Judson University Course Catalog
Index
1. Division of Education 2. Liberal Arts


Division of Education Doctorate 2021-2022
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
EDD605
Communication in Professional Settings
This course will help the students to better communicate as an individual and orally in group presentations by studying and practicing strategies and methods for exceptional presentations to a variety of audiences and readers in an educational setting. Hours: 3.00
EDD612
Advanced Writing for Educators
This workshop will give doctoral candidates a fundamental review of both grammatical concepts and the tenets of strong writing. Candidates will write for a variety of purposes and in a variety of modes throughout this workshop using APA for formatting and documentation. Key attention will be given to the strategic use of phrases and clauses to enhance written work. Usage applications for concepts such as passive and active voice, verb tense, pronoun reference, and sentence structure will be studied. Hours: 3.00
EDD680
Social Equity and Identity
With the ever-changing demographic make-up of America's school system, literacy leaders are faced with the challenge of designing curricular programs that reflect both an understanding of and respect for student identity. By looking at a variety of literary and academic publications, this course will examine ways to inform public discourse regarding social equity and determine ways to best portray a powerful voice in improving the materials and intellectual conditions of students of all ages. Hours: 3.00
EDD701
Methods of Educational Research
This course will introduce doctoral candidates to foundational and current research methodologies such as quantitative, qualitative, mixed methodology, action research, literature review, case study, etc. Candidates will begin to identify and develop individual research interests which will ultimately lead to their dissertation topics as well as the theoretical framework(s) which will become the underpinnings of the dissertation. Candidates will generate their dissertation research question(s) and determine the appropriate research approach(es) and theories to utilize in order to practically answer the research question(s) posed. Hours: 5.00
EDD705
Survey of History & Seminal Studies in Literacy
Candidates will explore significant historical developments and seminal studies in educational systems in America providing important perspectives and implications for instruction, curriculum, and assessment in schools today. In this course, candidates will gain insight on the impact of theories and research; early methods; leaders in the field of education; fads and trends; technology; and cultural, social, and economic issues. Major issues in the development of instruction over time will be examined which include social purpose, systems of power, and education as a force for democratization. Engaging discussion will focus on a variety of perspectives and personal insights. Hours: 4.00
EDD705A
Survey of History and Seminal Studies, Part 1
Part one of a two-course series in which candidates will explore significant historical developments and seminal studies in educational systems in America providing important perspectives and implications for instruction, curriculum, and assessment in schools today. In this course, candidates will gain insight on the impact of theories and research; early methods; leaders in the field of education; fads and trends; technology; and cultural, social, and economic issues. Major issues in the development of instruction over time will be examined which include social purpose, systems of power, and education as a force for democratization. Engaging discussion will focus on a variety of perspectives and personal insights. Hours: 0.00
EDD705B
Survey of History and Seminal Studies, Part 2
Part two of a two-course series in which candidates will explore significant historical developments and seminal studies in educational systems in America providing important perspectives and implications for instruction, curriculum, and assessment in schools today. In this course, candidates will gain insight on the impact of theories and research; early methods; leaders in the field of education; fads and trends; technology; and cultural, social, and economic issues. Major issues in the development of instruction over time will be examined which include social purpose, systems of power, and education as a force for democratization. Engaging discussion will focus on a variety of perspectives and personal insights.
Pre-requisites: EDD705B
Hours: 4.00
EDD710
Initiating Research
This course will introduce candidates to foundational and current research in literacy and will focus on the development of the first three chapters of the dissertation: advancing the foundational framework, ensuring the need for and significance of the candidate's study, refining research questions, structuring the methodology of the study, selecting appropriate research participants, and preparing for the dissertation proposal defense. Major quantitative and qualitative methods, mixed methods, and action research processes will be considered as candidates develop instruments for collecting data and conduct pilot studies (if need be). Once the dissertation proposal has been accepted, candidates will seek approval from the Institutional Review Board as well as appropriate stakeholders in their school communities. Hours: 3.00
EDD720
Conducting Research
Once the dissertation proposal and IRB application have been approved, candidates will begin their dissertation studies. In EDD 720, candidates will learn how to manage and organize the collection of data. They will also learn how to begin preliminary data analysis. As a precursor to EDD 770 and EDD 775, candidates will reflect on their data and will begin to refine analytic methods. Candidates will also conduct ongoing reflection regarding the data collection and analysis phases of their research. Additionally, in this course, candidates will learn how to form their research into a proposal for a scholarly conference. Hours: 2.00
EDD740
Leadership in the Educational Setting
This course explores the principles of effective leadership in general and specifically in the field of literacy. The strong leader's ability to function as both inspired visionary and skilled manager will be discussed. Doctoral candidates will develop process skills to build consensus, communicate effectively, and resolve conflict in order to align resources with a shared vision. Opportunity to dialogue with significant literacy leaders past and present and to explore leadership opportunities will be made available. The research, writing, and submission of literacy grants will be a key facet of this course. Hours: 3.00
EDD770
Quantitative Data Analysis
This course provides an introduction to statistical methods and their implications for educators and educational researchers. The logic underlying research investigation, methodology, analysis, and interpretation of data will be emphasized. Candidates will utilize readings, discussions, and appropriate computer applications to investigate populations and samples; organize, display, and summarize data; and determine probability, normal distribution, tests of significance, and correlation/simple regression. Candidates will develop competence in reading and understanding statistics provided in various sources such as dissertations, journals, and/or technical reports related specifically to the field of literacy. Hours: 2.00
EDD775
Qualitative Data Analysis
This workshop-style course will provide the candidates with the opportunity to pragmatically apply qualitative analysis techniques to their own and their peers' research findings. Paired with EDD 730, which runs concurrently, candidates will employ coding and dissemination strategies as they determine and explain what their raw data mean. In addition, the assigned journal articles and texts will include scholarship on the practice and philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research. Class sessions will follow a workshop format with discussions and activities related to weekly readings that explore the current terrain of qualitative research in the literacy field. Hours: 2.00
EDD785A
Dissertation Writing Workshop Part 1
This workshop is a two-course series, which will concentrate on the revising and editing all chapters of the dissertation. Sophisticated writing and grammatical concepts appropriate for the seasoned writer will be explored. Methods for successfully using the peer review and editing processes will be incorporated into the course. Candidates will receive significant feedback from the instructors on the final chapters and will have considerable opportunity for revision throughout the workshop. Completion of the entire dissertation will be an objective of this course. Hours: 0.00
EDD785B
Dissertation Writing Workshop Part 2
This is the second part of a 2-course workshop which will concentrate on the revising and editing all chapters of the dissertation. Sophisticated writing and grammatical concepts appropriate for the seasoned writer will be explored. Methods for successfully using the peer review and editing processes will be incorporated into the course. Candidates will receive significant feedback from the instructors on the final chapters and will have considerable opportunity for revision throughout the workshop. Completion of the entire dissertation will be an objective of this course. Hours: 4.00
EDL610
Instructional Leadership
The study of instructional leadership emphasizes the appropriate use of instructional practices within the framework of theory and research to enhance organizational effectiveness and improve school culture. The course will require students to develop a general knowledge and understanding of the use of student performance outcomes and data-driven decision making in the areas of curriculum, instruction, data gathering and analysis, goal setting, conferencing, team building, and teacher coaching and mentoring. Hours: 3.00
EDL615
History & Philosphy of Educational Leadership
This course provides an overview of the history of educational leadership in American K-16 education from the American Revolution to the present and the major philosophies of educational leadership that have guided that history. While, at times, we will talk about educational leadership broadly, candidates can focus their learning toward K-12 or higher education contexts. In addition, this course considers the implications of educational leadership theory and practice for current contexts and will challenge candidates to examine and articulate their own philosophy of educational leadership. Hours: 3.00
EDL630
Planning & Evaluating Curriculum
This course includes the historical, sociological, philosophical, and psychological examination of school curriculum, theories, trends and curriculum structure. The course also prepares the candidates to make decisions about best practices that should be implemented in the classroom a part of the teaching and learning process. The course emphasizes the conceptual framework and skills, as well as the values and beliefs, which inform effective school and organizational leadership. This course also explores research based methods for implementing instruction based upon the work of theorists that have presented pedagogy. Hours: 3.00
EDL640
School Finance & Human Resources
This course will focus on the skills necessary for principals to effectively work with faculty and staff. Concepts and approaches for planning and implementing activities for effective human resource management will be explored. Current theories and practices relating to recruitment, development, and appraisal of personnel will be covered. The course will examine specific personnel functions such as recruitment, selection, retention, and evaluation. Additional topics include conflict resolution, effective communication skills, managing the change process, and creating and maintaining a positive school environment. Special attention will be given to evaluation strategies, measuring results, and designing training and developing programs for faculty and staff. Evaluation of personnel for the purpose of meeting school objectives and for professional development will receive emphasis. Hours: 3.00
EDL710
Inquiry in Leadership: Critical & Creative Thinking
In this course, candidates learn about and embody the critical and creative thinking skills necessary to be effective educational leaders of K-16 organizations. The first part of the course will examine, broadly, the cognitive neuroscience of how our brains work and the psychology of decision-making to help us understand why we make the decisions and believe the things we do. Then, using a critical inquiry approach, candidates will discover critical and creative thinking frameworks to examine personal leadership assumptions, biases, and experiences to establish a foundation on which to expand knowledge, self-assessment, and self-realization. After introspective inquiry, candidates will look outward at the structure, organization, governance, and actors within their educational organization and imagine possibilities for creatively and critically inquiring around problems of practice. Annually Hours: 3.00
EDL720
Law & Ethics in Educ Leadership
This course explores legal, ethical and politics issues governing K-16 education in America and the legal responsibilities and powers of state and local governing bodies and individuals that arise in educational organizations. Emphasis is given to federal and state statutes and case law affecting due process, liability, equal protection, and the rights of teachers and students in order to better understand the risks in education management and possible strategies to reduce those risks. Hours: 3.00
LIT655
Literacy Across the Disciplines
In today's classrooms, greater emphasis has been placed on the use of complex discipline-specific texts. In this course, candidates will explore the discipline-specific literacy practices and discuss ways to explicitly make those practices known to students. Candidates will practice a variety of literacy strategies and adapt them to fit the discipline-specific needs of content courses. Through examination of current research and theories, candidates will explore the pedagogical shift from content area literacy instruction toward disciplinary literacy instruction. (2 or 3 credit hours - The three credit option includes a ten hour practicum experience in a secondary school setting.) Minimum Hours: 2.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
LIT660
Storytelling
Storytelling has strong links to literacy. The purpose of this course is to develop the understanding of story and the skills to create and perform storytelling. Students will analyze the components of narrative communication while they develop verbal and nonverbal skills through the experience of personal performance. Creativity and imagination will be explored and applied by adapting of written stories and through original story development. Hours: 3.00
LIT665
Multicultural Children's Literature
The growing diversity of the American population is becoming evident in the literature being published for both children and adolescents. This course will familiarize candidates with diverse and award-winning K-12 literature focused on various cultural groups. Issues of multiculturalism, the history of multicultural children's books, stereotyping, authenticity of perspective, and criteria for evaluating literature used with students will be developed through class activities. Identifying bias-free literature and the effective use of it with K-12 students will be addressed through a variety of learning experiences. Hours: 2.00
LIT670
Classic and Contemporary Books for Children
This course surveys the history of literature for children from earliest times to present day. A wide range of literature for preschool-aged children all the way up to works written for students in grade six will be explored. A key focus of the course will be the evolution of such works in response to changes in society's social beliefs, attitudes, and customs. The most influential books written for and about children in the past 100 years will be discussed and considered. Hours: 3.00
LIT675
Classic/Contemporaty Novels for Young Adults
This course will provide a historical survey of literature written for and about adolescents. The inception of literature written for a young adult audience will be traced through a study of works by authors of classic as well as contemporary novels. A key consideration will be the role young adult literature plays in shaping perceptions of gender, race, and class. Candidates will carefully consider the foundation of canonical literature and its implications on classroom instruction past and present for students in grades 7-12. Discussion of when, where, how, and for whom the works that comprise the young adult canon can be most effectively introduced will be examined in this course as well as the concept of the contemporary YA novel's effectiveness both as a bridge to classic works and a genre worthy of significant study in its own right. Hours: 4.00
LIT690
Clinical Literacy Assessment andInterpretation
Multiple factors contribute to literacy learning. In this course, candidates will discover how to evaluate these factors through the use of various formal and informal assessments. Candidates will administer, score, analyze, and interpret a variety of assessments to collect data and determine a student's strengths and areas of need. The development of student profiles based on a wide range of data and the subsequent reporting of the information in a professional setting will be a focal point of this course. Hours: 3.00
LIT695
Clinical Practicum in Literacy Assessment and Intervention
This course will build on concepts previously presented in LIT 690 and will include a 20-hour practicum. Coursework will focus on research-based strategies for improving student learning in identified areas of weakness. Candidates will plan and deliver intervention in response to assessment data for a specific student by introducing strategies to build on the student's strengths and improve identified areas of need to ensure growth and success. A case study report will be prepared at the conclusion of the course. Hours: 5.00
LIT720
Conducting Research
Once the dissertation proposal and IRB application have been approved, candidates will begin their dissertation studies. In LIT 720, candidates will learn how to manage and organize the collection of data. They will also learn how to begin preliminary data analysis. As a precursor to LIT 770 and LIT 775, candidates will reflect on their data and will begin to refine analytic methods. Candidates will also conduct ongoing reflection regarding the data collection and analysis phases of their research. Additionally, in this course, candidates will learn how to form their research into a proposal for a scholarly conference. Hours: 2.00
LIT730
Evaluating Research Data
With data collection completed, candidates will process what their data mean in the literacy arena. This course will not only emphasize the analysis of the study's results but what the findings mean. Candidates will learn to construct the following sections for the final chapters of the dissertation: results expressed and discussed, conclusions drawn, limitations described, implications for literacy stated, and recommendations for further research delineated. At the completion of this course, the candidate will be prepared for his/her dissertation defense. Hours: 2.00
LIT750
Designing and Delivering Professional Presentations
The delivery of presentations in a wide range of venues is an important facet of contributing to the profession and serves as a benchmark of doctoral study. This course will focus on the components of preparing a professional presentation from the inception of an idea through its execution before an audience. Various methods of delivery will be explored, and doctoral candidates will be immersed in an ongoing critique process as they work to strengthen specific presentations designed for a variety of audiences. Hours: 5.00
LIT770
Quantitative Data Analysis
This course provides an introduction to statistical methods and their implications for educators and educational researchers. The logic underlying research investigation, methodology, analysis, and interpretation of data will be emphasized. Candidates will utilize readings, discussions, and appropriate computer applications to investigate populations and samples; organize, display, and summarize data; and determine probability, normal distribution, tests of significance, and correlation/simple regression. Candidates will develop competence in reading and understanding statistics provided in various sources such as dissertations, journals, and/or technical reports related specifically to the field of literacy. Hours: 2.00
LIT775
Qualitative Data Analysis
This workshop-style course will provide the candidates with the opportunity to pragmatically apply qualitative analysis techniques to their own and their peers' research findings. Paired with LIT 730, which runs concurrently, candidates will employ coding and dissemination strategies as they determine and explain what their raw data mean. In addition, the assigned journal articles and texts will include scholarship on the practice and philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research. Class sessions will follow a workshop format with discussions and activities related to weekly readings that explore the current terrain of qualitative research in the literacy field. Hours: 2.00
LIT785
Dissertation Writing Workshop
This workshop will concentrate on the revising and editing all chapters of the dissertation. Sophisticated writing and grammatical concepts appropriate for the seasoned writer will be explored. Methods for successfully using the peer review and editing processes will be incorporated into the course. Candidates will receive significant feedback from the instructors on the final chapters and will have considerable opportunity for revision throughout the workshop. Completion of the entire dissertation will be an objective of this course. Hours: 4.00
LIT790
Seminar in Writing for Publication
The process of developing belletristic manuscripts for submission will be the focus of this course. A variety of writing formats will be explored including but not limited to children's picture books, lengthier works of fiction, and poetry. Doctoral candidates will learn to identify a market-based need as well as potential outlets for their own written work. The preparation of two manuscript drafts will take place during this course. Hours: 5.00
LIT795
Writing for Scholarly Publication
This course will provide candidates with experience in the scholarly publishing process. In addition to studying the professional writing process and reviewing manuscript guidelines from key scholarly journals, doctoral candidates will synthesize their dissertation research into an article suitable for submission to a literacy research journal. The receipt and delivery of criticism as part of the professional writing community will be a key component throughout the course. Manuscripts will be finalized and submitted for consideration by the end of this course as one of the doctoral benchmarks. Hours: 3.00
LIT797
Independent Study
Doctoral candidates must complete between four and six hours of electives as part of their program. Candidates may select from a wide range of courses to fulfill these electives; however, they may also pursue independent study for up to three hours under the supervision of a professor, advisor, or program director at Judson University. Minimum Hours: 2.00
Maximum Hours: 3.00
LIT799
Doctoral Dissertation
Hours: 2.00
Liberal Arts Doctorate 2021-2022
Course Title & Number Course Description Course Offered Course Hours
DCS705
Ethics & Compliance
Hours: 3.00
DCS710
AI - Human Computer Interaction
Artificial Intelligence (AI) enthusiast project future where autonomous entities carry out intelligent tasks. Researchers, however, continue to announce the difficulties understanding of the constructs of intelligence. Indeed the Alan Turing Test of Intelligence seems to form a good foundation for understanding the represented constructs of problem solving. Hours: 3.00
DCS715
Machine Learning
Hours: 3.00
DCS720
Software Engineering
Software is becoming ever more important to our daily lives, as well as every sector of industry. As software systems increase in capability, they increase in complexity, resulting in delays, defects, and vulnerabilities. Software Engineering research is applying rigorous scientific approaches to address real and meaningful technical challenges. Hours: 3.00
DCS725
Data Warehouse Mining
In a constantly changing business climate the importance of understanding data, information, and knowledge, both explicit and tacit, remain paramount to business success (as well as personal victories). Based on customer touchpoints, advertisers are now able to promote products shoppers are likely to purchase. The constructs of data, information, and knowledge are not limited to advertiser. Indeed, since the advent of the machine age, businesses have been using data gathering, analysis, and knowledge management systems to understand current inventory levels and manufacturing requirements in order to improve Return on Investment decisions. The focus of this course will encourage student to go beyond the basics of such constructs and promote better decision making using Machine Learning (ML) as well as one dimension of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Hours: 3.00
DCS730
Cyber Security & Warfare
Given todays technologically advanced society, the critical need for data collection and analysis, are at odds with societal needs for privacy. Researchers and politicians alike have suggested the likelihood of Cyberwarfare will continue to increase in intensity as we move to the next century. Indeed, it has never become more important for leaders and educators to understand the current body of knowledge, skills, techniques, and tools used to recognize and mitigate cyber-attacks. Students will research current computer and network hardware / software used to identify harmful digital activities and associated actions that can be taken to prevent harmful data breaches. Hours: 3.00
DCS740
Current Issues in Computer Sci
Computer Science is an ever-changing field. Students in DCS740 will consider current trends, issues and events in the field. Hours: 3.00
DCS741
Disruptions in Technology
Hours: 3.00
DCS790
CPT Application
Hours: 0.00
EDD702
Methods of Research
This course will introduce doctoral candidates to the major foundational research methodologies: quantitative, qualitative, mixed methodology. During this course, candidates will identify and begin to develop individual research interests that will ultimately lead to their dissertation topics. Candidates will generate their dissertation research question(s) and draft a dissertation research plan in order to practically answer the research question(s) posed. Hours: 3.00