphasis will be on both expanding the teacher's knowledge of contemporary literature and how it is used in creating engaging, best- practice curriculum. Reading and class activities will focus on the uses of literature to support and extend literacy learning. Discussion will extend the teacher's ability to implement literature in the classroom and creating in students a lifelong love of reading. Students will enroll in either this course or LIT620-1. Hours: 4.00
LIT630
Writing for Professional Journals
The purpose of this course is to help students revise, edit, and submit articles to professional journals. Students will revise their articles for content, organization, language, and sentence structure. APA Style rules will be used for formatting and documentation. Students will also edit their articles for errors in sentence structure, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, pronoun usage and punctuation. Hours: 3.00
LIT640-1
Assessing and Improving Writing Instruction (Grades K-3)
This course will focus on the rationale and methods for developing expertise in writing instruction in kindergarten through third grade. The emphasis throughout the course is on recognizing the developmental aspects of writing ability and devising appropriate lessons and methods of assessment to help students become better writers. Students will enroll in either this course or LIT640-2. Hours: 3.00
LIT640-2
Assessing and Improving Writing Instruction(Grades 4-12)
This course will focus on the rationale and methods for developing expertise in writing instruction in grades four through twelve. The focus throughout the course is on recognizing the developmental aspects of writing ability and devising appropriate lessons and methods of assessment to help students become better writers. Students will enroll in either this course or LIT640-1. Hours: 3.00
LIT650-1
Assessing and Improving Reading Instruction (Grades K-3)
This course will focus on the implementation of effective reading instruction for the range of readers found in K-3 classrooms. The emphasis will be on utilizing both formal and informal assessment data to guide in the planning and implementation of a comprehensive reading curriculum. Students will enroll in either this course or LIT650-2. Hours: 3.00
LIT650-2
Assessing and Improving Reading Instruction (Grades 4-12)
This course will focus on the implementation of effective reading instruction for the range of readers found in 4-12 classrooms. The emphasis will be on utilizing both formal and informal assessment data to guide in the planning and implementation of a comprehensive reading curriculum. Students will enroll in either this course or LIT650-1. Hours: 3.00
Liberal Arts Graduate 2018-2019
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
MLM501
Practical Theology: Theological Reflection on Ministry Praxis
Too often, theology and life can seem disconnected. The purpose of this course is to prepare students to be theologically grounded scholar-leaders in ministry through engagement with an ongoing, intentional process of practical theology. As one aspect of this process, students will develop competency in using a electronic biblical studies tool such as Logos Bible Software. Hours: 3.00
MLM502
Ministry and the Kingdom of God in Theological Perspective
In this course, students will evaluate various theological positions as well as articulating and defending one's understanding of these positions on foundational areas of Christian theology in relationship to ministry praxis. Traditional theological categories will be addressed within the broader theme of the Kingdom of God narrative (Creation, fall, redemption, vocation, consummation). Hours: 3.00
MLM503
Developmental Perspectives on Ministry
From infancy to elderhood, God created people with a natural process of development in the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual realms. Building on an understanding of theological anthropology, this course will focus on applying the insights of developmental psychology to the critique and design of ministry strategies and programs for persons throughout the lifespan. Hours: 3.00
MLM504
Developing as a Leader in Ministry
The purpose of this course is to facilitate the development of the student's character, spiritual life, and leadership through a process of self-reflection in interaction with a mentor, supervisor, ministry peers, and ministry participants. Hours: 3.00
MLM505
Biblical History and Culture on Location: Holy Land Study Tour
Biblical interpretation is grounded in an understanding of the ancient worlds in which they are rooted. The purpose of this course is to develop students' understanding of and appreciation for biblical history, geography, and cultures through a study tour of the Holy Land. Hours: 3.00
MLM506
Jesus Trail: Spiritual Formation Through the Eyes of Pilgrimage
Ministry is the overflow of one's life in deep connection with the Spirit of God into the lives of others. The purpose of this course is to encourage and enable students to cultivate that ongoing connection with God through the experience of pilgrimage on the Jesus Trail in Israel. Multiple spiritual disciplines will be incorporated into the aspects of the pilgrimage. Hours: 3.00
MLM601
Cultivating Healthy and Effective Ministry Teams
What are the factors influencing the development of ministry teams? How can the leader cultivate healthy and effective teams in ministry organizations? The purpose of this course is to equip and empower students to cultivate healthy and effective ministry teams, whether volunteers and staff. The course will engage students in the biblical, theological, and theoretical foundations related to teams, as they assess the needs of and create a development plan for a team in their ministry setting as well as critique popular thought on leadership in Christian ministry. Hours: 3.00
MLM602
Strategic Planning for Ministry Effectiveness
This course will challenge students to think and act strategically in the development and practice of ministry, through the development of a theology, philosophy, strategy, and praxis of ministry for one's context. Students will research and critique a variety of models in one's area of ministry and then construct a model of ministry for their organizational and community context. Hours: 3.00
MLM603
Facilitating Communities of Learning in Christian Ministries
The facilitation of growth and learning are central to the practice of Christian ministry. In this course, students will integrate an understanding of the theological, biblical, and theoretical foundations of teaching and learning into the development of a curriculum plan and teaching materials for a Christian ministry. Attention will be given to the variety of instructional contexts available in a ministry setting. Hours: 3.00
MLM604
Walking in Their Shoes: Ministry in Context
Ministry is the incarnation of God's mission and purposes within the life of a particular community. In this course students will evaluate and apply various approaches to contextualization for use in their ministry context. Taking advantage of Judson's location, this class will include interaction with ministry leaders in Chicagoland area. Hours: 3.00
MLM605
The Theory, Principles, and Practices of Mentoring in Christian Ministry
The purpose of this course is to evaluate and apply redemptive principles in intentional relationships understood through mentoring theory and principles, reflecting the theological foundations of spiritual formation. The practice of mentoring and discipleship in ministry will also be emphasized as students utilize the skills in the development of a mentoring relationship and the creation of a mentoring ministry within a Christian ministry organization. Hours: 3.00
MLM606
Applied Research Seminar
Serving as the capstone experience for the MLM program, the focus of this course is on the integration of research skills and knowledge developed throughout the program into an applied research project. The course will also encourage students to reflect on their growth and development related to each of the program goals. Minimum Hours: 0.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
MUS510
Professional Apprenticeship
Students receive an additional one-hour private lesson per week from the Judson professor or a guest artist-teacher who actively maintains their performing career. Students should study the graduate-level solo and ensemble repertoire. Offered at the graduate level. Hours: 2.00
MUS520
Research Seminar
Students will have weekly classes, discuss topics related to their performance area, and receive guidance for their research. Each student will select both individual and collaborative research topics, prepare oral presentations, and submit written papers. Topics will include historical and analytical aspects on solo and ensemble works by major composers, performance practice of a specific musical period, and the influences between different genres shown in major composers' works. The voice majors will be encouraged to choose their topics from solo art songs, oratorios, or opera literature, and the instrumentalists from solo, chamber music, or concerto works. Offered at the graduate level. Hours: 2.00
MUS530
Performance Forum
A weekly meeting. Students are required to perform at least six times at the meeting each semester. The length of each performance should be at least five minutes. Students should be also able to present the historical and analytical observations on their pieces in the form of a program note. The professor will coach a student's performance and lead a discussion to draw a better performance. Offered at the graduate level.
Faculty consent required.
Hours: 1.00